Driving cars and living in high-rise apartments are relatively new experiences for the human species, but they demonstrate that we are particularly good at adapting to a diverse range of landscapes. Environmental psychology explores how physical spaces influence the way we feel, think, and interact with the world. Specialists in the field investigate everything from stressful designs in urban landscapes to the therapeutic effects of the outdoors on children.

Recent posts on Environment

Homeless, Mentally Ill and Neglected

When the symptoms of mental illness are acute, they affect an individual’s decision-making capacity. Our failure to provide treatment to those in need is discrimination..

Don’t Bee Afraid

By Jeffrey Lockwood Ph.D. on August 26, 2016 in The Infested Mind
Not only are bee stings painful, but they can be deadly—and we all know this! So why would a beekeeper wear shorts and work without a veil?

The Therapeutic Value of Nature

By Dan Mager MSW on August 26, 2016 in Some Assembly Required
Research suggests that spending time in nature can be extremely beneficial, leading to improvements in mood, cognition, and health.

Are Conservatives More Anti-Science Than Liberals?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 26, 2016 in Talking Apes
Skepticism about scientific findings depends on your core beliefs, not your level of science literacy.

Psychological and Environmental Aspects of Who We Eat

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on August 26, 2016 in Animal Emotions
"Meat Climate Change: The 2nd Leading Cause of Global Warming" highlights the incredible damage agricultural practices do to our planet and psyches and offers viable solutions.

Unattended Children, Harm, and the Nature of Moral Judgment

New research explains why people are quick to condemn those who leave their children unattended.

Curious About Cuba?

By Marty Babits on August 18, 2016 in The Middle Ground
Cuba will bring you to your senses! Mindfulness and aliveness join hands in the jewel of the Caribbean. Experience the transformation in the island and in yourself.

The Joys of Going Off the Map

By Melody Warnick on August 17, 2016 in This Is Where You Belong
Can you navigate from point A to point B without a GPS? Allowing yourself to get distracted might help.

Who Deserves the Right to Choose Green?

By Michele Wick Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Anthropocene Mind
People who earned their income, as opposed to receiving welfare, were deemed more deserving of the right to spend extra cash to cool the planet.

Being Something vs. Doing Something

If the ancient world was over-personalized, than today personal and family life face the threat of becoming ‘professionalized.’
Adrian Michael/Wikipedia, public domain

Why Aren't We Doing Less With More?

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on August 15, 2016 in Cui Bono
New technologies allow to complete tasks much more quickly, potentially providing us with enormous amounts of free time. So why do we fill that time with more work instead of play?

Air Travel and the Speed of Global Warming

Air travel is about time—departure, arrivals, delays, and waiting. But the way we currently travel provides no time to think about how we also live at the speed of global warming

How We Color Our Lives With the Emotions We Desire

By Marianna Pogosyan Ph.D. on August 15, 2016 in Between Cultures
"Ideal affect" offers insights into the complexities of our emotional worlds, our preferences and our behaviors.

The Psychological Roots of Pokémon Go

Pokémon Go scratches some basic psychological itches

Go Wild and Grow Happy, Part 2

What went right in the hunter-gatherer life? We don't have to suffer from depression and anxiety. Here are some simple ways to live a more natural life and re-invite "being here."
L Breuning

Why Winning Feels Good

The facts of our brain’s natural competitiveness have been submerged by a warm and fuzzy view of nature. The truth can help us manage our quirky neurochemical operating system.

Ignoring Social Context in Studies of Borderline Personality

Whether an individual seems to be overly cautious or overly optimistic regarding their expectations of others is determined by experience and learning, not by brain abnormalities.

A Wolf Is a Dog Is a Coyote Is a Jackal Is a Dingo

By Mark Derr on August 09, 2016 in Dog's Best Friend
Coyotes, it turns out, are basically wolves—and so are dogs.

Labeling Non-Native Animals: The Psychology of Name Calling

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on August 08, 2016 in Animal Emotions
The ways we refer to other animals influence how we treat them. Recent assaults on non-natives, often called invasive, can have dire consequences for the animals and ecosystems.

Warming and Cooling With Color

Color has power, and it can be harnessed for good!

On the Malignant Nature of Narcissism

By Stephen A. Diamond Ph.D. on August 07, 2016 in Evil Deeds
Should presidential candidates be required to undergo a psychological evaluation?

A Sort of Revelation

Are the haphazard workings of ‘Chance’, or the purposeful and controlling ‘forces’ of some cosmic ‘Design Intelligence at work in Nature?
John Everett Millais' The Knight Errant of 1870, Wikimedia

Enough With the Trauma Reductionism!

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on August 03, 2016 in Standard Deviations
Psychology as a field has veered too far towards a social constructionist lens, placing too much emphasis on the effects of trauma, especially when it comes to sexuality.

Getting Back to the Source

Be a Chef, not a consumer! Learn to source your food.

Protecting Yourself From Digital Predators

Not all people you digitally communicate with are predators, but all predators use the same communication skills to develop a relationship with you as do sincere people.

Kids’ Sports as a Window Into Human Nature

The dark side of kids’ sports is as dark as human nature gets. Evolutionary psychology can explain why.

Pokémon Go and the Failure of Urban Design

By Colin Ellard Ph.D. on July 31, 2016 in Mind Wandering
Perhaps the popularity of Pokémon Go signals our thirst for interesting urban design.

Unsafe Refuge

The Centers for Disease Control recently reported on the case of a family poisoned in their home after a botched Florida fumigation. It would be reassuring to view this as a fluke

Look Up: The Surprising Joy of Raising Your Gaze

By Colin Ellard Ph.D. on July 29, 2016 in Mind Wandering
Next time you need a lift, try looking upwards.

Do You Truly Love Animals?

Do you know how to show your love for animals truly? This article helps illustrate some surprising insights!