What Is Emotional Intelligence?

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include 3 skills:

1. Emotional awareness, including the ability to identify your own emotions and those of others;

2. The ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problems solving;

3. The ability to manage emotions, including the ability to regulate your own emotions, and the ability to cheer up or calm down another person.

Recent Posts on Emotional Intelligence

Why Patience is Power

By Neel Burton M.D. on May 23, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Life is too short to wait, but it is not too short for patience.

A Crash Course on Gender Differences Session 3

By Eyal Winter on May 23, 2015 in Feeling Smart
(1) expression of love (2) sex without commitment (3) health concerns.

Behaviours for Winners

Winning behaviours to help you get what you want and want what you get.

Balancing a Japanese and Irish Heritage

I have learned to balance my parents' lessons in living.

People Who Say “I Hate Game Playing” Play Them

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on May 19, 2015 in Ambigamy
Hate game playing? Hate it enough to wonder what's really behind it? If so read on.

Mentoring: The Missing Link for Highly Sensitive Children

Ever wonder if your sensitive child needs a mentor?

Reading Faces

By David Ludden Ph.D. on May 18, 2015 in Talking Apes
The language you speak can influence the way you perceive the emotional expressions of other people.

Live Like You Were Dying

A sign on the refrigerator of my South African hostess reads “Find life experiences and swallow them whole. Travel. Meet many people. Go down some dead ends and explore dark alleys. Try everything. Exhaust yourself in the glorious pursuit of life…” -Lawrence K. Fish

The Critical Difference Between Explanations and Excuses

Explanations help you learn from your mistakes. Excuses will damage your relationships and sabotage your chances of success.

The Case for Margins in a Student’s Life

By Tim Elmore on May 14, 2015 in Artificial Maturity
I’ve noticed a subtle pattern in college and high school students. I wonder if you’ve seen it too. Over the past year, I’ve marveled at what kids find humorous.

We Have It All Wrong About Lonely People

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 12, 2015 in Living Single
A set of just-published studies shows that lonely people have social skills that are just as good, or even better, than those of non-lonely people. But certain social situations make lonely people anxious, and that anxiety undermines the skills that are there for them when they are not worried.

The Psychology of Feedback vs. Praise

By Gregory Ciotti on May 10, 2015 in Habits, Not Hacks
Providing the right kind of feedback means everything.

What is a 'Clean' Breakup? (And How to Achieve One)

Letting go can be so painful that it's easier to create drama and/or necessitate a fight rather than part ways on amicable terms.

9 Ways to Get Past Self-Pity

Mentally strong people refuse to feel sorry for themselves. Instead, they use life's inevitable hardships to grow stronger and become better.

Emotional Ideologies

By Eyal Winter on May 08, 2015 in Feeling Smart
We vote out of passion and not out of reasoning

The Anti-Psychiatry Movement

The 1960s and 1970s saw the growth of the Anti-Psychiatry movement. What was that all about? Where do we stand on some of these issues today?

Behaviour for Failures

Top behaviours that guarantee misery for yourself and others

The Best Way To Handle Children’s Nightmares

An automatic response for many parents after their child has a nightmare is, “It’s not real, so you don’t need to feel scared.” The problem is, while the bad dream isn’t real, the emotions that the child is experiencing are intensely real and can’t be ignored.

Mentally Strong People Don’t Feel Sorry for Themselves

Every minute you spend hosting your own pity party is 60 seconds you delay working on a solution.

Are We Losing the Ability to Read Each Other's Emotions?

Research shows how our digital world may be taking a toll on our emotional intelligence.

Curious Criticism? Or do you get defensive?

Don't lose opportunities to grow.

Why Your Old Friends Are Vital to Your Future

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in The Squeaky Wheel
Can we predict who might be at risk for becoming lonely later in life?

Smart Leaders Know They Need to Put Their Phones Away

By Craig Dowden Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in The Leader's Code
How smartphones can undermine the most important relationships of our lives.

The Real Reason Some Women Put Themselves Down

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Good Thinking
Women usually respond to compliments by putting themselves down. Research shows that the reason for this is not low self-esteem or self-hatred. Instead, it is something far more subtle, strategic...and powerful.

3 Reasons You Need Mental Strength to Thrive

Building mental strength will help you reach your greatest potential, despite whatever challenges you face.

How Well Do You Understand Your Emotions?

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on April 24, 2015 in The Squeaky Wheel
How tuned in are you to your emotions?

The Most Important Thing To Know During Bipolar Episodes

By Tom Wootton on April 23, 2015 in Bipolar Advantage
There is one specialized type of knowledge that trumps all of the others during states of mania and depression, knowing how to function while in the state. While all the other types of knowledge are interesting, knowing how to function can literally be the difference between life and death.

Revisiting “Be Here Now”

Being here now is a term that is often misunderstood. Rather that use spiritual practice to avoid feelings, what would it mean to embrace our feelings?

You Can't Fix Everything

I’m much more at peace since I stopped trying to fix everyone’s life, including my own. It’s making it easier to take those unfixable moments in stride and to appreciate happiness and joy when they happen to come my way.