What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is a state of active, open attention on the present. When you're mindful, you observe your thoughts and feelings from a distance, without judging them good or bad. Instead of letting your life pass you by, mindfulness means living in the moment and awakening to experience.

Recent Posts on Mindfulness

Fraudulent Draft Day Fantasies

The lights of the NHL shine bright on draft night and they can easily blind optimal motivation. Sometimes dreams can be so vivid and so emotionally sustaining they leave an individual neglecting to attend to important initiatives and hurdles during the journey.

If You Love Cats, This May be Why

Many of us love cats, but we may not have considered one major reason why we find them so irresistible. This article explores how cats have an uncanny ability to surrender to affection. We humans would do well to be more like a cat in the sense of deepening our capacity to receive love and affection.

“Minding” Egrets—Humility In Being Human

Waking at her beach cottage, Dr Coche reflects on the overarching presence of graceful white egrets in her summer world. She reminds us of conservationist Marc Bekoff’s warning: “We bear a human imperative to honor and preserve other species planet wide.”

What Happens in the Shower May Not Stay in the Shower

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on July 02, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
Experiencing your shower in a different way might change your day.

7 Ways to Mitigate Self-Doubt

Are you struggling with self-confidence? Learn how to overcome negative thinking and live to your fullest potential. Here are seven tips to mitigate self-doubt and create a new path to renewed confidence.

Mindfulness and the Average Smartphone

Technology can provide organization, efficiency, and entertainment, but it can also distract, disorganize, and disorient. In spite of how it often feels, technology at its best aims to make life simpler. Instead of promoting distraction, it can help develop clarity and awareness in our lives. So here are some ways to cultivate mindfulness through technology.

How to Be Mindful in the Real World

So when it comes to improving your wellbeing, is there a contemplative practice for your brain that would actually be worth starting?

Are You Having a Relationship with an Adult Coloring Book?

As of this writing, five of the top 30 titles on Amazon’s best-seller list are adult coloring books. With over 2000 titles out there and rising, the phenomenon of adult coloring-within-the-lines just seems to have no end in sight. Just why have adult coloring books become such a phenomenon?

The Power of Integrative Medicine When All Else Fails

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in Feeling It
A new generation of patients and doctors is changing the face of American medicine. It's about more than curing disease now—it's health for the whole person.

Revolutionary: the Pressure-Less Diet

If you feel like you are burdened daily, have trouble sleeping, and going nowhere fast, it's time to start the pressure-less diet.

9 Ways to Calm Your Anxious Mind

Are you stuck in overthinking? Anxious thoughts and worries can overwhelm you and make it even more difficult to make decisions and take action to deal with whatever problem is bothering you. Learn tools from Mindfulness and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy to take back control of your life.

Sparks of Genius Challenge #2: Non-Visual Observing

Observing is never a purely visual act. What we see is affected by what we have touched with our hands and felt within our bodies. The same goes, of course, for what we don’t see, but hear, smell or taste. By exercising non-visual forms of observing we heighten our attention overall.

Gay Marriage, Racism, and Obamacare: The Challenge of Caring

The gay marriage struggle, modern racism, and the disregard for the poor shown in the opposition to Obamacare all have a common root. We are wired for empathy, but not for a sense of common humanity and emotional openness. The challenge is not that we do not care: it is that we do.

The Joy of Mindful, Asynchronous Sex

By Laurie B. Mintz Ph.D. on June 24, 2015 in Stress and Sex
During asynchronous sex, the receiver can connect her body and mind in space and time—or in other words, she can cultivate the mindful focus that has been shown to increase orgasmic capacity

Do Parts of How You Are Bother You or Others?

By Dan Mager MSW on June 24, 2015 in Some Assembly Required
Reactions driven by personality challenges are unconscious and automatic, like a reflex. You don’t think about it, it just happens... However, we can learn and develop the skills to respond to other people and situations intentionally with conscious awareness, rather than react on impulse.

Can We Choose Our Identity?

By David J Ley Ph.D. on June 23, 2015 in Women Who Stray
Caitlyn Jenner, Rachel Dolezal, Barrack Obama. The news today is filled with a debate about how much choice and control we truly have, over defining who and what we are.

Getting Intentionally Lost Later in Life

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on June 23, 2015 in Listen Up!
As we age, taking a Time Out can be crucial to vital involvement in our life. How to create a space where we can renew and rediscover ourselves?

5 Types of Self-Talk That Guide, Heal, and Motivate

By Meg Selig on June 23, 2015 in Changepower
For positive self-talk that can raise your confidence, motivate you, and soothe your troubled spirit, strengthen these 5 helpful inner voices. Yes, everyone has them!

When the Student Is Ready the Teacher Will Appear

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on June 23, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
With some work and awareness, we can be ready to appreciate and learn many things we might otherwise overlook.

All Things Murder

New edition of long-running "bible" of homicide investigation includes recent innovations and additional photos.

Seeking Solitude but Finding Loneliness: Five Wrong Turns

Many of us feel the need to seek out solitude. Recently, though, I’ve been learning that this quest for time alone can be a gamble. Sometimes, when all that I’m seeking is a little solitude, I can take a wrong turn somewhere and find myself way out in a lonely place. Here are five wrong turns that might take us away from solitude and toward loneliness.

The Need for Safety in Therapy, Part Three

“Internal” safety relates to the client’s “felt sense” and subjective inner processes that serve as an emotional barometer for them throughout the process.

People Don’t Always Make a Lot of Sense

Patients don't always do what they should, or what they say they will. When you try to figure out the reason, you may find out that there isn't any.

Miyamoto Musashi and Vision In Martial Arts

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on June 17, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
Seeing is believing but can training help refine what we actually perceive?

My Religion Is Kindness

By Tara Brach Ph.D. on June 17, 2015 in Finding True Refuge
One of the wonderful teachings of the Dalai Lama, something he says quite regularly, is “My religion is kindness.” When we hear that, it resonates, because it points to something at the core of all spiritual and humanistic paths. If we just dedicated our lives to kindness, to the qualities of friendliness and care, we would be directly serving peace on earth.

You Are Not Strengths-Based, Even When You Think You Are

Most people who help others believe they are "strengths-based." This is a fallacy. Each of these individuals is likely for more problem-based than strengths-based. Many people are "momentary strengths-based." Here are some stories to exemplify these points. I conclude with 10 insights on strengths blindness and mindfulness and strengths.

Which Buddhist Teachings Might Be Most Helpful?

Examine the teachings in light of your understanding of what is harmful and leads to suffering, and what is beneficial and leads to peace and well-being. I think of myself as an eclectic Buddhist, meaning that I study, practice, and write about whatever I think is beneficial and alleviates suffering, regardless of which tradition it comes from.

Tackling the Emotions in Borderline Personality Disorder

People with borderline personality disorder have one of the most challenging psychological problems to treat. Furthermore, if you or someone you know is in a relationship with someone who has this disorder, you know how difficult it can be to live with the disorder. Mentalization-based therapy, focused on emotions, may provide an important new approach.

The Art and Science of Happiness

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on June 16, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Perspective determines whether a ruby is a jewel, or a ruby is a stone; and whether being by yourself is the rapture of solitude or the agony of being alone.

Building With LEGO Kit Instructions Makes Kids Less Creative

By Garth Sundem on June 16, 2015 in Brain Candy
The more we complete "well-defined" problems like LEGO kits, the worse we are at solving "ill-defined problems": create something beautiful, discover something meaningful, find someone to love.