Memory makes us. If we couldn't recall the who, what, where, and when of our everyday lives, we wouldn't be able to function. We mull over ideas in the present with our short-term (or working) memory, while we store past events and learned meanings in our long-term (episodic or semantic) memory. What's more, memory is malleable–and it tends to decay with age. So stay sharp by learning about the science of recollection.

Recent posts on Memory

Is Slurred Speech a Sign of Vascular Dementia?

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on December 10, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
Strokes can lead to problems with speech, walking, strength, thinking, and memory, and are a common cause of dementia. But can you diagnose someone just by observing them?
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5 Facts You Need to Know About Dementia

By Mylea Charvat, Ph.D. on December 07, 2017 in The Fifth Vital Sign
Did you know that not all dementia is irreversible?

Psychotherapy Is THE Biological Treatment

Psychiatric problems come purely from traumatic adaptations as digested by our temperament. Psychotherapy deactivates problematic brain mappings and activates healthier ones.

Dispelling Three Popular Myths About Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's myths could be compromising your brain health.
Wikimedia Commons

Not Talkative? Not Emotional? That’s Okay, and Here’s Why.

By Michael S. Scheeringa M.D. on December 07, 2017 in Stress Relief
If you have PTSD, when you talk about your traumatic memories, do you fall into the categories of Expressive, Avoidant, Undemonstrative, or Fabricated?
Twenty20

Losing It

Although everyone loses things, no one has studied how we search for lost items. This would be a wonderful research topic that could shed light on memory more generally.
Helen Schwartzman Collection

Shopping Alone

What do we miss when we shop online?

Don’t Listen to Your Lizard Brain

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on December 03, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
10 million years of evolution has led to the development of the neocortex to control our primitive drives. So why does it seem to fail so frequently?

Could an App Diagnose Your Memory Problems?

Could an iPad app diagnose you with dementia? Researchers believe it can.

4 Little Words That Can Forever Change Your Relationship

New research on an age-old phenomenon suggests that it only takes 4 words to revitalize your relationship, as you remember how it all started.

Feeling Bad?

By Jeff Corbin, MD MPH on December 01, 2017 in Rethinking Normal
Positive and negative emotions — we all have them. Here's why.

Blade Runner 2049

By Madelon Sprengnether on December 01, 2017 in Minding Memory
Blade Runner challenges our notions of what distinguishes human from technological forms of intelligence — an increasing concern, if not obsession, of our age.
Africa Studio/Shutterstock

What's the World Coming to?

By Alex Pattakos Ph.D. on December 01, 2017 in The Meaningful Life
Where would Aesop be if he had been unable to craft his stories, each fable fitting a definite moral?

Reflections on a Wooden Bowl

By Susan Hooper on November 30, 2017 in Detours and Tangents
Rediscovering a family heirloom made me curious about its owner—my great-grandmother.

The Politics of Memory

By Robert N. Kraft Ph.D. on November 29, 2017 in Defining Memories
The perfect Pinocchio test does not yet exist, but we can use principles of memory (and forgetting) to distinguish between memory errors and deliberate deception.

Should You Check Your Genes for Alzheimer’s Disease?

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on November 26, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
Anyone can now find out if they have the most common genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s. But what will you do with the information?

How Emotions Shape Your Digital Experience

By Liraz Margalit Ph.D. on November 24, 2017 in Behind Online Behavior
Memories of feelings provide the necessary information with minimal brain load.

The Ways Forgetting Makes You Smarter

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on November 23, 2017 in The Fallible Mind
Forgetfulness needn't be a harbinger of dementia: Wiping irrelevant facts and memories from our mind readies the brain to remember new and meaningful ones.

Neuroscience Reveals Why Favorite Songs Make Us Feel So Good

By Christopher Bergland on November 22, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have pinpointed why the songs we love give us intense pleasure.
Dina Rose/Original image depositphotos/unkreatives

Thanksgiving: Why Happy is More Important than Healthy

You've been inundated with advice on how to make Thanksgiving healthy. Do what you want but don't try to make your kids eat differently than they desire. Here's why.

You Can’t Go Home Again

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on November 20, 2017 in A Swim in Denial
“Home for the holidays” promises “all the comforts of home,” but also brings the sorrows of home. Why do we do it? Is it a homing instinct? An addiction? Just unfinished business?

Huperzine: An Effective Chinese Herbal for Dementia

Are you looking for information about herbal treatments for dementia? Huperzine may be more effective than available anti-dementia medications.

“Learned Mindfulness”: Achieving Authentic Integrity

"Learned Mindfulness" is achieving Authentic Integrity. This Integrity Mindfulness model prevents job burnout and optimizes the quality of life.

Why You Should Consider Serving Fish This Thanksgiving

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on November 19, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
Wondering what foods can reduce the risk of stroke and Alzheimer’s and actually improve cognitive function? Hint: It isn’t blueberries, coconut oil, or turmeric.

Sleep Strengthens Recent Learning and Negative Memories

By Lydia Denworth on November 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
What happens in the brain during sleep? Quite a lot. Machine learning and EEG are revealing how memories, especially negative ones, and learning are boosted while we're asleep.
Dakota Lynch/wikimedia commons

The Absent Presence for Suicide Grievers

By Elizabeth Young on November 16, 2017 in Adaptations
“I feel closer to them all,” Carla says.  “And I feel so sad to know they are gone from us.”

A Face in the Crowd: What Type of People Are Most Memorable?

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 13, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
Ever wonder why certain people stand out in your mind? What is it about them that makes them so unforgettable? The answer likely has more to do with you than them.

(Un)forgettable: Memory Tripping with One-Hit Wonders

A chance encounter with a forgotten song from one’s forgotten past contains three key ingredients for a positively potent—and potently positive—memory experience.

Understanding Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on November 12, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
The pathology of Aaron Hernandez was just one part of the 2017 Boston University CTE Conference, which presented the latest research and our current understanding of this disorder.

You Just Got Dumped – Nice Timing, Right?

By Joseph Cardillo Ph.D. on November 12, 2017 in Attention Training
These 5 energy changers can help heal your broken heart.