Using Intuition

We think of intuition as a magical phenomenon—but hunches are formed out of our past experiences and knowledge. So while relying on gut feelings doesn't always lead to good decisions, it's not nearly as flighty a tactic as it may sound.

Recent Posts on Intuition

3 Reasons Why Intuition is a Sacred Gift

Give your intuition a chance and you'll give yourself the biggest gift of your life.

Is Life Just a Sequence of Random Events?

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on May 12, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
How do we understand the role of luck in our lives? If value and meaning can only be achieved by a sequence of events, does that sequence reflect a pre-determined pattern? Whose pattern? Where does this line of thinking take us in terms of planning? How are artists and entrepreneurs different from the rest of us? How do we find meaning in life?

Vanishing Twin Syndrome: Your Intuition May Be Right

Intuitions can lead you to surprising discoveries. Trust them, and go find out more....including if you have a hunch that you may once have had a long-lost twin.

A Mother’s Intuition

By Shimi Kang M.D. on May 07, 2015 in The Dolphin Way
Have you ever felt that fluttering feeling in your stomach? The kind that rises up into your chest and makes your heart race and even though you couldn’t possibly have any idea why you’re feeling that way, all you know is that the decision you’re about to make feels either very right or extremely wrong? We all do, and as parents we need to get back in touch with it.

Happy Adolescents

Happiness is always a possibility for those who commit and acquire the necessary know-how. Albeit it is especially challenging for adolescents. Their brains change so furiously, how can they and their parents keep up? Attitudes about this stage have to change. And then comes the approach, teenager approved...

Good Faith

By Russ Gerber on April 22, 2015 in Our Health
Materialism or spirituality? Which way should you go? Which way can you count on?

A Betrayal Anxiety Quiz for Women in an Unequal Workplace

When limited opportunities for advancement in a workplace exist, women often find themselves competing for the few positions available. Oftentimes, women who have been betrayed by ladder climbing colleagues are then prone to sabotage others.

The Experience Machine Reloaded

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in One Among Many
In a famous thought experiment, philosopher Robert Nozick tried to refute hedonism, or the idea that pleasure is the best and pain is the worst. But not so fast, please.

The Difference Between Healthy and Unhealthy Passion

By Gregg Levoy on April 10, 2015 in Passion!
Passion can be either beneficial or detrimental, life-giving or life-denying. And it can share a border with mania. Here’s how to tell whether your passion for work and life is healthy or not.

Let’s Play: How the Science of the Brain Is Changing Therapy

I recently attended a conference at UCLA entitled: Play, Creativity, Mindfulness and Neuroscience in Psychotherapy. The conference offered an approach that has been gaining increasing importance, namely that: “Throughout the lifespan, play supports neurological growth and development while building complex, skilled, flexible, responsive and socially adept brains."

Are Video Games Making People Sexist?

By Jesse Marczyk on April 09, 2015 in Pop Psych
What approximately 800 Germans can tell us about the long-term effects of video games on sexist attitudes

How to Fix Any Problem: The 3 Step Approach

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on April 08, 2015 in Fixing Families
While the content of the problems we are forced to deal with every day constantly changes, the basic approach we need to put the problem to rest is always the same. Here are the three steps.

The Zen of Love

What propels a person to leave the beaten path and try something new? We seem to be predetermined by our early experiences, especially when it comes to abuse and neglect. Yet, some people free themselves of their conditioning and leap into something they have never encountered: love. Little do we comprehend when it comes to leaps, but what we know may just be a good start.

Employee Conflict: Fighters vs. Flighters

Categorizing your workforce with this simple "psychology" may not be scientifically accurate, but it can help keep you sane.

Should We Call it Postpartum Depression?

For reasons that are both straightforward and extremely complex, I just think the terminology should be different.

Announcing a New Journal in Psychology

By Jesse Marczyk on March 31, 2015 in Pop Psych
It's time to fix the false positive problem in psychology.

3 Ways Your Romantic Instincts Can Lead You Astray

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in In Love and War
Romantic instincts are subject to a number of biases that can lead us to trust the wrong people and overlook the right ones.

The Real Reason People Think Promiscuity Is Wrong

Why do many people think promiscuity is morally wrong? STDs may sound like the simplest explanation, but it's probably not the correct one.

Surprise

By The Book Brigade on March 26, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Surprise is good for the brain, great for relationships, and adds a certain frisson all around. Without it, life is lackluster. So why don't more people embrace the unexpected? They run from it or try to subdue it when they should instead roll with it.

The Mach 1 Experience: 6 Keys to Successful Risk-Taking

By Gregg Levoy on March 18, 2015 in Passion!
There’s no risk without fear, but living a passionate life means pushing yourself through your resistance. These 6 insights about successful risk-taking can help you jump-start your engines.

Treating William Shakespeare

Asking which of the things I did that worked and which didn’t is exactly the same as asking which things the patient does in response I should feel rewarded by.

Ten Things to Help You Be More Creative

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 17, 2015 in A Sideways View
Can you really teach creativity? If so, what is it we need to do?

Are Patients Harmed When Doctors Explain Things too Simply?

By Peter A. Ubel on March 17, 2015 in Critical Decisions
Sometimes fast-thinking is not so good. Which raises an interesting question for physicians trying to help patients navigate important medical decisions: Will they harm patients by explaining things so simply that patients make fast, erroneous choices?

Why?

In Curiosity, Manguel draws on scores of writers and texts, especially Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy, to find fresh ways to ask fundamental questions: Who am I? Why do things happen? What comes next? Elegant and erudite, his book is a celebration of critical reading, a challenging, enjoyable and essential craft that is in danger these days of becoming a lost art.

Healing the Wounded Heart

Karen, a psychiatric nurse, connects her personal insecurity with the early loss of her Mother. As her therapist, I decide to self disclose that I became a young widow, and I understand. Together, we consider life after loss.

Five Ways to Access Your Unconscious Intelligence

Overthinking kills our intuitive sense. Find out how to relax and trust your gut feelings to your and other people's benefit. Soon enough, you are going to burst with creative solutions....

The Difference Between Knowledge and Wisdom

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Ambigamy
Knowledge is knowing; Wisdom is wondering still. Those who stay wise have high Returns On Divestment, experience getting a good payoff from changing their minds.

The Logical Genealogy of Mr. Spock

By Matthew Shanahan M.Sc. on March 04, 2015 in Living It
A method of logically synthesizing parent values as a key to children's identity choices

Getting Rid of Your Feelings: Does It Help?

Because feelings can be so overwhelming, we often have the misconception that the best way to deal with them is to get rid of them. We imagine that life would be so much easier if we could just shut them down entirely and for good.

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 2 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." This is part 2 of a 3-part post explaining why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.