Insights on Education

From language acquisition to problem solving to social skills, questions of how we learn are central to understanding human development. Formal education has its share of critics—can psychology lead the way to true reform?

Recent posts on Education

The Perfectionist Mistake about the Meaning of Life: Part 1

Some see life as meaningless because their obsession to achieve only the excellent blinds them to the great value of the good

When Learning a Foreign Language

By Marianna Pogosyan Ph.D. on August 18, 2017 in Between Cultures
The roads that lead to foreign language mastery are as fascinating as the languages themselves. Here are four tips to help you along the way.
Ibiza landscape. Pxhere. Public domain.

Did You Have a Productive Summer?

By Laura Otis Ph.D. on August 17, 2017 in Rethinking Thought
Why do we feel that we have to produce something, like an egg squeezed from a chicken, to justify three months of life?

Young Men and the Empathy Gap

By Philip Zimbardo Ph.D. on August 15, 2017 in Hero
We have an empathy gap when it comes to having compassion for the challenges boys and young men face, and we're going to lose a whole generation if we don't pay attention.

Why Our Students Can’t Write

Here's part of the solution to a big problem in American education.

Is There a "Superior” Sex?

Whether we are talking about academic, emotional, or social success, young males these days are struggling. Let’s acknowledge and address this problem.

Can Science Provide Insight into the Arts?

By Robert H. Woody Ph.D. on August 15, 2017 in Live... In Concert
Research has shown that the diehard talent myth is not only useless in explaining anything but also harmful to people who might otherwise enjoy a more musically enriching life.
Nancy F. Knapp

It's Poverty, Stupid!

Billions spent to raise U.S. reading scores have had little, if any, effect. Is the money misspent? Maybe, but there is another major factor holding us back.

Do You Have Any Idea What Causes a Solar Eclipse?

By Andrew Shtulman Ph.D. on August 14, 2017 in Inconceivable
The U.S. is preparing for a solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, an event that is not only rare but also counterintuitive.

Age and Critical Thinking

Though mature students think they’re pretty good at CT, often they are not.

Beyond Charlottesville

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on August 14, 2017 in Head of the Class
The events in Charlottesville, Virginia, were disturbing. Enclosed are some anti-Hate resources for teachers and interested others to use in their classrooms in the coming weeks.

The Longest Ride Home

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on August 13, 2017 in Social Lights
12 ways parents can cope with college move in

How Over-Learning can Solidify a Skill

Can practicing a skill beyond the point of mastery solidify it in memory? Study suggests it can, and that neural inhibition might prevent interference by another task.

Why Are We Doing This, Sir? What's The Point?

By Nick Luxmoore on August 12, 2017 in Young People Up Close
How to make sense of the adult world without having the identity of a traditional profession? How to develop a sense of personal agency in a world where the rules keep changing?

Hey Prof, The Xbox Goes Over There!

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on August 12, 2017 in Social Lights
What might surprise you during move in weekend

Making Your Education Career-Ready

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 11, 2017 in How To Do Life
Wringing maximum benefit from your undergraduate or graduate experience.

Seven Tips for College and Graduate Students

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 11, 2017 in How To Do Life
Common-sense ideas that, alas, are too-often neglected.

Debunking Neuromyths: Eight Common Brain Myths Set Straight

By Christopher Bergland on August 10, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study puts brain myths in the spotlight. True or false: "Some people are left-brained and some of us are right-brained." Many believe this myth is true. It's not.

Preserving Michigan’s No-Fault Insurance System

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on August 10, 2017 in The New Normal
Prevention is cheaper than the cure.

The Case for Not Giving Grades

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 10, 2017 in How To Do Life
Furthering intrinsic motivation while reducing undue student stress.
Coalition Famille LGBT, used with permission

Building Classroom Community

Tips for educators getting ready for a new school year.

Essential Parenting Tasks for a Healthy College Transition

The transition to campus and adulthood brings high stress for students. Here are the steps you should take as a parent to support them through this transition.
Garry Knight/Flickr

Can Nudging Help Students who are Homeless and Hungry?

By Ross E O'Hara, Ph.D. on August 07, 2017 in Nudging Ahead
An increasing number of college students attend classes despite lacking food, shelter, or both. Can behavioral science provide some solutions?

Turning the Page on ADHD

Naturally, change is hard for all kids, and can be harder for those with ADHD. A new school year is the perfect time to pause, reconsider, and set up new routines.

What Graduate Students Need to Know (and What Nobody Says)

The perfect is the enemy of the good. You can rewrite, you can revise, you can refine, but the first thing you have to do is write.
Public Domain Pictures

ABCs or Ps and Qs?

With the new school year quickly approaching, you may be practicing the ABCs and how to count to 20 with your almost-kindergartener, but is this really the key to success?

Teaching General Psychology with a Larger Purpose

By Michael D. Matthews Ph.D. on August 05, 2017 in Head Strong
At the U.S. Military Academy (West Point), general psychology is required for all cadets, and is essential in their development as leaders.

Why Aren’t We Teaching Our Students How to be Happy?

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on August 05, 2017 in The First Impression
How can the empirical literature on happiness be used in our classrooms to help our students build skills to increase their own well-being?

Seeing the Sky as a Copernican

We are not naturally inclined to perceive the world in conformity with even our most familiar and well-learned scientific commitments.

Mental Down Time Affects Learning

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 04, 2017 in Memory Medic
"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," might be re-framed, "all work and no rest makes Jack a poor learner."