How to Get Motivated

Motivation is literally the desire to do things. It's the difference between waking up before dawn to pound the pavement and lazing around the house all day. It's the crucial element in setting and attaining goals—and research shows you can influence your own levels of motivation and self-control. So figure out what you want, power through the pain period, and start being who you want to be.

Recent Posts on Motivation

5 Reasons Why People Leave Bad Bosses, Not Companies

People leave bad bosses, not companies: here's why.

Does Happiness Lie Within?

By Steve Taylor Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Out of the Darkness
Consciousness has a natural quality of well-being which we tap into when our minds are quiet and empty

Balancing Inhibition and Exhibition

By Gregg Levoy on March 03, 2015 in Passion!
The desire to keep your spark, your life-force, intact, will always have to contend with agents of decay and distraction. All the forces of resistance and inhibition, from within and without, that can rob you of your vitality if you let them. Here's how to referee that boxing match.

How to Say What You Truly Mean

Saying what you mean is more than a matter of finding the right words. It’s the intonation, or tone of voice, that adds punch to our language. If you’re a victim of “uptalk,” without knowing it, you may be leaving people with a wrong, and confusing, impression.

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 2 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." This is part 2 of a 3-part post explaining why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.

The First Myth About Positive Emotions

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Curious?
Learn about one of the big myths about positive emotions. Don't make the same mistakes that the majority of authors, journalists, and scientists are making.

What Does “Facebook Stalking” Mean for Your Relationship?

Social networking websites like Facebook give us unprecedented access to others’ lives, and the opportunity to spy on our romantic partners like never before. A new study investigates how this kind of Facebook surveillance is related to the types of relationships we have.

How to Stop Feeling Guilty About Your Lack of Orgasms

Most women who haven’t had their first orgasm are incredibly hard on themselves. They feel ashamed, embarrassed, defeated, anxious, unwomanly, self-conscious, and alone. Learn how you can transform your relationship with orgasm.

Facebook and Happiness

Given results in social psychology, should we be very careful of using Facebook passively, lest we too succumb to a decline in affective well-being?

Using Treats: Bribe or Bonus?

Does your pet only listen to you when you have a treat? If your pet is a criminal mastermind, blame the training, not the treat.

Parenthood and Resilience

By Michael W Austin on March 02, 2015 in Ethics for Everyone
Resilience is a crucial but often neglected trait that parents should try to build in their children.

Chasing Happiness May Leave You Unhappier than Ever

Pursuing happiness for the sake of feeling better tends to backfire. But, research shows there are some concrete steps you can take to boost your mood effectively.

5 Things Everyone Should Know About Resilience

By Peg Streep on March 02, 2015 in Tech Support
When we speak of someone being "resilient," we tend to think of it as a character strength. But what is resilience anyway, and what does it take to weather the setbacks in life? A look at the research reveals much...

Why You Should be More Grateful

By Neel Burton M.D. on March 01, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Despite its many benefits, gratitude is hard to cultivate.

Self-Regulation of Creative Behaviors

Psyching yourself to be creative.

Delivering Bad News

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in A Sideways View
Whilst it is usually both easy and enjoyable giving people good news, it is often very difficult delivering bad news to people. What do we know about the process and the best way to do it?

How To Keep Resolutions?

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in Science of Choice
Personal rule as a self-control strategy helps people see current decisions as predictors of future behavior and the awareness of this linkage help them overcome temptation.

How to Find Proof That Hope is Not Lost

By Gregg McBride on February 28, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
The little, seemingly innocuous ways you take care of yourself are your proof that you care about yourself. And this "proof of caring" can be the first step toward committing yourself to lasting and permanent change when it comes to other matters like losing weight, embracing wellness, and/or getting healthier.

How (Not) to Win the War on Terrorism

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
How can we protect society against a few committed radicals who can disrupt society by marshaling powerful communications networks? In the good old days, we tracked the movement of physical assets as early warning signs of trouble. What can we do now, when weapons are intangible and untraceable? Might it be possible to mobilize the mainstream as a balancing force?

Kick the Bucket List

What is the difference between a bucket list and a five-year plan?

Addiction Speaks

By Abigail Brenner M.D. on February 27, 2015 in In Flux
Addiction comes in many shapes and forms. Not all addictions are alike in their severity and duration. Even those addictions that are less severe and less life-threatening can hold us in its clutches for years on end. This entry includes a letter written to Veronica by her "addict self." What emerges from our own depths and from our own will to heal is often poignant.

3 Fascinating Ways To Improve Your Wellbeing

When it comes to improving your wellbeing, what would you be willing to try? With studies suggesting, more than seventy percent of people around the world report they are struggling or suffering, as they face into each day ahead it’s clear many of us need a little extra help when it comes to thriving. So where does the science suggest starting?

Living in the Here and Now

By Susan Hooper on February 26, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
For most of my life, I have wanted to be somewhere else, living an entirely different life. A calendar from years ago showed me that I had then—and may even have now—a life that other people might envy.

The Psychological Antidote – Part II

By Ran Zilca on February 26, 2015 in Confessions of a Techie
If today we choose to show others how similar we are to them instead of how different, we may prove their dehumazing thoughts wrong, break the vicious cycle of dehumanization, and prevent tomorrow’s violence by creating a situation that reduces the motivation for conflict.

Are Kids Curious?

By Glenn C. Altschuler Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in This Is America
In The Hungry Mind, Engel draws on the latest social science research to understand why curiosity is nearly universal in babies, and less evident in school. Although most children learn more when their curiosity is piqued, “schools do not always, or even often, foster curiosity.” But in an era that prizes quantifiable results, curiosity is not likely to be a priority.

Envisioning the Future for Your Child with Autism

By Chantal Sicile-Kira on February 25, 2015 in The Autism Advocate
When envisioning the future of your child as an adult – any child – it’s important to focus on the strengths that are apparent. And as the parent of a child with autism, it’s even more important. The strengths your child has will help him overcome his deficits, perhaps even become a way for your child to be employed as an adult, or be motivated to learn new skills.

3 Reasons Your Kids Won't Take "No" For An Answer

By Erica Reischer Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in What Great Parents Do
The surprising truth about why your kids won't take "no" for an answer and what to do about it

Stop Hating Yourself Once and For All

By Lisa Firestone Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Compassion Matters
Throughout a given day, we experience a barrage of sadistic thoughts so smoothly and so frequently that we hardly notice we’re under attack. We may try to compensate for insecurities, but deep down, we are our own worst enemy. So, what causes us to turn against ourselves and how can we stop?

The Benefits of a Coach During Your Divorce

By Angie Hallier on February 25, 2015 in Life After Divorce
Your divorce will be a time of intense emotions, whether you’re the one that wanted the divorce or not. If you want the divorce, you may feel impatience, eagerness, or detachment. If you did not want the divorce, you are probably feeling sadness, shock, or betrayal. Whatever you are feeling, your emotions may cause your divorce to be much more expensive than it should be.

Are People Naturally Scientific?

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Hot Thought
Some social and developmental psychologists have claimed that people—even children—naturally think like scientists. I find this claim implausible because: people are naturally religious rather than scientific; everyday thinking frequently deviates from scientific reasoning; and science is a relatively recent cultural development.