Memory makes us. If we couldn't recall the who, what, where, and when of our everyday lives, we wouldn't be able to function. We mull over ideas in the present with our short-term (or working) memory, while we store past events and learned meanings in our long-term (episodic or semantic) memory. What's more, memory is malleable–and it tends to decay with age. So stay sharp by learning about the science of recollection.

Recent posts on Memory

Tap Into the Inner Genius You Didn’t Know You Had

Research show that genius is inside each of us, but how can we access it?
tookapic at pexels

Fighting Dementia Through Vision and Hearing

By Matthew J. Edlund M.D. on October 19, 2017 in The Power of Rest
Small changes in vision and hearing affect future dementia. What can you do?

Homo Dichotomus

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on October 14, 2017 in One Among Many
When statisticians call each other mad.
Random House

Our Memory Quirks: Are They for Us or against Us?

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on October 14, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
What if your recollections turned out to be false? Here's a book that tutors you on how your memory works (and doesn't).

Getting Sentimental Could Increase Your Savings

By Brad Klontz Psy.D., CFP on October 12, 2017 in Mind Over Money
How can we harness positive, emotionally charged memories to develop a deeper incentive for saving?

Why People Hold Grudges and What to Do About Them

When people hold grudges against you, it can be painful and confusing. New research shows there’s a reason they act this way. Understanding why may help you feel a bit better.

The Art of Nostalgia

Nostalgia is an aesthetic form of memory, and our relation to our nostalgic memories is much like that of a painter to a work of art.

Taking a Stand When Taking a Knee

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
How we rewrite and romanticize memories of protests.

My Evening with Armistead

By Rick Miller LICSW on October 04, 2017 in Unwrapped
Who are you now? How did you get here? Who helped you arrive

Seeking Redemption: The Rage of Alzheimer’s

By Greg O'Brien on October 04, 2017 in On Pluto
Profane language can be common in Alzheimer’s. An expression of gut rage and loss of filter, along with inadvertent grabbing, kicking, pushing, and throwing.
"Yin and Yang" by Klem - This vector image was created with Inkscape by Klem, and then manually edited by Mnmazur.. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons a/File:Yin_and_Yang.svg

Alien Abduction Part III

By John Cline Ph.D. on September 30, 2017 in Sleepless in America
Alien abduction experiences may be due to a wide range of causes including hypnotic phenomena, surgical anesthesia, sleep state dissociations, and maybe alien abductions.

Using Your Smartphone Camera as a Mindfulness Tool

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on September 28, 2017 in Minding the Body
Point, shoot, observe. Your phone’s camera may help you focus on the moment and foster mindfulness. It all depends on how you use it.

Magnesium and Zinc Are Essential for Healthy Brain Function

Ever wonder about the role of magnesium and zinc in healthy brain function? Studies show that both minerals have beneficial effects on mood, memory and other areas of functioning.

Inositol and Choline in Mental Health Care

Are you curious about inositol, choline and other B vitamins in mental health care? Emerging findings suggest these vitamins may reduce symptoms of depressed mood and anxiety.

Outlook on Alzheimer's No Longer Bleak

options for reversing early Alzheimer's exist.

Expressive Writing Liberates the Mind from Chronic Worrying

By Christopher Bergland on September 24, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Taking a few minutes to jot down your innermost thoughts and feelings can offload chronic worries and makes your brain more efficient, according to a new study.

Aging Shrinks the Brain

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on September 23, 2017 in Memory Medic
Age discrimination is not defensible. Each elderly person's mental competence has to be judged on its own merits, not on a negative stereotype of the elderly.

What Narcissists Won’t Tell You About their Past

Although no one’s memory is perfect, memory in people high in narcissism is particularly flawed, especially when it comes to their flaws. New research shows why they're so biased.

What Creates Superior Brain Connectivity, According to Study

By Susan Reynolds on September 19, 2017 in Prime Your Gray Cells
Participants on the “positive” side reflected stronger connectivity associated with higher cognitive functions, including memory, language, introspection, and imagination.

Low Brain Cholesterol—Separating Fact from Fiction

By Georgia Ede MD on September 17, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
How vegan diets and cholesterol-lowering drugs affect mood and memory.

Right Brain and Left Brain Share Duties On "As Needed" Basis

By Christopher Bergland on September 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Growing evidence debunks the myth of creativity being seated in the "right brain." A new Duke study illuminates how the left brain and right brain can share duties when necessary.

The Sound of Memory

By Mark D. Humphries Ph.D. on September 16, 2017 in Neural Processing
"You must remember this song!" How your brain remembers what you hear

Exploding Three Myths and Stereotypes of Aging

Are we really predestined to become senile and fall apart as we age? Let's stand up for ourselves and appreciate the facts of growing older.

The World Isn’t Designed Well for People With Bipolar

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on September 11, 2017 in Take Control
How can we better engineer products to help people with bipolar disorder?

Bipolar Disorder and Expectations About the Future

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on September 10, 2017 in Take Control
I thought I could handle things, but bipolar really interferes.

Misremembering American History

Do you know your American history? Your reaction to current events may reveal some surprising blind spots.

Why Do Humans Make Art?

By Nathan H. Lents, Ph.D. on September 05, 2017 in Beastly Behavior
Understanding the the many aspects of art reveals its possible functions and origins in our past.

What the World Needs More: Social Interest

By Arthur J. Clark Ed.D. on September 04, 2017 in Dawn of Memories
The Most Human Way of Being and Early Recollections

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Honor the Irreplaceable Moments

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on September 03, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Moments in our life that are unique and memorable bring opportunities to show love of our self and of another. They require us to slow down, allow the mystical, and be authentic.

Pressing the Button

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 02, 2017 in How To Do Life
At death’s door, she revisits her life.