Coping With Grief

Coping with losing a loved one is one of life's great difficulties. If you have experienced the pain of mourning, you know that any way to ease the loss is welcomed. While our knowledge and study of grief continues to evolve, it's important to note that not everyone grieves the same way: We have individual patterns and outlets for grief.

Recent Posts on Grief

Finding Silver Linings in Hard Times

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in In Love and War
Major negative life events, such as the death of a loved one, the dissolution of an important relationship, or the diagnosis of a serious illness, can be painful and isolating. But these experiences can also sometimes bring about unexpected positive changes.

It's Beautiful

There can be both Beauty and Meaning in Loss

Two Things Children Should Know about Grief

By Nancy Berns Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Freedom to Grieve
Do not think you have to have all the pain go away before you can have fun or even just go about your ordinary routine. You are not being disloyal to the person you miss if you are experiencing joy.

Bethlehem: A Subjective Travelogue

My love of the capacity of the human spirit to transcend all odds soared as I munched on a traditional oven-baked lamb dish. Across from me sat one of Holy Land Trust’s core team members, telling me bits of his story of opening up to the vision that fuels the organization. As hard as it was to be there, it was also a tiny slice of what’s humanly possible.

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

Sometimes it is impossible to let go of grief. When you continue to grieve a loss, your condition is called complicated grief. Complicated grief is so severe that psychiatrists now consider it for inclusion in the psychiatric manual for diagnosing mental disorders. Here is how to tell if you suffer from complicated grief.

Redditor to Redditor

Young men are finding new ways to reach out to each other and older generations for advice and mentorship.

Why Some People Let Us Down When We Need Them

If someone has experienced a particular event, they’ll sympathize with those going through the same experience. But those who have gotten through difficult situations tend to be the harshest judges of those who fail under similar circumstances.

Gracing Clients’ Lives

Boomer died suddenly at age 9, leaving a trail of progeny and well wishes for his therapy work with clients.

Alienated Grandparents

Alienated grandparents suffer tremendous loss and emotional suffering.

Bullying: A Case Study Revisited

They delighted in their own cleverness, and in their ability to get many uninvolved bystanders to sing a chorus as they waited in the food line. In other words, the humiliation of one girl became a popular bonding experience, and ad-libbing new lyrics was a way to get positive peer attention.

Ambushed by Eldercare? You’re Not Alone

How to handle the multiple challenges of eldercare.

What to Do When Life Is Short

Dual citizenship as a doctor and as a seriously ill patient had taught him that respectful communication is the bedrock of all medicine.

John Joseph Shows Us Why Healthy Living Is Pure Hardcore

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in Brick by Brick
The Cro-Mags' John Joseph shows us that coping with difficult situations can be hard, but healthy living is the ultimate strategy.

Dealing with Unexpected Loss

Dealing with loss is always emotionally challenging. Whether we are offering support to family, friends, and coworkers who have been intimately affected, or grieving as an entire nation, there are some specific dynamics to consider when addressing loss that is so sudden.

If I Talk to a Therapist Will I Stop Speaking to My Parents?

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on April 04, 2015 in Off the Couch
A young man walked into my office for his first therapy session. “If I start talking to you, am I going to end up not talking to my parents?” he asked.

The Paradox of Self-Pity

Everybody knows someone who's steeped in the language of self-pity. All they talk about is how rough they have it. They constantly seek sympathy, to the point where they turn others off. But contrary to what they're putting out there, such people usually have no real sympathy for themselves.

The "Lightbulb Effect"

By Randi Kreger on April 02, 2015 in Stop Walking on Eggshells
"Over the next three weeks I read the book "The Verbally Abusive Relationship." I was astounded at how accurately it portrayed our relationship. I saw us on nearly every single page. What a wake-up call! For the first time, I saw your behavior for what it was. More importantly, I saw that I didn't deserve to be treated that way."

The Fastest Way to Get Over It

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 01, 2015 in Ambigamy
Grief, mourning, grudges—necessary but man, can they suck away the years and we don't get that many years anyway you cut it. Here are a few fast-acting poems that can keep the sucking to a minimum.

Loves Lost: One Troubled Pilot Brings Grieving to Many

One wonders how many words were left unspoken by those who boarded the plane? Will those left behind expressed gratitude because their last moments together were a blessing? Or did they part with an unkind word or look that can never be repaired?

5 Signs That Seeking Help May Benefit You

People often get stressed, have problems with others, or have problems coping with life. Yet many don't seek professional help. Here are some ideas about when therapy may benefit you or your family.

Can You Ever Mend A Broken Heart?

Animals and people can die of a broken heart. The pain and grief we feel when we lose a loved one activates some of the same brain areas as those that formed that love in the first place. Moving forward with the scars of loves we have lost can make us wary of opening up to new relationships.

Good Friday, Good Grief

By Nancy Berns Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in Freedom to Grieve
Too often, church services or conversations with Christians do not give enough time for expressions of pain, loss, and grief. We want to rush to the happy stuff. We want to convince ourselves and others that life is all good. But life can be really hard.

What Pet Owners Can't Know About Their Pets

By Peg Streep on March 31, 2015 in Tech Support
Dog owners universally ascribe complex emotions to their furry companions. But what's really going on? Do dogs feel what we think they feel or are we all just projecting?

A Prayer for My Aunt

By Susan Hooper on March 30, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
My mother's younger sister often seemed angry with the world. In her last months, as she battled the physical and mental indignities of old age, I saw a new sweetness of character, along with the iron strength that had sustained her through her life's tribulations.

Changes in the Family: Impact on Sexual Development

In modern times, the family unit has been dramatically reconstructed. Regardless of the family’s formation, the behaviors observed by children of both single and two-parent families significantly impact children’s sexual development.

Back in the Swim

Ambivalent about permission to move on with her life after early widowhood, Angie has spent three years going through classic stages of grieving. As a widow, I understand and help her to free her energies to move into warm weather with a spring in her step.

It’s Complicated: Ten Years After

By A Guest Blogger on March 27, 2015 in The Guest Room
Grief is a fickle and complicated lifelong journey that can assault its victims with debilitating symptoms at any time after its origin. Understanding that grief knows no time limit can ease the path toward acceptance.

Affairs: The Healing Process

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on March 26, 2015 in Fixing Families
Affairs are devastating on so many levels, but at its core it is about trust and loss. A map for moving through the normal healing process.

What Makes You Say You’re Lonely?

By Peter Toohey on March 26, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
What does it mean to be lonely and how do say that you are lonely? Is language enough to describe it? Are you lonely just because you think you are lonely and say you are lonely? Or are specific circumstances required for there to be loneliness? What does loneliness mean for the animal and human brain? Is loneliness and the word “loneliness” common to all cultures?

Principles of Parting

By Wendy Paris on March 24, 2015 in Splitopia
Create principles of parting to help you adhere to your values, manifest your strengths and move through divorce more smoothly.