Memory makes us. If we couldn't recall the who, what, where, and when of our everyday lives, we wouldn't be able to function. We mull over ideas in the present with our short-term (or working) memory, while we store past events and learned meanings in our long-term (episodic or semantic) memory. What's more, memory is malleable–and it tends to decay with age. So stay sharp by learning about the science of recollection.

Recent posts on Memory

Ginkgo Biloba for Mild to Moderate Dementia

If you or a loved one are thinking about trying Ginkgo for a memory problem, first review the evidence. Findings for Ginkgo in dementia are inconsistent.

Dietary Changes Reduce Alzheimer's Risk

Are you worried about developing Alzheimer's disease? Simple dietary changes can reduce your risk.
M. Streed

Drawing the Devil

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 22, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Forensic artists face a digitized future, but a former detective offers facial composition software that replicates his successful drawing methods.

The Self Illusion and Psychotherapy

The self is an illusion and, as I noted in a recent paper published in Australasian Psychiatry, we can tailor psychotherapy to highjack the mechanisms that create it.
Pixabay

Mirror Neurons, Empathy, and the First Memories of Life

By Arthur J. Clark Ed.D. on March 19, 2017 in Dawn of Memories
How neuroscience informs the meaning of early childhood recollections.

Helpful Hacks for Conducting Research With Older Adults

By Christina M. Pierpaoli on March 18, 2017 in Eng(aging)
A psychologist-in-training discusses sources of error in geropsychologial research and clever, practical ways of managing them.

Kindling Your Child’s Enthusiasm for School

No other generation has had to cope with this ever-increasing fund of information. Improved technology and more information has led to more memorization & less meaningful learning.

10 Ways to Make it Through Your Life’s Transitions

We are all, perhaps, creatures of habit so when we’re forced to change, it can be tough. Using these 10 tips, you’ll be able to handle whatever changes life throws your way.

Poetry Lights Up Your Brain Like a Favorite Song, fMRI Shows

New research on the link between happy or scary musical cues—and the difference between reading poetry or prose—offer new clues about how the brain responds to music and poetry.

Are Plants Aware?

By Robert Lanza M.D. on March 11, 2017 in Biocentrism
We usually only call something sentient if it responds to us. But despite our human preconceptions, plants may experience consciousness albeit in a different fashion from us.

When Aging Parents Feel Like Giving Up—Now What?

The emotional price for caregiving can be high. But there are some things you can do to improve your energy and that of your loved one.

Tweaking the Past to Prepare for the Future

A recent study suggests that imagining what might have been in the past can help you prepare for what might be in the future.

How to Train Your Brain Like a Memory Champion

By Lydia Denworth on March 08, 2017 in Brain Waves
Want to improve your memory? A new study shows that a strategy used by memory athletes produces superior memory in regular people and changes their brains, too.

What Does Information Look Like in the Brain?

Does thinking harder or experiencing deep emotions like love, fear, or anguish light up more neurons? Probably not.

Maintaining the Bond Through Living Memorialization

Some forms of memorialization may better enhance our feelings of connectedness with the deceased.

A Really Big Question Part I

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on February 27, 2017 in Ambigamy
Buddies kick the tires on a popular explanation for life: that life energy, vital force, spirit or soul enters matter and makes it come alive. They come away curious.

Food and Sex

Food, sex and the pleasure principle

Can You Improve Adult ADHD Without Medications?

Do you have Adult ADHD? Are there non-medication treatments? Have you tried medications but experience too many side effects or only partial benefit?
Svitlana-ua/Shutterstock

To Sleep, Perhaps to Learn

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Memory Medic
Odds are the kids in your life are not getting enough sleep. Scientists now know that sleep is needed for "smart forgetting."

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

By Christopher Bergland on February 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

Declinism: Why You Think America is in Crisis

Is America really on the brink of disaster? Studies show most people feel things are bad and getting worse. Declinism, based on cognitive bias, explains why.

5 Tips to Tame Word-Finding Difficulties

Frustrated by word-finding difficulties? Harness the hidden opportunity they provide to boost your brain health.

Deep Memories of Insects

By Jeffrey Lockwood Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in The Infested Mind
What creatures infest the dark recesses of the mind?

Managing Information to Be Remembered

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Memory Medic
What you just learned can interfere with remembering what you are about to learn.

Another Limitless Pill Hits the Market. Does It Deliver?

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on February 10, 2017 in The Fallible Mind
Drugs that modulate cognition work in those who truly need help. While not intended for healthy brains, some continue to rack up glowing testimonials—especially from journalists.

Manipulating Memory With the Mind's Eye

New research suggests that shifting the visual perspective of our autobiographical memories can shape and potentially restructure how we remember.

The Burden of Memory (part 2)

If most of our memories are false, how can we decide who we are?

The Burden of Memory (part 1)

Recent cognitive science supports the view that memories are confabulations of the past rehearsed for the future. What about historical memory?

Janet Jackson Gives Birth at 50: Two Older Mother Pluses

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on February 07, 2017 in Singletons
Waiting to have your babies? It can be difficult and expensive to have babies older, but new research reveals potential benefits.

How Do Neuroplasticity and Neurogenesis Rewire Your Brain?

By Christopher Bergland on February 06, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A groundbreaking new study has identified how the birth of new neurons (neurogenesis) combined with neuroplasticity can rewire the brain and reshape the mind.