What Is Emotional Intelligence?

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include 3 skills:

1. Emotional awareness, including the ability to identify your own emotions and those of others;

2. The ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problems solving;

3. The ability to manage emotions, including the ability to regulate your own emotions, and the ability to cheer up or calm down another person.

Recent Posts on Emotional Intelligence

Grow a Key Inner Strength

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Your Wise Brain
Use these four questions help grow inner strengths. 1) What's the issue? 2) What psychological resource - inner strength - if it were more present in your mind, would really help with this issue? 3) How could you have experiences of this inner strength? 4) How could you help this experience of the inner strength really sink in to you?

Confusing How and Why Is Prolonging The Suffering in Bipolar

By Tom Wootton on February 23, 2015 in Bipolar Advantage
If you want to end all suffering you need to understand the difference between why and how. The reason so many people are still suffering is because this difference has not been made clear enough.

What’s Behind Women’s Intuition?

By Audrey Nelson Ph.D. on February 22, 2015 in He Speaks, She Speaks
The ability to decode nonverbal cues is ultimately valuable and essential for effective communication. So women must ask themselves, how can we use these skills to enhance our effectiveness instead of letting them divert us? Women must not focus on others for a definition of what is “normal” or acceptable behavior; they must define it for themselves.

8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victimhood, and victory versus defeat. Here are eight negative attitudes of chronically unhappy people...

Emotions As a Second Language - Or Should They Be Our First?

Emotional literacy is being able to feel and identify one’s feeling states. This fluency enhances emotional self-regulation, lessens over-reactivity to negative emotions such as anger, and is the basis of interpersonal emotional modulation.

5 Fixes for When Good Conversations Go Bad

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on February 19, 2015 in Creating in Flow
My soon-to-be-ex-husband said in a therapy session, “I’m not blaming. I’m just explaining what she did wrong.” If only we’d both had copies of the new book Blamestorming with its wealth of help for conversations going wrong.

21 Ways to Get Closer to Your Child Today

Research shows that we need at least five positive interactions to each negative interaction to maintain a healthy, happy relationship that can weather the normal conflicts and upsets of daily life. This is true for our relationships with our children as well.

Can Dogs Recognize Emotions Just by Looking at a Human Face?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 17, 2015 in Canine Corner
New data shows that dogs need only a glimpse of your mouth or your eyes to determine whether you are happy or angry.

Stop Judging and Become a Better Communicator

By Aldo Civico Ph.D. on February 16, 2015 in Turning Point
The major barrier to mutual interpersonal communication is our very natural tendency to judge and to evaluate, wrote the great psychologist Carl Roger. I explain the four most common forms of judgement and evaluation we use that undermine the quality of our interpersonal relations. Becoming aware of how we judge can help us to become more effective communicators.

5 Things You Need to Know About Body Language

If you want to become a “master” of nonverbal communication, there are some things you need to know.

How to Become the Most Attractive Job Candidate

By Erica Dhawan on February 16, 2015 in Accelerated Connectedness
We often think that because we have a great academic record or went to the right schools, we’ll be great at any job and will impress any potential boss. But, in today’s world, standing out takes much more than just relying on a good resume. The key is knowing your strengths and figuring out how they will fit into different work environments.

5 Tips about Writing and Health

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on February 16, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
Research on writing finds evidence of its positive influence on emotional and physical health.

How to Improve Your Relationship Satisfaction

By Kristine Anthis Ph.D. on February 13, 2015 in Who Am I?
What is the Secret to Relationship Satisfaction?

Don't Say That

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on February 10, 2015 in Head of the Class
Students sometimes say the darnedest things—can we help them to think a bit before blurting?

Why You Might Find It Harder to Make New Friends

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on February 09, 2015 in Good Thinking
Every seven years we lose about half of our close network of friends and replace them with others. Here's how it's done.

Are You Raising a Couch Potato?

Do you ever wonder why some kids become unmotivated—why they would rather doze off in front of the TV instead of working toward a personal goal? Learn how initiative is developed and fostered through specific types of experiences—most of which happen outside of school!

Why Our Emotions Are More Rational Than We Think

By Eyal Winter on February 09, 2015 in Feeling Smart
Emotions, rationality, and behavior.

Are You Mentally Strong or Just Acting Tough?

There are seven key differences that separate people who are mentally strong from those who are simply acting tough.

Understanding PTSD, TBI, Suicide and Student Veteran Success

Research shows that the transition from the intensity of military life to a more independent civilian life can be overwhelming. Recognizing and understanding special symptoms supports the important objective of increasing the success of many veteran students on campus. It is important to share this information about the needs of student veterans.

How to succeed at work

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on February 07, 2015 in A Sideways View
How can you be really savvy at work? What advice would you give to someone just starting a job

10 Steps to Developing Your Leadership

For over 100 years, social scientists have studied leadership and what makes leaders effective. Here are the ten steps to developing your core leadership competencies.

Forget Co-Parenting with a Narcissist, and Do This Instead

By Linda Esposito LCSW on February 06, 2015 in From Anxiety to Zen
While co-parenting with a narcissist is nearly impossible, these strategies can help you and your child(ren) thrive when drama and emotional intensity threaten to derail your mental health.

How to Tell Your Boss How You Feel

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on February 04, 2015 in Wander Woman
Sometimes you need to teach your boss how to best manage you—what motivates you and demotivates you—so you can perform at your best. Here is a technique you can use with tips for making this uncomfortable conversation work in your favor.

Social-Emotional Teaching via Email

By APA Division 15 on February 02, 2015 in PsychEd
Increasingly, teachers are communicating with their student electronically—and this is an often overlooked medium for sharing social-emotional information and modelling how successful professionals communicate. Emotionally supportive e-mails may improve teacher-student relationships, which ultimately promote academic achievement.

What Motivates People to Make Healthier Lifestyle Choices?

By Christopher Bergland on January 30, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
A Cornell University study released yesterday offers new insights that can help you create a personalized inner-dialogue and messaging strategy that will motivate you to make healthier lifestyle choices every day.

Seeking Comfort the Impossible Way

Seeking comfort from eating, drinking, compulsive habits, contacting an ex, or from social media sites may hamper rather than help your self-esteem.

Part II: “Fix Society. Please!”

By Leon Pomeroy Ph.D. on January 28, 2015 in Beyond Good and Evil
Canaries in the Mine of Civilization

6 Ways to Get More Comfortable With Others, and Yourself

Social skills are a vital tool to promote success in life. You may think that the socially adept among us are born, not bred. These 7 simple tips can help you gain the skills you need to handle any situation with charm and grace.

Leader's Resolution: This Year, Roll Up Your Sleeves & Help

By Sigal Barsade Ph.D. on January 15, 2015 in The Science of Work
“Leading by doing” builds a stronger organization.

What Is Body Language?

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on January 10, 2015 in A Sideways View
Most people are fascinated about body language: how, how much, when, where, and why we communicate not be spoken but unspoken language. The topic has been investigated for more than 100 years by scientists from many different backgrounds. Yet, there remains many unsubstantiated claims by self-appointed experts. What do we know, and not know, about nonverbal communication?