Insights on Education

From language acquisition to problem solving to social skills, questions of how we learn are central to understanding human development. Formal education has its share of critics—can psychology lead the way to true reform?

Recent posts on Education

White House Targets Transgender Students: Bad For Us All

By Mark O'Connell L.C.S.W.- R. on February 24, 2017 in Quite Queerly
No matter what your politics are, it is in the best interest of our collective mental health to protect all of our students, not just some of them.

Kenneth Arrow

By Eyal Winter Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Feeling Smart
From the Impossibility Theorem to Ken's WWII story.

Obstacles to Practicing Professional Ethics in Real Life

Why might well-educated professionals take ethical missteps?
"drinking water"/darwin Bell/CC BY 2.0

Finding the "Why" of a Special-Needs Child's Behavior

By Barb Cohen on February 23, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
Behavior is a form of communication, and more often than not, especially in young children, it is not communicating a desire to be non-compliant or troublesome.

What Trump’s Actions Really Mean for Transgender Students

Five things to know and do in response to Trump's revocation of supportive resources for transgender youth.

Learning to Manage Emotions Boosts Children's Well-being

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Talking About Trauma
Schools lay the groundwork for cognitive development, especially in academic areas. But what about emotional development?
Svitlana-ua/Shutterstock

To Sleep, Perhaps to Learn

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Memory Medic
Odds are the kids in your life are not getting enough sleep. Scientists now know that sleep is needed for "smart forgetting."

The Charter vs. Public School Fight

By The Research Lab on February 21, 2017 in The Fundamentals
We all lose when we pit one against the other. By Cynthia Franklin, Ph.D.

Preschool, Nanny, Parental Care, Daycare? What’s Best?

For the most part, when parents are warm, nurturing, responsive, and engaged, their children thrive. Family life is what matters most to a young child’s development.
K. Ramsland

Crime, Gore and So Much More

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on February 19, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
The Museum of Death in New Orleans offers exhibits that educate.

America's Spelling Is a National Disaster

Spelling errors tweeted within the Trump administration raise the issue of why spelling matters. Spelling needs to be taught!

All Problems Are Betrayals

By Nick Luxmoore on February 17, 2017 in Young People Up Close
For young people, all problems provoke primitive anxieties of betrayal: reminders of an original betrayal they can't consciously remember but can't help feeling strongly about.

Managing Information to Be Remembered

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Memory Medic
What you just learned can interfere with remembering what you are about to learn.

Controlling the Conduct of College Women in the 1960s

By Frank T. McAndrew Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in Out of the Ooze
Rules regulating the freedoms of college women were absolutely draconian in 1962. In hindsight, the unabashed double standards of collegiate social regulations were jaw dropping.

The Best Response to Narcissism in Students

By Tim Elmore on February 15, 2017 in Artificial Maturity
At the core of narcissism is the fantasy that you are better than you really are. But . . . what might be the cause of this misperception?

Think You Know the Story on Black Males? Think Again

By The Research Lab on February 14, 2017 in The Fundamentals
Historical truths that give voice to black males. By Anthony L. Brown, Ph.D.

Rethinking the College Mental Health Crisis

By Kristen Lee Ed.D., LICSW on February 14, 2017 in Reset 24/7
Do bubble wrap and special snowflake myths distract us from the realities today's students face? A biopsychosocial lens can help us find ways to cultivate agility and resilience.

A Conversation About Underage Drinking

It is silly to think that turning 21 makes one a responsible drinker. Knowledge, above all else, is the dividing factor, and education can start at any age.

Social Class

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Head of the Class
Social class is the sociocultural elephant in the room, but we need to talk about it and learn about it to understand the state of our nation.

Pet Loss and the Human-Animal Bond

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Animal Emotions
An interview with the founder of the Pet Loss Education Project, Adam Clark, who specializes in coping with the grief of losing a companion animal.

Decision Making 101

By Atalanta Beaumont on February 10, 2017 in Handy Hints for Humans
Learning how to decide what's good for you.

Motor Skills, Movement, and Math Performance Are Intertwined

By Christopher Bergland on February 10, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There is growing evidence that children who are physically active do better in school. A new study found that kids who move their bodies while learning math get higher test scores.

Help! The Teacher Says My Child Is Misbehaving

By Janet Hicks Ph.D. on February 08, 2017 in Raising Parents
How can I help my child when the teacher says he/she is misbehaving?

What Predicts Success in Psychology Graduate Programs?

By Todd B. Kashdan Ph.D. on February 08, 2017 in Curious?
Each year students acquire hundreds of hours of research experience, present science at conferences and yet never stand a chance to get into graduate school. Because of GRE scores.

How Learning Theory Can Help STEM Educators

By APA Division 15 on February 06, 2017 in PsychEd
Is traditional lecture-style teaching the best technique for large science courses? Student-centered learning techniques provide alternatives to lecturing.

Grad Students and Perfectionism

By Amy Green M.A., C.C.C. on February 06, 2017 in Psy-curious
How getting a C once in awhile (instead of always striving for the A+) can help students overcome perfectionism and procrastination - but may be easier said than done.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Teaching the Early Adolescent About Freedom

Adolescence are concerned with getting freedom to grow -- freedom from from old restraints and freedom for new opportunity. Parents need to speak to both concerns.

Why English Is Such a Difficult Language to Learn

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on February 05, 2017 in Language in the Mind
Why is English such a difficult language to learn for non-native speakers. We explore some of the peculiarities of English, including baffling spelling, making it tough to learn.

How to Change a Person’s Mind

How to cope when the people we love have beliefs we hate.