Memory makes us. If we couldn't recall the who, what, where, and when of our everyday lives, we wouldn't be able to function. We mull over ideas in the present with our short-term (or working) memory, while we store past events and learned meanings in our long-term (episodic or semantic) memory. What's more, memory is malleable–and it tends to decay with age. So stay sharp by learning about the science of recollection.

Recent posts on Memory

What Is the Rip Van Winkle Effect?

How do you stop time from passing by so quickly?

Why Do We Ask Why?

By Mario Livio Ph.D. on June 23, 2017 in Why?
Curiosity fuels brain growth, and brain growth drives curiosity. And you wouldn't be so curious if your ancestors hadn't learned to cook.

Why We Forget

Not the power to remember, but its very opposite—the power to forget—is a necessary condition of our existence.

Splitting Your Ex Makes Breakup Recovery That Much Harder

Splitting is the mental magician trick of remembering your ex as only good and impedes breakup recovery. Here are five things to know about splitting to help you move on.

Learning Stuff While Missing the Point

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on June 20, 2017 in Memory Medic
The best way to remember factoids is the thinking required to understand them.

The Factor That Administers Cognitive Control over Emotions

Some recent research on poor cognitive control and depression has overlooked four issues. This post suggests that it is cognitive understanding of reality that regulates emotions.

Memoirs: Learning Too Late About Our Dad’s Military Life

In writing a memoir about growing up with Italian grandparents, I came to see all the questions we might have asked about our father.

Stop Thinking, Start Being

What frightens people about adding mindfulness or meditation to their lives? Savor the "now" to be able to relish the memory.

Does White Noise Help You Learn?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Memory Medic
How do you promote focus in an environment of distractions?

How to Start Healing After Personal Trauma

Do you feel too fragmented after a traumatic event? A few lifestyle adjustments can help you feel whole again.

Early Childhood Memories: Endure or Drift Away?

How stable are early recollections, and why does it matter?

The Loss of a Child

By Asa Don Brown Ph.D. on June 07, 2017 in Towards Recovery
There is no greater grief, than when a parent losses a child.

What Your Radio Knows About You

One day not so long ago, I was flipping through channels on my car radio, looking for the song that would hit the spot.

What If Your Mind Lost Its Words?

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on June 05, 2017 in Creating in Flow
Imagine if you stopped talking to yourself in your head. Living with impaired language abilities changes the way we think about who we are. A first-person account illuminates.

Breakfast, Brains, and Entropy

What Waffle House hash browns can teach us about the origins of human consciousness.

The Meaning Behind the Meaning

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on May 31, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story about lexical love.
Rob Schofield, Flickr

Can You Hear What You See? More So Than You Imagine

Perception may be due for a redefinition. Our eyes see, but vision can apparently also hear. Tactile receptors can also taste. We may all have a bit of synesthesia in us.
Goodluz/iStockPhoto

Picture Perfect?

Parents often do not intend to relay the message that comes with unwanted photography: it is more important for me to get the right shot of you than to respect your wishes.

Forever Now

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on May 21, 2017 in Memory Medic
The usually benign herpes simplex virus is not always so benign.

Cancer, Keeping Active, and the Mind

By Anne Moyer Ph.D. on May 17, 2017 in Beyond Treatment
Cancer treatment can make one reluctant to get moving.

Stress and Memory Impairment in Older Adults

Stress reduction is important for optimal cognitive aging.

The Habit Replacement Loop

Replace your bad habits with good ones! New research on habit formation offers information on how to improve student success by establishing a new normal in learning.

The Radical Notion of Returning to Handwriting

Need to remember something or learn something new? Write it by hand.

From A Mother Who Died Too Young

I share reflections on losing my mother at a young age to cancer, and what this has taught me about motherhood.

Naps Help Preschoolers Learn Language

By Temma Ehrenfeld on May 12, 2017 in Open Gently
Small children learn words more easily if they get enough sleep.

Cannabis Reverses Brain Aging in Mice

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on May 09, 2017 in Cravings
Struggling with memory loss? Finding it hard to learn new things? Scientists are one step closer to finding a treatment for the loss of cognitive function associated with aging.

Diet Soda Tied to Memory Loss

By Temma Ehrenfeld on May 08, 2017 in Open Gently
Soda, diet or sugary, is linked to memory loss.

The Secret to Remembering Your Vacation Better

By Andrea Bartz on May 08, 2017 in The Wandering Mind
New research shows us how to make that trip stick.

Investigating Brain Activity Outside the Laboratory

The brains have left the lab! This relatively new neuroimaging method enables researchers to study psychological phenomena in naturalistic environments.