Symptoms of Depression

Not everyone who is depressed or manic experiences every symptom. Some people experience a few symptoms, some many. Severity of symptoms varies among individuals and also varies over time.

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or empty mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, being "slowed down"
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions
  • Insomnia, early morning awakening or oversleeping
  • Appetite and/or weight loss, or overeating and weight gain
  • Thoughts of death or suicide, suicide attempts
  • Restlessness, irritability
  • Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders and chronic pain

Recent posts on Depression

pexels.com

Quiz: Self Care for the Sensitive

How narcissistically vulnerable are you? Take this quiz and learn how to protect the narcissistically vulnerable parts of yourself.

"13 Reasons Why:" Psychological Costs for Vulnerable Kids

This binge-able series is wildly successful with teens, but they may also find it unexpectedly evocative, disturbing, and misleading.

For Parents: High School Students Facing Year-End Burnout

Is your exhausted, stressed-out high school student crumbling at the end of the school year? These tips will help you provide the practical support your child needs.

A Grieving Gorilla: A Picture That's Worth Entire Courses

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on May 27, 2017 in Animal Emotions
A photo of a sad orphaned gorilla and a comforting human raises numerous questions about what other animals think and feel and the emotions shared in human-animal relationships.

16-Year Study: Surprising Findings about Marriage and Health

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 27, 2017 in Living Single
In a 16-year study, more than 11,000 people were followed as they married and divorced. Here’s what happened to their health, life satisfaction, and depression.

Chris Cornell’s Life and Death: Suicide Is Not Painless

We don’t know the depth of people’s suffering, the silent struggles they daily endure.

5 Things to Remember When You're Embarrassed to Ask for Help

Asking for help is tough. But there are some good reasons why you should do it anyway.
Dora Calott Wang

What's Up with Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar disorder is as malignant as cancer, says Robert Post.
Pixabay

You Are Not Your Circumstances

Start treating yourself like you’d treat a good friend and separating who you are from what happens to you with these 4 steps
istock.com

Suicide Is a Scary Word

Passive thoughts of suicide should alert every therapist to the possibility that darkness is looming.

Jacoby Shaddix Is Marching Right Next to You

"I just feel like I’m drowning in myself."
Unsplash

Six Important Truths about Depression

What not to say to someone with depression.

Two Words That Make Asking for Help a lot Easier

Asking for help is tough. Knowing what to say makes it a little easier.

Measuring Happiness: How Can We Measure It?

Can positive psychology researchers really measure happiness? Here are five ways they try—and some of the surprising and interesting findings that come from measuring happiness.

13 Reasons Why

Have your heard warnings about "13 Reasons Why?" Get the basics about how clinical depression is diagnosed.

Chris Cornell: When Suicide Doesn’t Make Sense

What might have been happening inside the rock star's mind.

Will You Be Less Depressed If You Get Married? Two Studies

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 19, 2017 in Living Single
When single people marry, do they get less depressed? Are married people less depressed than people who are cohabiting or dating or single with no romantic partner?
 123rf.com/Boris Zatserkovnyy

Postpartum Depression: Mothers and Babies Are Still Dying

Scores of pregnant and postpartum women continue to suffer in silence and wonder if letting someone know will make things better or worse.
Steve Collender at Bigstock.com

Mental Illness Splits Families

By Susan Noonan MD on May 18, 2017 in View From the Mist
Does mental illness in one person create anger and resentment in your other family members?

Fell on Black Days: Mourning the Suicide of Chris Cornell

By Joe Pierre M.D. on May 18, 2017 in Psych Unseen
Reflections on suicide, celebrity, and selfishness

Are Therapists Just Rent-a-Friends?

If you had real friends, some people say, you wouldn’t need a therapist. Is psychotherapy really just a substitute for friendship or is there more to it?

Is Depression Apart from Grief or a Part of Grief?

The title above alludes to a really tricky question. And a complicated one, too. For the answer to this two-part inquiry is, well, “Yes” and “Yes.”
Christian Sterk

Hidden Faces

It seems counterintuitive: sadness in the spring as flowers bloom and temperatures rise.

Yoga Lifts Depression & Helps You Flex when Wound Too Tight

Controlling your breath can open the space that allows you to control your mood without any conscious effort on your part.

Tips for Spring Cleaning

Cleaning up the stress mess is vital. Long-term, ongoing stress is bad for your physical and emotional health.

The "Furry Test Tubes" of Obesity Research

Mice are the most common animals now used in obesity research.They have many advantages for scientists who work with them but are far from perfect as a model for human beings.

Exercise Researchers Find "More Is Better" Mindset Overrated

A new study reports that you don't have to spend hours at the gym—or even break a sweat—to reap psychological benefits from small doses of low intensity, easy physical activity.

Depression and Psychological Nourishment

Depression arises from a failure to achieve "psychological nourishment".

Superhero Therapy—Healing through fiction

Do you enjoy reading fiction, watching fantasy or science fiction TV shows, or reading Superhero comics? What if these have a potential to help us better manage our mental health?

How a Suicide Attempt Can Affect the Brain

Following a failed suicide attempt, acute CO poisoning causes serious mental health problems due to the death of neurons in vulnerable brain regions.