What Is Emotional Intelligence?

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include 3 skills:

1. Emotional awareness, including the ability to identify your own emotions and those of others;

2. The ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problems solving;

3. The ability to manage emotions, including the ability to regulate your own emotions, and the ability to cheer up or calm down another person.

Recent Posts on Emotional Intelligence

Love And Manipulation

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on October 08, 2015 Ambigamy
Understanding how affirmations work will help hone your ability to discriminate between genuine and manipulative flattery.

No Longer at the Mercy of Our Moods

By Tom Wootton on October 08, 2015 Bipolar Advantage
As a culture, we are learning to separate thought from action and stimulus from response. This makes it less likely, less acceptable, and less necessary that any of us be at "the mercy of our moods."

7 Surprising Ways Your Emotions Can Get the Best of You

Recognizing how your emotions influence the way you think and behave can prevent you from making these mistakes.

5 Factors That Make You Feel Shame

The healthiest way to cope is to own up to shame and allow it to dissipate with time.

We Want to Accept Our Feelings, But How Do We Do It?

Focusing was developed through research into psychotherapy effectiveness. Eugene Gendlin found that those clients who were attending to their bodily felt experience in a caring, gentle way were making the most progress in psychotherapy. This article describes Focusing as a path of befriending our experience just as it is.

The Age of Decentralized, Distributed Knowledge

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on October 02, 2015 Jacob's Staff
For centuries, the flow of information has followed the structure of organizations. This is no longer true. What changes have resulted from the explosion in connectivity and information-sharing? How are organizations and leadership struggling to cope? How will our lives be affected? What can we learn from the resistance to innovation/change?

Do Social Odors Build Cities?

By Gayil Nalls Ph.D. on October 02, 2015 Sensoria
Is your smell communicating everything about you, from your state of mind to the foods and drugs you take? Learn how the invisible sense of smell influences every aspects of your daily life.

How Gratitude Builds (and Busts) Relationships

It was the email equivalent of the middle finger. I recently referred a friend of mine to a business coach colleague of mine, and days later I received a thank you, not from him, but from his assistant. Part of the reason why this encounter rubbed me the wrong way is because I am a gratitude junkie.


Happiness can be a "fool's errand," but gratitude and contentment are worthy and achievable pursuits.

Living Life While Facing Death

By Nancy Berns Ph.D. on October 01, 2015 Freedom to Grieve
Daniel said his wife wanted to capture life and keep living even as she faced cancer. How can she still have fun even when telling her son she was dying?

Trumpism: Daily Examples of a Stunning Lack of Compassion

Is one-upmanship, or Trumpism, becoming more prevalent than empathic or compassionate responses in our day-to-day lives?

Emotional Capital

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on September 30, 2015 Hot Thought
Emotional capital is the set of resources that enable people to use emotions effectively in their lives. It includes self-esteem, self-regulation, emotional energy, attachment, resilience, agreeableness, and optimism.

Relationship Ambivalence: Should You Stay or Leave?

By Deborah L. Davis Ph.D. on September 29, 2015 Laugh, Cry, Live
A whirlwind romance starts out with such promise but has descended into a painful struggle. Should you stay or should you leave? Will it be worth the effort or should you run for cover? Paralyzed with uncertainty, you’re stuck in “relationship ambivalence”. The cure? Get out of your head and tune into your body. Your gut is your “second brain,” whose wisdom points the way.

How Aquaman Rules The Shark Tank

Some skills that will prevent you from sinking.

Homo Sapiens 2.0

By Eric Dietrich Ph.D. on September 28, 2015 Excellent Beauty
Humans' religious proclivities help make human existence into a mass extinction event. The best way to solve this problem is to build the better angels of our nature — our machine replacements — and then usher in our own extinction, leaving Earth in better hands.

The Good and Bad of Emotion Regulation Strategies

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on September 28, 2015 Between You and Me
Our emotional experiences weave the tale of our lives. We remember when we felt joy, gratitude, anger, fear, not that time when we felt oh-so-neutral. But sometimes we have to hold back our emotions. People use different strategies when they try to deal with their emotions, and these different strategies impact their feelings, well-being and even their close relationships.

Can You Say No To Requests?

People-pleasing has its up-sides. Generosity tends to uplift the giver as well as the receiver. Yet for the times when you really do not want to do something that someone has requested of you, here's a gracious way to say a clear no.

5 Fears Mentally Strong People Face Head-On

Don't let fear prevent you from reaching your goals.

Is Your Learning Style Paranoid?

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on September 20, 2015 A Swim in Denial
We learn—and grow—by engaging with anomalies: new things that don't fit our familiar categories. It's a gut process, not just a philosophical choice. Anxiety can make us paranoid about what's new and strange. Knowing that can spur fascination and help us to adapt.

Spreading Coherence and Emotion

By Art Markman Ph.D. on September 16, 2015 Ulterior Motives
Going back to the 1950s, social and cognitive psychologists noticed that people’s beliefs tend to become more coherent over time. For example, a couple buying a house might initially notice both the positive and negative elements of that house. If they decide they are not going to buy that house, they may start to focus on the negatives rather than the positives.

Playing Like Grown-Ups

By Bernard L. De Koven on September 16, 2015 On Having Fun
We can release the inner-adult. We can set it free to weave its majestically playful path into the fabric of the daily game.

The 7 Biggest Myths About Mentally Strong People

Believing these misconceptions about mentally strong people could hold you back from building the strength you need to reach your greatest potential.

You're Not Yourself When You're Angry. This Is Who You Are.

By Garth Sundem on September 15, 2015 Brain Candy
When you’re angry, an argument becomes about the person and not the situation.

13 Things Mentally Strong Dogs Don't Do—Learn From Them

Does your dog give up easily? Is your dog a loser... or is he or she mentally strong?

5 Ways Your Pursuit of Happiness Can Backfire

Your pursuit of happiness may not have a happy ending if you're making these mistakes along the way.

Parenting Through Post-It Notes

When did it become acceptable to parent through post-it notes? Worthwhile communication almost always requires a conversation. It is phrased respectfully, and it’s helpful and kind. It tells the listener how I feel and what I want-to-happen, or, what I don’t-want-to-have-happen. It explains “why.”

Why Play?

By Bernard L. De Koven on September 10, 2015 On Having Fun
"Playfulness is, in part, an openness to being a fool, which is a combination of not worrying about competence, not being self-important, not taking norms as sacred and finding ambiguity and double edges a source of wisdom and delight."

Living Closer to the Bone (Part 7)

By Michael Jawer on September 10, 2015 Feeling Too Much
Sentient creatures share a profound connectedness, with one another and with nature. The concept of soul can be understood in context of this innately felt connection with creation.

'Inside-Out' Goes Deep Inside

Pixar's psychologically insightful summer blockbuster, 'Inside Out,' makes challenging ideas about the importance of sadness and the multiplicity of self seem like common sense.

Lessons Learned in Recovery

By Fran Simone Ph.D. on September 08, 2015 A Family Affair
Lesson learned by loved ones to help them deal with the challenges they face with family members with substance abuse issues.