Coping With Grief

Coping with losing a loved one is one of life's great difficulties. If you have experienced the pain of mourning, you know that any way to ease the loss is welcomed. While our knowledge and study of grief continues to evolve, it's important to note that not everyone grieves the same way: We have individual patterns and outlets for grief.

Recent posts on Grief

How to Leave a Toxic Relationship and Still Love Yourself

"I am leaving you for me. Whether I am incomplete or you are incomplete is irrelevant. Relationships can only be built with two wholes..."

The Children of 9/11: 16 Years On

By Adam Gerace Ph.D. on September 12, 2017 in Knowing Me, Knowing You
Thousands of children lost a parent on 9/11. More than a decade-and-a-half on, their stories are emerging.

52 Ways: A Story of Showing Love Through Food

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on September 10, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Feeding others shows love by providing for, nourishing, seducing, or delighting.

Death, Grief and Pasta

Being distracted or spacy is part of grieving and that’s normal
Bob McMillan via Wikimedia Commons

Ambiguous Loss

By Marilyn A. Mendoza Ph.D. on September 05, 2017 in Understanding Grief
Coping when someone is missing

Grieving the End of a Relationship

The emotional responses to a thorny breakup can resemble the responses to the death of a loved one.

Four Big Psychological Catastrophes We All Want to Avoid

By Kevin Bennett on September 01, 2017 in Modern Minds
Many residents along the Texas coast will be facing a long road to psychological recovery. Here are four types of loss to watch out for in the aftermath of disasters.

How Fear of Loss Can Sabotage Love

By Randi Gunther Ph.D. on August 31, 2017 in Rediscovering Love
In observing those who do intentionally invest more in life and love after loss, I now understand what three combinations of attitudes and behaviors they have in common.

Beyond the Breath: The Promise and Perils of Compassion

Experiential techniques can deepen our mindfulness practice and help us get unstuck from painful patterns.

Tell Your Story, Change Your Life

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on August 25, 2017 in Creating in Flow
Writing about loss can change your life in a positive way. Consider the five stages to writing and healing as explained in this guest post by Sandra Marinella.

A Mindful Meditation on the Mysteries of Life, for Children

Even very young children can worry about death, birth, and change. And So It Goes is a delightful illustrated book for children who have questions about the mysteries of life.

Are You Wired for Resilience?

If you knew you had the resilience to recover from almost any challenge or experience, what might you do differently? Would you finally start living the life you most want?
Ryan McGuire/Gratisography

A Sacred Circle

By Elizabeth Young on August 17, 2017 in Adaptations
Everyone took her neighbors' hands and the circle steadied and tightened: we created and held that sacred space.

Sticky, Tricky, and Icky: Unconscious Parent-Child Dynamics

Emotional abandonment may manifest in parental coldness, but when the dynamic is operative, both parent and young child believe it is they who are internally, irreparably flawed.
Munch 1893, PD

Professional Suicide

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on August 17, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Even great men with ground-breaking accomplishments can experience circumstances that break their spirit.
Ryan McGuire/Gratisography

What We Leave Behind

By Elizabeth Young on August 16, 2017 in Adaptations
Women in a therapeutic writing group discover that adaptation includes grieving parts of themselves that they have to leave behind.

Death May Be More Positive for the Dying Than We Expect

By Art Markman Ph.D. on August 08, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
It seems straightforward to say that death is scary and bad. Many people express that they have a fear of death. Do people nearing death express lots of fear and anxiety?
 Matus Laslofi/Flickr/CC by 2.0

30 Reasons You May Need a Grief Therapist

Are you stuck in your grief?

We Can Break Without Shattering

By Sara Gluck, PhD, LCSW on August 06, 2017 in Do Your Own Think
Have you been trying to block out those feelings of hurt, regret, betrayal or heartbreak? Gritting your teeth and embracing the pain can actually be the first step to healing.

Sentience is Everywhere: Indeed, It's an Inconvenient Truth

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on August 06, 2017 in Animal Emotions
In a piece called Studies in Sentience Tell Us Ours is a World of Many Centres, Arita Joshi rightfully argues that sentience can be found in all sorts of beings. We are not alone.

The Irony of Physician Suicide

Are physicians who die by suicide, and their families, subject to higher stigma?

Mourning a Young Life

I went to a funeral this weekend for a woman whose bright life ended far too soon. As I sat there, steeped in grief, I reflected again, anew, on how religion is dance.

Zeus or Sisyphus?: A Tale of Couples Therapy

By Marty Babits on July 27, 2017 in The Middle Ground
With Zeus wielding power to create anything and Sisyphus, trapped in eternal futility, how can a couples therapist help break this deadlock?

Option B and Option Buddha—Sheryl Sandberg and Kisa Gotami

A review of Sandberg's Option B, and some lessons from Buddhism about grief and mortality.

Losing a Pregnancy Only to Lose One Again

Recurrent pregnancy loss is an isolating and traumatic experience for many.
Kristin A. Meekhof

Please Stop Telling People to "Let Go" of Their Loss

Perhaps, it is time to stop telling the bereaved to "let go" of their loss.

Dealing with the Death of a Child

By Kenneth J. Doka Ph.D. on July 10, 2017 in Good Mourning
Do parents soon divorce after a child dies? What effects does the death of a child have on family systems? How can families cope with such a traumatic loss?

Animal Heartbreak: Each Individual's Feelings Matter to Them

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 08, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Two things people misunderstand about animals is that each individual’s feelings are important to them and "smarter" animals don't suffer more than "less intelligent" animals.

Why the Five Stages of Grief Are Wrong

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on July 07, 2017 in Supersurvivors
Despite our society’s widespread belief that grief proceeds in five simple stages, research shows that this isn’t the case. So what is true?