Using Intuition

We think of intuition as a magical phenomenon—but hunches are formed out of our past experiences and knowledge. So while relying on gut feelings doesn't always lead to good decisions, it's not nearly as flighty a tactic as it may sound.

Recent posts on Intuition

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The Shadow in a Selfie

By Elizabeth Young on September 18, 2017 in Adaptations
Silence was the main means of communication about the deep, sharp tensions that sliced the fabric of family life.

How Speaking a Second Language Affects the Way You Think

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 09, 2017 in Talking Apes
The effort of speaking a second language impacts decision-making processes, but in unexpected ways.

The War on Experts

By Gary Klein Ph.D. on September 06, 2017 in Seeing What Others Don't
Countering the exaggerated claims of researchers in the fields of Decision Making, Heuristics and Biases, Evidence-Based Performance, Sociology, and Information Technology.
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The Silent Treatment: How Silence Amplifies Your Callings

By Gregg Levoy on August 26, 2017 in Passion!
It’s often in silence that you figure out what you have to say to the world, get a bead on your passions and the source of those passions.

The Art of Persusasion

By Charles S. Jacobs on August 22, 2017 in Management Rewired
A simple set of psychological principles can ensure that you always get your own way.

Do You Have Any Idea What Causes a Solar Eclipse?

By Andrew Shtulman Ph.D. on August 14, 2017 in Inconceivable
The U.S. is preparing for a solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, an event that is not only rare but also counterintuitive.

The Psychology of First Impressions

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 08, 2017 in Talking Apes
Researchers identify four facial features that drive our first impressions of others.

Cognitizing a Scenario

"Cognitizing" a scenario taps into behind-the-scenes mental activities such as reading a situation and picking up on subtle cues. It's about how to think, not just what to do.

Seeing the Sky as a Copernican

We are not naturally inclined to perceive the world in conformity with even our most familiar and well-learned scientific commitments.

If You Love Someone, Wish Them (Occasional) Bad Luck

Chief Justice Roberts' speech highlights the power of personal experience.

The Cognitive Audit

Ten cognitive requirements designed to help instructors inject cognitive skills into their training programs.

Wonder Woman and Wondering

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 26, 2017 in Ambigamy
Everyone is motivated by inspirational movies. This should cause us to wonder more about their lessons, like believing in yourself or that love is the answer.

A Possible Sign from God That He (It) Exists

By Izzy Kalman on June 14, 2017 in Resilience to Bullying
Could it be that a familiar cosmic illusion considered by scientists to be a pure coincidence is actually a clever sign from God to mankind that He exists?

Making a Molehill out of a Mountain

We don’t have to believe everything we think. We can choose to accentuate the positive by doing what works and focusing our attention on that which is fulfilling.

Mapping the Sources of Power

The 1998 map of our cognitive sources of power still seems relevant. However, an updated version distinguishes the knowledge that we acquire from ways we can apply that knowledge.

Is It Possible to Teach Yourself to Read Minds?

Why are some people better at reading minds than others? A few simple techniques can help you develop this capability too.

Games Master Manipulators Play: Boundary Blindness

How to know when your personal boundaries are being crossed, and what to do about it.

Quarks, Quasars and the Mind: Stranger Than We Suppose

By Steve Stankevicius M.D. on May 09, 2017 in The Skeptical Shrink
Any account of the mind that conveniently dovetails with our common sense should be met with skepticism.

Here's How to Feel Satisfied With Your Life Decisions

By Caroline Beaton on April 29, 2017 in The Gen-Y Guide
Modern psychology offers three ways to make peace with your decisions.

Positive Heuristics

Researchers are looking at heuristics the wrong way — as sources of bias and error. In fact, they are powerful strategies for making inferences under uncertainty and ambiguity.

A Practical Guide to Not Settling

What if the people that shape our world for the better are no smarter than we are – as Steve Jobs believed? How do they find the path to extraordinary accomplishment?

Could a Blood Test for Cancer Be Dangerous?

By Theodora Ross M.D. PhD. on March 29, 2017 in A Cancer in the Family
Early cancer detection seems right. But it can, in reality, be wrong.

Why the Best Relationships Don't Follow the Golden Rule

By David Ludden Ph.D. on March 20, 2017 in Talking Apes
According to recent research, to get what you want out of a relationship, you first have to give your partner what they want.

Do Only Dead Fish Swim With the Stream?

Many people's long-term romantic behavior is similar to dead fish floating with the current, slowly drifting with the stream. Is such behavior damaging? Not always, it would seen.

4 Steps to Making Better Decisions

Our inner wisdom is an invaluable tool in making decisions.

Knowing Oneself Is Easier Said Than Done

By Graham Collier on February 21, 2017 in The Consciousness Question
There is no guarantee you will ever completely know just who and why you are.

Experimental Philosophy: Strengths and Limitations

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Hot Thought
Experimental philosophy is an important movement in which philosophers systematically collect data about how people think. It has 2 main strengths and 3 surmountable limitations.

Anticipation

By Gary Klein Ph.D. on February 08, 2017 in Seeing What Others Don't
Anticipatory thinking is the way we imagine how unexpected events may affect our plans, alerting us to potential threats. But what are the dysfunctional tendencies that block it?

Royally Bad Philosophy (A Reply to Craig and Colbert)

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on February 07, 2017 in A Logical Take
The cosmological argument ("why is there something rather than nothing") is not nearly as strong as many suppose.