All About Extroversion

Extroverts make up about three-quarters of the American population, and as such come in all stripes. They zip through the world in search of novel experiences, social connections, and leadership opportunities. Extroversion is a core factor of personality and is difficult to modify. But generally speaking, the only people bothered by extroverts' volubility and drive are the introverted members of their circle!

Recent Posts on Extroversion

Do Dog Owners Make Better Lovers? Some Scientific Answers

By Peg Streep on July 30, 2015 in Tech Support
Some studies have shown that dog owners like to dominate but that they're also more sociable than people without pets or people who prefer cats. But did you know that the presence of a dog changes how we assess someone, even a stranger? That and more....

Donald Trump and Our Obsession With Narcissistic Leaders

By Ray Williams on July 28, 2015 in Wired for Success
Americans are obsessed with narcissistic leaders, or at least they have an ambivalence between the ones they like and the ones they promote.

Regional Differences in Personality: Surprising Findings

Individual personality traits and the geographic region where one lives are correlated with important social outcomes. Research has found that personality traits are also geographically clustered in ways correlated with these same outcomes. Some of the results are surprising as the individual level and societal level correlates of personality can differ strikingly.

Dogs Can Predict Human Personality Traits

The symbiotic relationship between dogs and their owners has developed to the point where dogs can predict personality traits.

3 Lessons Everyone Should Learn From Introverts

By Jen Kim on June 01, 2015 in Valley Girl With a Brain
Whether you're an introvert or an extrovert, everyone can benefit from being quiet and thoughtful.

Reflections on ‘Montage of Heck’

Cobain is the poster child for emotional devastation. And yet, at the same time, there is something in his music which resonates powerfully with his generation. This documentary affords us a view as to how it all got established and played itself out – his pain, his shame, his his inability to relate, his drug addiction, his art, his suicide.

Do You Have the Personality of a Neanderthal?

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Almost all of us have some Neanderthal in us. What can that tell us about how these ancient cousins of ours thought?

The Expert's Guide to People Watching

The art of people watching most likely dates back to earliest civilization. Putting psychology’s knowledge about nonverbal behavior to use can help you become a pro at this basic human pastime.

When Introverts and Extroverts Attract

If your love interest is your polar opposite, here are a few things you should know about introversion and extroversion.

Do We Necessarily Need to Be Social Animals?

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 06, 2015 in How To Do Life
An internal debate on how social to be, in and outside of work.

Do Promiscuous People Really Have Fewer Friends?

By Zhana Vrangalova Ph.D. on April 06, 2015 in Strictly Casual
Promiscuity is highly stigmatized in our culture and we often believe that promiscuous people are socially ostracized and lonely. But while slut-shaming can be a serious problem and promiscuous people suffer more interpersonal discrimination and victimization, a new study shows they actually have more friends and feel less lonely.

4 Ways to Boost Your Charisma

Most people think that charisma is a mysterious quality that people are born with. However, there has been a century of research on charisma, and nearly a half-century focusing specifically on what makes a person charismatic. As a result of this work, we can measure and enhance charisma.

The Attractiveness of Personality Traits

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 02, 2015 in A Sideways View
Some traits are more attractive than others. But there are downsides to all extreme scorers. Is there a downside to being a sociable extravert or a highly agreeable person?

The Surprising Psychology of BDSM Players

By Michael Castleman M.A. on April 01, 2015 in All About Sex
Contrary to the portrayal of Christian Grey in "Fifty Shades of Grey," BDSM aficionados are psychologically normal and healthy.

How Young Is Too Young?

Do you remember feeling pressure as a child to do better at school, fit in socially, or behave more appropriately? Making the right decision was not always as easy as adults and cheerful children's books sometimes painted it. Luckily, stumbling slow motion through a decade or so of dysfunctional days (aka natural childhood development) was an expected and accepted part...

Do Orcas Go Crazy Because of Petting Pools and False Hopes?

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in Animal Emotions
Orcas who lived in petting pools show higher levels of aggression than other killer whales. This essay lays out the details of what is known about aggressive encounters and early experience. It is objectively clear that there is a correlation between “petting pool” history and significant later orca aggression. Now we need to know more about why this is so.

Ice Breakers: How to Warm Up a Training Group

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in A Sideways View
There are some really interesting psychological games and exercises which can help you get any group going? Here, four of the best are described

What We Need Most From a Relationship

When you think about your ideal romantic partner, it’s not hard to generate that list of traits that describes your dream man or woman. And the closer your current partner is to those ideals, the happier you’ll be. But not all ideals are created equal. Partners who meet your ideals on certain types of traits are more likely to make you happy.

The Interpersonal Consequences of Schizophrenia

This article is comprised of an argument that introversion, divergent thinking, and isolation, as qualities in the schizophrenic individual, may be causally related to the emergence of schizophrenia.

Sparkle Versus Glow—and What That Means For Your Love Life

By Ken Page L.C.S.W. on March 14, 2015 in Finding Love
I recently had a dialogue with Sophia Dembling, author of Introverts in Love: The Quiet Way to Happily Ever After. Both of us had books come out at about the same time concerning the search for love. Her insights on the distinction between glow and sparkle hold one of the greatest keys to finding and keeping healthy love.

How to Parent

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 06, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Parenting, then and now.

An OCEAN Far Away: Big 5 Personality Factors in Star Wars

Which Star Wars characters characters are the most open to experience while others are set in their ways? Who's the most conscientious or lackadaisy? Who are the extraverts, who's most agreeable, and who's most neurotic? Help rate the characters in order to find out together.

Online Dating: The Dark Side

By Martin Graff Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Love, Digitally
These people use devious psychological ploys. Have you ever been suspicious about an online relationship?

Who Was George Washington?

By Gregg Henriques on February 22, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
An analysis of George Washington's character and relational strivings on what would have been his 283rd birthday.

He Who Loves Will Be Conditioned to Show it

Love is not a disposition but it can occur below conscious awareness.

3 Good Reasons to Wallow in Despair

By Tina Gilbertson LPC on February 18, 2015 in Constructive Wallowing
Do you feel blue sometimes and don't know why? Find out how those so-called "negative" feelings can be the key to greater happiness and well-being.

There Is a New Paradigm for Psychiatry

The hope for a molecular-biochemical explanation for psychiatry is false. It is believed we are on the verge of proving that psychiatry is a brain disease, no different from cancer or diabetes. But there is a paradigm that fully illuminates psychiatry - the ‘Play of consciousness, which is consonant with biology, neuroscience, and evolutution.

Personality Traits of BDSM Practitioners: Another Look

A recent study provides some new insights into the personality traits of dominant and submissive BDSM practitioners. Dominant practitioners seem to be more calm and have a greater desire for control, while submissive ones may be more emotional and introverted. Some questions remain about how these findings compare to previous studies into this fascinating world.

Why Couples Need Other Couples

By Geoffrey Greif Ph.D. on February 10, 2015 in Buddy System
Couples should consider spending Valentine's Day with another couple they both admire and respect. Seeing a spouse/partner happy in a couple's friendship can make that spouse/partner even more attractive.