What Is Emotion Regulation?

We all experience moments when our emotions control our actions. When this happens, we often regret the things we say or do and wish we had been able to keep our emotions in check. There are techniques—like meditation—that can allow you to do just that, along with various other benefits, like mood improvement and increased compassion and empathy.

Recent posts on Emotion Regulation

Emotionally Upset? 20 Ways to Defeat Negative Feelings

When your psychological chain gets yanked, it’s all too easy to get overwhelmed by powerful feelings. But losing control of your emotions is never a good thing.

Can Sleep Loss Make Us More Violent?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on October 26, 2016 in Media Spotlight
A new review article written in the journal Psychology of Violence suggests that sleep problems plays a far greater role in aggression that anyone has ever suspected.

Self-Centeredness May Sabotage Self-Control, Study Finds

By Christopher Bergland on October 25, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study reports that the same brain region used to put yourself in someone else's shoes and practice theory of mind also improves self-control by overcoming self-centeredness.

When Anxiety Means Suffering, Can Therapy Really Help?

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on October 23, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Some therapists intuitively help clients develop right brain self-regulation. Therapists who are not relationally intuitive apply "paint-by-numbers" therapy learned in grad school.

Election Stress Disorder

By Stan Tatkin Psy.D. on October 22, 2016 in The Puzzle of Love
Americans are suffering emotionally due to the caustic nature of the election, and our brains offer both the explanation and the solution.

A Mindfulness-Based Approach to Healing From Loss

By Dan Mager MSW on October 17, 2016 in Some Assembly Required
Ironically, allowing oneself to feel the pain of loss takes considerably less energy than running from or trying to suppress it.

Personality and the Brain, Part 1

One evening on October 11, 2009, life took a dramatic turn for 41-year-old Leigh Erceg.

Your Amygdala May House Both Positive and Negative Memories

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Positive and negative memories may be housed in specific regions of the amygdala, according to a new mice study. These findings offer many clues for overcoming negativity and fear.

Claustrophobia: Cause and Cure

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on October 16, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
On top of a building, the most direct escape is to jump, a thought that can trigger panic and make stairs and elevators seem impossible to navigate. The answer: alarm attenuation

Freedom vs. Security in Z Nation's Zombie Apocalypse

Z Nation, Syfy's road trip adventure set in a zombie apocalypse, turns darker and explores Erich Fromm's "basic human dilemma," freedom vs. security. Is freedom worth the fear?

5 Ways to Deal With Someone Who Never Stops Bragging

Nobody likes a bragger, but what is the best way to stop one? Here are some creative ways to change what you can.

How to Stop Violence in America

There is a solution to stop the violence in America. A solution that is far more central than controlling religious radicalization and gun access. It's all about fear.
Ben Harding/iStock

A New Look at the Role of Apps in Distracted Teen Driving

New research reveals app usage is a major risk for distracted driving. The results provide a useful guide for productive conversations between teens and parents.

The Gender Gap in the Presidential Race

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on October 06, 2016 in Intentional Insights
How emotional intelligence and gender norms for emotional expression might impact the presidential race

It’s Okay to Be an Angry Young Woman

By Guest Blogger on October 06, 2016 in The Guest Room
Teenage girls in fiction tend to be stubborn, moody, or brooding, but rarely are they seething with anger. Why not?

Are You Mentally Strong?

Answering these 27 questions will help you gain insight into how mentally strong you really are.

Fast Food Industry Demands ‘Emotional Labour’ from Employees

Cheerful presence can be essential to profitability in the fast-food industry. But emotional labour may be doing more harm than good to employee emotional and mental wellbeing.

Rethinking Prejudice

Prejudice is a “resource system,” an arsenal of weaponry–cultural, social, and personal–that remains in storage most of the time but can be taken out and used strategically.

When Anxious, Our Most Basic Strategy Is to Run

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on October 03, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Our most basic way of dealing with our fears and anxieties is to run away from them. But, if we always run away, we severely limit our life and our relationships.

How to Avoid Attending Someone Else's Pity Party

Refusing to participate could be the kindest, most compassionate thing you could do.

Energy Bites for Teachers

By Joseph Cardillo Ph.D. on September 29, 2016 in Attention Training
Often times the last person teachers think about is themselves.

Constructive Anger

By Paul Ekman Ph.D. on September 29, 2016 in Face It!
Do you use anger constructively? The Dalai Lama and Paul Ekman weigh in.

How An Art Break Helps Kids Learn

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in Home Base
Integrating play and creativity into the school day may help children learn. Here's an innovative school counseling program that did just that.

How to Keep Calm, Carry On, and Still Get Your Way

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on September 26, 2016 in The Dolphin Divide
Diffusing negative energy before it goes rodeo. How behavioral psychology can help you get what you want even when tempers begin to flare.

If You Want to Become More Mindful, Check Your Watch

By Karl Albrecht Ph.D. on September 24, 2016 in BrainSnacks
if the “monkey mind,” as the Eastern practitioners call it, has a mind of its own, how does one become more “mindful?” How can your mind stay focused, when it loves to wander?

Our Anger Crisis: Self-Respect and Getting Angry

By Michael Cholbi Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in Ethics in Question
Martha Nussbaum thinks we don't need anger in order to have self-respect. But isn't the anger-free person weak?

What Does It Take to Be Happy?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 21, 2016 in Talking Apes
For ages, philosophers have debated the meaning of happiness. Now, the science of happiness tells us how to achieve it.

Guilt and Shame

Guilt and shame are two rather different negative emotions which are often confused. In both cases, people feel bad about themselves—but that is where the similarity ends.

Cornerstone of Eating Disorder Recovery

Emotions are inescapable. Negative emotions are powerful. Attempts to rid them are what eating disorders thrive on. It is often easier to have an eating disorder than to feel bad