Driving cars and living in high-rise apartments are relatively new experiences for the human species, but they demonstrate that we are particularly good at adapting to a diverse range of landscapes. Environmental psychology explores how physical spaces influence the way we feel, think, and interact with the world. Specialists in the field investigate everything from stressful designs in urban landscapes to the therapeutic effects of the outdoors on children.

Recent posts on Environment

Agitating for the Environment

One place to take on global environmental stewardship may be your own laundry room. Remarkably, the spotlight now is not on detergents or bleach, but rather on the apparel itself.

Morality: Seeds Must Be Planted Rightly in Early LIfe

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on April 23, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
It’s easy to believe that reasoning is the most important aspect of morality. But it isn't. Morality "goes all the way down" to how well our neurobiological systems work.

An Earth Day Wake-Up Call Delivered Via Hawk

By Shawn M. Burn Ph.D. on April 22, 2017 in Presence of Mind
Earth Day is a good day to consider (or reconsider) your commitment to promoting environmental sustainability.

Please Yell at Me

By Asa Don Brown Ph.D. on April 21, 2017 in Towards Recovery
Have you ever found yourself uncontrollably yelling?

This Earth Day

By The Research Lab on April 20, 2017 in The Fundamentals
When science and politics collide. By Tim Beach, Ph.D.
Yvonne Temal

How Mother Nature Became My Therapy

Escaping into nature can help us recover from our depression and anxiety while simultaneously allowing us to be free. "The mountains are calling and I must go..." -John Muir.

Why Do Some People Deny Climate Change?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on April 17, 2017 in ExperiMentations
How can people deny climate change? The evidence is extremely strong, and the danger is clear and present. Research gives clues as to what factors are really at play.

Fallingwater: Where Design, Structure, & Psychology Converge

Asked to describe Fallingwater in one word, its owner replied, "Romance." Frank Lloyd Wright used design and structure to evoke psychological reactions.
"Emotion Sensation," Frank John Ninivaggi, oil, 2006

Emotions as Our Mother Tongue

We strive for competency. We want a better quality of life. To achieve this, our second language, thought, not only needs but demands its mother language—emotion.

Aphrodite and Dionysus

Lack of or a low sexual desire is the most common sexual challenge, about which physicians hear numerous complaints.

Diagnoses: Harmful or Helpful?

Mental illness can tell us what's wrong with a person, with parenting, with a culture, and with society. It's bio/psycho/social. Let's learn fully about ourselves from it.

The Nature of a Dog's Eye Can Make Problem-Solving Difficult

Dogs have limited visual abilities when compared to humans, and this may make solving certain problems difficult.

Estrogen Promise

By Robert J King Ph.D. on April 11, 2017 in Hive Mind
Have the rumors of the death of testosterone been somewhat exaggerated? In a word: Yes.
Twinsterphoto/Shutterstock.com

Mental Health in the Workplace

Think employee recognition doesn't matter? Think again.

When Effects Are Invisible: From Comfort to Freedom

What is it that makes the existing global system continue to function with our ongoing participation, when so many of us know how close to the edge of catastrophe we are?

We Can Lead the Way to a Nuclear Renaissance

By The Research Lab on April 10, 2017 in The Fundamentals
Reinventing nuclear power to be clean, safe, reliable. By Robert Hebner, Ph.D.

Victim of Biology and Circumstance?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 10, 2017 in Memory Medic
People have underestimated their capacity to sculpt their own brains, attitudes, and behavior by controlling experiences that affect gene expression.

Psychological Consequences of Having Tree-Dwelling Ancestors

Renowned evolutionist Gordon Gallup has extensively studied the psychological correlates of handgrip strength. To understand why, we need to look to our arboreal past.

The Power of Awe: "A Star Is Born" Images and the Small Self

New mind-blowing photographs of a star being born 500 years ago reaffirm the "awesome" power of nature to promote self-transcendence, the small self, and prosocial behaviors.

Can Religious Identity Inspire Pro-Environmental Action?

Religious identity can shape worldviews, build community, and provide networks of communication. So why is it so hard to motivate adherents to take pro-environmental action?

Rising Seas

There are four steps we must take today.

The Psychology of Queuing

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 04, 2017 in A Sideways View
Why is waiting in line so miserable?

Psychotherapist as a Dance Archeologist

By Karen L Smith MSS, LCSW on April 03, 2017 in Full Living
An explanation through metaphor of why we repeat patterns from our families of origin and how therapy helps us change that.

How Climate Change Affects Mental Health

A new report offers evidence that our psyches are as vulnerable as our earth is to global warming.

10 Ways to Protect the Brain from Daily Screen Time

You may have heard that screen-time can wreak havoc on children's nervous systems. But aside from restricting technology, what can parents do to buffer against overstimulation?

Spaces That Set You Free

By Carrie Barron M.D. on March 31, 2017 in The Creativity Cure
The impact of architecture and design on mood and well-being.

The Head-in-the-Sand President

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on March 29, 2017 in The Green Mind
Ignorance may be bliss, but only for a moment. When Trump ignores or deletes climate data, he imperils the planet and all of us.

Connecting Spaces

If you can't knock down any walls, but want an open floor plan, don't lose heart. Use color, scents, light, furniture, and a few design tricks to unite separate spaces.

Beef Down, Atmosphere Up

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on March 25, 2017 in The Green Mind
You can feel the benefits of eating less meat, but you should also be aware that it’s a boon to the planet.

Anxiety Is a Part of Human Nature

Is there a right way to be anxious? Kierkegaard thought so.