What Is Emotional Intelligence?

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include three skills: emotional awareness; the ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problem solving; and the ability to manage emotions, which includes regulating your own emotions and cheering up or calming down other people.

Recent posts on Emotional Intelligence

Facts, Truths, Beliefs, Opinions, and "Alternative Facts"

By Clifford N Lazarus Ph.D. on March 25, 2017 in Think Well
In this time of "alternative facts," it's helpful to consider the difference among actual facts, truths, beliefs, preferences and opinions.

Is a Bird in the Hand Worth Two in the Bush?

By Neel Burton M.D. on March 24, 2017 in Hide and Seek
A bird in the hand is worth more than two in the bush, if you don't kill it.

Am I Normal?

Do we ask too much of our lives? The power of defining emotional wellness with wisdom.

Why Grit Isn’t Everything

Is grit the key ingredient for your success? What should you cultivate in addition to grit?
Rowan Heuvel/Stocksnap.io

Healing the Most Important Relationship In Your Life

If you had a choice, what would you rather be feeling right now?

5 Exercises That Train Your Brain for Happiness and Success

A strong mind will take you far in life. Here's how to exercise your brain.

Can Somebody Please Teach President Trump Civility?

Previously immune from the consequences of his own instincts, President Trump doesn't act like an adult.

Rachel Maddow Needs to Better Understand Her Audience

If reporters and journalists are to relate effectively to their target audience, they must be empathic, always attempting to perceive the world through the eyes of their viewers.

5 Ways Predators Prey on Politeness

Think you can spot a predator while traveling? Here are 5 tips to make sure you can. Take these precautions to ensure that your Spring Break travel is both satisfying and safe.

Can a Country Lacking Empathy Toward Others Be Great?

Caring for others and a commitment to fairness are essential to a healthy, civil, and just society.

Patient in Chief

By Craig Malkin Ph.D. on March 16, 2017 in Romance Redux
Diagnosing Donald Trump from afar comes with a cost—including further dividing the country. Understand the debate and the one way we might heal as a nation.
Synergee/iStock

Where Are the Trustworthy Leaders?

By Tara Well Ph.D. on March 16, 2017 in The Clarity
Trustworthy leaders aren’t always easy to spot. Research reveals some not so obvious qualities to look for.

Forecasting Happiness

How do we know what will make us happy? Psychologist Daniel Gilbert’s insights on happiness.

What's the Difference Between Guilt and Shame?

By Neel Burton M.D. on March 16, 2017 in Hide and Seek
Shame and guilt often go hand in hand, which is why they are readily confused.

Sexual Harassment Is in the Eye of the Beholder

Sexual Harassment: Do you know it when you see it? Many people don´t--including the perpetrators.
Goldenarts/Shutterstock

Technology's Battle for IQ, EQ, or Something Very Different

By John Nosta on March 14, 2017 in The Digital Self
Enough with IQ and EQ. Technology is demanding its own score.

How to Have Difficult Conversations

By Dan Mager MSW on March 13, 2017 in Some Assembly Required
Most everyone dreads the difficult conversation. However, with planning and preparation you can maximize the chances that your conversation will serve its intended purpose.

Admissions (and Job) Interviews in Clinical Programs

The selection process is a window into the program’s vision of what psychology is.

Want to be a Great Listener? Do this 1 Thing.

By Andy Molinsky Ph.D. on March 12, 2017 in Adaptation
Want to be a Great Listener? Do this 1 Thing.

Can Young Children Tell Real Smiles From Fake Smiles?

Recent research suggests that young children can distinguish real from fake smiles. Real smiles indicate honesty and cooperation.

Why (Most) Polyamorous People Are Not Out to Steal Your Wife

There are three main reasons polyamorous people are not trying to steal monogamous partners away from their spouses -- consent, skills, and orientation.

In Defense of Empathy

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on March 10, 2017 in Hot Thought
A new book argues that empathy is not only overrated but actually harmful to morality. But it is often helpful in guiding ethical judgment and motivating appropriate actions.

Photography Documenting Mental Illness Draws Criticism

Through her project, feelings of pain and hurt that Melissa held toward her mother were gone, and she found herself feeling greater empathy, acknowledging her mother's illness.

What’s the Matter with Empathy?

By Sara Konrath Ph.D. on March 07, 2017 in The Empathy Gap
At a time when “empathy” is more controversial than ever, a researcher explains what it is, what it isn’t, and when it fosters kindness and compassion.

How Children Learn Right from Wrong

When children feel close to their parents, they want to "follow" them. Going against their parents would be going against the most important people in their lives.

Does Your Body Language Give You Away?

It’s widely known that your body language provides a window into your thoughts. Control that language, with guidance from this new research, to improve your relationships.

Unrealistic Expectations Impede Happiness and Empathy

Having unrealistic expectations is a major source of unhappiness and it's very challenging to be grateful for disappointments.
Used by permission. www.atacrossroads.net

Wounded by Sarcasm

By Steve Albrecht DBA on March 05, 2017 in The Act of Violence
Sarcasm is often mean words in disguise.
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Marital Hygiene in Three Easy Steps

Why is my partner getting upset with me? How to clean the shmutz out of your marital communication.

6 Surprising Facts About Happiness

Is positive psychology just the confirmation of the obvious? No it isn't! Here are six research findings about happiness that will surprise you.