Memory makes us. If we couldn't recall the who, what, where, and when of our everyday lives, we would never be able to manage. We mull over ideas in the present with our short-term (or working) memory, while we store past events and learned meanings in our long-term (episodic or semantic) memory.

What's more, memory is malleable–and it tends to decay with age. So stay sharp by reading our articles on the science of recollection.

Recent posts on Memory

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To Sleep, Perhaps to Learn

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Memory Medic
Odds are the kids in your life are not getting enough sleep. Scientists now know that sleep is needed for "smart forgetting."

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

By Christopher Bergland on February 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

Declinism: Why You Think America is in Crisis

Is America really on the brink of disaster? Studies show most people feel things are bad and getting worse. Declinism, based on cognitive bias, explains why.

5 Tips to Tame Word-Finding Difficulties

Frustrated by word-finding difficulties? Harness the hidden opportunity they provide to boost your brain health.

Deep Memories of Insects

By Jeffrey Lockwood Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in The Infested Mind
What creatures infest the dark recesses of the mind?

Managing Information to Be Remembered

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Memory Medic
What you just learned can interfere with remembering what you are about to learn.

Another Limitless Pill Hits the Market. Does It Deliver?

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on February 10, 2017 in The Fallible Mind
Drugs that modulate cognition work in those who truly need help. While not intended for healthy brains, some continue to rack up glowing testimonials—especially from journalists.

Manipulating Memory With the Mind's Eye

New research suggests that shifting the visual perspective of our autobiographical memories can shape and potentially restructure how we remember.

The Burden of Memory (part 2)

If most of our memories are false, how can we decide who we are?

The Burden of Memory (part 1)

Recent cognitive science supports the view that memories are confabulations of the past rehearsed for the future. What about historical memory?

Janet Jackson Gives Birth at 50: Two Older Mother Pluses

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on February 07, 2017 in Singletons
Waiting to have your babies? It can be difficult and expensive to have babies older, but new research reveals potential benefits.

How Do Neuroplasticity and Neurogenesis Rewire Your Brain?

By Christopher Bergland on February 06, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A groundbreaking new study has identified how the birth of new neurons (neurogenesis) combined with neuroplasticity can rewire the brain and reshape the mind.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Remembering

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on February 05, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Dates important to us, holidays, shared memories, details, and agreements bring us opportunities to show love through remembering.

On The Need To Evolutionize Memory Research

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on February 04, 2017 in Pop Psych
Understanding why we remember can help us understand what we remember

President and Chief Story-teller

By Robyn Fivush Ph.D. on February 04, 2017 in The Stories of Our Lives
Through storytelling, we better understand the human experience, learn what is important and valuable in our lives

Questionable Study About Implanting False Memories

By David M. Allen M.D. on February 03, 2017 in A Matter of Personality
A study shown on "Nova" puts a subject in the position of having to call her parents liars. The experimenter ignores her behavior during the study in drawing conclusions.

3 Simple Steps to Boosting Your Brainpower

By Michelle Braun Ph.D, ABPP-CN on February 03, 2017 in Ageless
The secret to improving your memory and reducing your risk of Alzheimer's is closer than you think.

The Morality of Memoir

By Robert N. Kraft Ph.D. on February 03, 2017 in Defining Memories
When recalling our past and telling our lives to others, what obligations do we have to our memories, to our audience, and to the people we are remembering?

Can Slacklining be Good for the Brain?

By Tracy P Alloway Ph.D. on February 01, 2017 in Keep It in Mind
Can slacklining be good for the Brain?

How To Deal With Emotional Triggers

By Barton Goldsmith Ph.D. on January 31, 2017 in Emotional Fitness
Sometimes old memories trigger deep emotional feelings.

Laura (and Emma) and Mary and I

By Susan Hooper on January 30, 2017 in Detours and Tangents
I watched “The Dick Van Dyke Show” as a child, but missed almost all of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” And yet both Laura Petrie and Mary Richards influenced my life.

How Sure Are You About Your Memories?

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on January 28, 2017 in Intentional Insights
Your memories may be lying to you! This article helps you be honest with yourself.

Social Learning: Eyes Provide a Window Into Primate Minds

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on January 25, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Captive gorillas and chimpanzees demonstrate social learning similar to humans. Using cutting-edge eye tracking technology, we can now use primate eyes to see into primate minds.
Gretchen Rubin

A Happy Memory: the “Stripey House” of Kansas City.

By Gretchen Rubin on January 23, 2017 in The Happiness Project
Remembering that funny house brought back happy memories, of all those car trips to the mall with my sister and mother.

The Adaptive Significance Of Priming

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on January 22, 2017 in Pop Psych
Priming does not appear to be a byproduct of neural activation, but rather an adaptive means of improving cognitive and behavioral response times. Implications abound.
W. R. Klemm

Why Music Matters

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on January 21, 2017 in Memory Medic
You haven't outgrown the music of your teenage years. You just need reminding. So when you are down, bring out the CDS and tapes of your favorite music.

J20: Mo(u)rning in America?

Immediate memorials at the sites of sudden death conflate mourning with protest. This blog suggests that the J20 protests protest with mourning.

Physical Fitness Keeps Your Brain in Good Shape, Study Finds

By Christopher Bergland on January 16, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
New groundbreaking research pinpoints specific brain areas that benefit from staying physically fit.

What Molecular Biology Has Neglected in Evolution

Ever wonder how life started? Was DNA really the beginning of life on earth or did life come from outer space?

Mind-Wandering on a Leash

Recent neuroimaging research shows that two distinct, often antagonistic brain networks cooperate to produce creative thinking.