Depression and Society

Americans are obsessed with happiness, yet increasingly depressed: Some 15 million Americans battle the disease. Cross-cultural studies of happiness may shed light on this paradox.

Recent Posts on Depression

Postpartum Depression: Whose Problem Is It?

When a medical condition intersects with several areas of specialization, the focus becomes diluted, thereby making it impossible for it to be given full attention from any one of the multidisciplinary areas of study or practice.

The Deep Dark Hole of Depression

Depression is scary to some and familiar to others. But everyone knows how easy it can be to fall into the depression hole. What we all need to realize though is that regardless of whether we fall in the trap or not, we don't have to live there. We don't have to make a home there. This article distinguishes between living in depression and acknowledging that it's there.

Embracing Hardship, a Surprising Secret to Happiness

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on June 29, 2015 in Feeling It
We try to avoid pain and difficulty. Research shows that embracing it will help.

When The Apple Falls Close to the Tree

In many cases, children with clinically significant psychiatric symptoms have a parent or other family member(s) with the same, often undiagnosed, issues.

How to Stop Re-Creating Your Past and Finally Break Free

By Jennice Vilhauer Ph.D. on June 28, 2015 in Living Forward
If no matter how hard you try you keep ending up in the same place, it may be that you don’t realize you are creating your life by recreating the past over and over again because the brain works on the principle of anticipation. Learn how to break free of the cycle that is keeping you trapped.

Marvel Comics' Daredevil Shows the Experience of Depression

Once again, the creators behind Marvel Comics' "Daredevil" masterfully use the comics form to illustrate psychological maladies, this time the depression suffered by the title character, Matt Murdock aka Daredevil.

6 Signs You Might Want to Call a Therapist

Depressive thinking can inhibit help-seeking behaviors.

Overcoming Garden Variety Moodiness

If you tend to moodiness and would like an approach that is "psychology" or "psychiatry light," give this a try.

If You've Been Down, Up Your Health Game to Avoid Stroke

By Temma Ehrenfeld on June 26, 2015 in Open Gently
After a depression, you're still at risk for stroke. The best solution is to exercise.

An Honest, Heartfelt Portrayal of Bipolar Disorder

Hollywood depictions of mental illness usually are far off the mark. In Infinitely Polar Bear, Mark Ruffalo gives a rich, three dimensional, and deeply sympathetic performance as the bipolar father of two young girls.

Coping with Loneliness: Finding Your Way Out of the Dark

Loneliness can be so agonizing that it often presses us to seek a quick remedy, something to numb the pain. Here are a few suggestions to help you make your way back out of the darkness without introducing new regrets.

Inside Out: A Psychologist's Take

By Jeremy Clyman Psy.D on June 25, 2015 in Reel Therapy
Why is the new animated film "Inside Out" so popular? It might have something to do with how the characters, which are a young girl's emotional states, are actually so much more....

Taboo of Male Rape Keeps Victims Silent

The stigmatization of male rape victims is harsh, such that survivors may not identify as victims, or realize that they have experienced a sexual assault.

Does Love Change Your Brain?

Falling in love may be more than just an emotional experience; it might alter your brain chemistry.

Reflections on Pixar's "Inside-Out" and the Neglect of Shame

Distinguishing whether you are depressed because you have experienced a prolonged state of sadness, or because you have experienced a prolonged state of shame, is critically important.

Trends in Youth Psychiatric Treatment: The Plot Thickens

A major new study looks at changes in the rates of child psychiatric disorders and their treatment. Its combination of both good and bad news will be a challenge to the cherry pickers on both sides of the psychiatry debate.

Therapy That Makes Life Worth Living

There is no magic pill for mental health, nor a quick fix for years of ingrained thoughts and behaviors.

Releasing Constipated Grief

By Kimberly Key on June 23, 2015 in Counseling Keys
Chronic complaining is one of the many side effects of constipated grief. Sometimes people have cumulative grief from traumas and losses that have piled up. They are deep storehouses of pain that the person hasn’t been able to fully process or release, so they get clogged up.

The Rocky Transition to Parenthood

Unrealistic expectations fuel our difficulties in the early days of parenthood.

The Secret to a Fulfilling Life Is Not What You Might Think

The secret to a fulfilling life is not what you might think.

Good Pain, Bad Pain: Can You Tell the Difference?

There comes a day when you realize what you really need is a babysitter, coach, therapist or a bootcamp.

Inside Out: Emotional Intelligence Made (Maybe Too) Easy

This movie makes it fun to ponder emotional conflict, but it needs a sequel on the risk of using sadness as a way to get love. Til then, we can learn more about our inner conflicts from gorgeous graphics than boring buzzwords.

Infinitely Polar Bear: Rare Portrayal of Bipolar Disorder

By Suzanne Lachmann Psy.D. on June 19, 2015 in Me Before We
Infinitely Polar Bear is the story of how love can provide the incentive to get better. Mark Ruffalo’s performance is gritty, believable and most certainly Oscar-Worthy.

The Emotional Topography of Grief

Loss—especially traumatic or tragic loss—creates a dark region in our world that will always be there.

Seeking Solitude but Finding Loneliness: Five Wrong Turns

Many of us feel the need to seek out solitude. Recently, though, I’ve been learning that this quest for time alone can be a gamble. Sometimes, when all that I’m seeking is a little solitude, I can take a wrong turn somewhere and find myself way out in a lonely place. Here are five wrong turns that might take us away from solitude and toward loneliness.

Is Too Much Sitting Making You Anxious?

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on June 19, 2015 in Minding the Body
We live in an age of anxiety and inactivity — and there’s growing evidence that the two are related. Dr. Megan Teychenne, lead author of a new paper on sitting and anxiety, explains.

What Can I Do About My Aching Back?

Nearly half of older adults report experiencing one episode of back pain in a calendar year. This pain can increase physical and social inactivity and decrease life satisfaction.

My Religion Is Kindness

By Tara Brach Ph.D. on June 17, 2015 in Finding True Refuge
One of the wonderful teachings of the Dalai Lama, something he says quite regularly, is “My religion is kindness.” When we hear that, it resonates, because it points to something at the core of all spiritual and humanistic paths. If we just dedicated our lives to kindness, to the qualities of friendliness and care, we would be directly serving peace on earth.

Young People, Not Alone in Their Despair

What is that cautionary tale? Things may not always—if ever—be as they seem.