Depression and Health

Mental anguish is hard on your health. People suffering from depression have three times the risk of experiencing a cardiac event. In fact, depression affects the entire body. It attacks the immune system, resulting in long term effects. Higher rates of diabetes and osteoporosis are found in people suffering from depression, for example.

Recent Posts on Depression

Why Your View of the Future Can Make You Depressed

Most people assume that if you're depressed, that colors your view of your future. New research turns that thinking on its head, showing that, for many, if your view of your future is negative to begin with, that can actually make you depressed. The flip side is that a positive view of your future stimulates greater mental health.

4 Keys to Happiness

Happiness is not about what you need from others, it is really about what you are willing to give to others.

Do “Autism Parents” Face Increased Stigma for Mental Health?

Despite the fact that mental health is centrally tied to our overall well-being, parents of children with autism may find themselves not only combating the general public’s shared stigma related to mental illness and therapeutic services, but must also contend with additional challenges in overcoming the stigmatization of supporting their own psychological needs.

6 Helpful Things to Say to a Depressed Person

By Jean Kim M.D. on July 27, 2015 in Culture Shrink
How can well-meaning people provide support to someone with depression, aside from avoiding tendencies towards judgment? How can one head towards greater understanding and connect with someone who is suffering?

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

Summer Is the Most Depressing Time of Year

I know most everybody thinks that the winter holidays are the most depressing time of year, but that isn’t true. More suicides happen from the end of July through the month of August than at any other time—and we don’t know why.

Break Out of Your Boredom

People can feel imprisoned by their boredom. They are stuck in feeling restless and unmotivated with no hope of finding freedom. But there is a way out. Much like any prison break, your way out is to begin by tunneling down.

The Most Annoying Mistake Anxious People Make Every Day

Everyone wants to be heard. There's nothing wrong with wanting people to know your opinions, or how you feel. However, you may be driving others away when you open your mouth. Learn how to sharpen your communication skills and feel less stress and more calm and inner-peace.

Treating Eating Disorders the New-Fashioned Way

The establishment and assuredness of a safe and trusting relationship between patient and therapist prior to making the transition from office to on-line, plus symptoms being well under control or gone, then YES, my experience has shown that continued progress and recovery is possible, particularly for eating disorder patients with underlying anxiety & depression.

It's a Step, Not a Stop, on your Journey

Savor every single step of the journey for what it is . . . . a step, not your final "stop."

4 Mental Health Disorders That May Thrive on Loneliness

By Kira Asatryan on July 23, 2015 in The Art of Closeness
It's possible you're not mentally ill. You're just lonely.

Why Lisa Lampanelli is a ‘Spiritual Gangster’

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 23, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Lisa Lampanelli shares how helping others can help develop a strong self-concept.

Nature Calms the Mind—Even in Photos

By Temma Ehrenfeld on July 23, 2015 in Open Gently
Brain research on why nature is calming and restorative.

Freud had DP at the Acropolis; Today Teens at Venice Beach

By Elena Bezzubova on July 22, 2015 in The Search for Self
Physical and physiological stressors - bright light, overheating, dehydration, sudden climate change, spinning or fever - can precipitate fleeting feelings of unreality of oneself and the surrounding world. These transitory non-pathological episodes are characteristic for adolescents. Sometimes the episodes foreshow the full blown depersonalization-derealization syndrome.

Hormonal Changes that Trigger Depression in Women

One in four women will experience an episode of depression at least once in their lives.

What Your Financial Health Says About Your Mental Health

Studies show the likelihood of having a mental health problem is three times higher among people who have debt.

Am I Being Punished?

If we were punished for every mistake, it would for sure be a depressing world. None of us gets what we deserve, and that is usually a good thing.

Psychotherapy vs. Medications: The Verdict Is In

Both psychiatrists and psychologists devote their careers to helping people with mental health issues. As promising as neuroscience may be for helping researchers find clues to the brain, the real key to treatment lies in therapy, not drugs. Your best bet is to explore all options when you or your loved ones seek help.

The Psychology of Box Set Binging

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on July 21, 2015 in In Excess
Recent media stories have reported on the alleged negative effects of box-set bingeing (‘Watching TV box-set marathons is warning sign you're lonely and depressed - and will also make you fat’). But what do we know about box-set bingeing psychologically and is it really bad for our health?

The Narcissism Test

By Craig Malkin PhD on July 21, 2015 in Romance Redux
The Narcissism Test -- What's Your Score?

5 Ceremonies of Healing

Simple ceremonies that you create and enact can help you heal emotionally and maintain your mental health.

Dying From Pain Relief

By Mark Borigini M.D. on July 19, 2015 in Overcoming Pain
That is, when it comes to depression, NSAIDs might not be helpful, their mechanism of action is not yet fully explained, and, really, most would agree that being diagnosed with a heart attack or stroke would most likely not result in less depression in an already depressed individual.

Learning From the Inside Out

Learning from the inside out centers around the role of emotion in shaping our lives. Disney’s new film, Inside Out, presents current thinking in neuroscience in a format that allows animated characters to teach us how to live life.

Anger Problems

It is nearly impossible to understand other people's perspectives when angry or resentful. You're bound to oversimplify and see only the negative aspects of something.

17 Minutes a Day?

How many minutes is too many minutes to spend focused on your cellphone?

Can You Be Too Fat to Lose Weight?

When an unfortunate hopelessness grips the morbidly obese

Is Fame Really Worth Risking Mental Health?

I would not have predicted the stranglehold it Reality TV would come to have on “entertainment” today. It wasn’t a bad notion to use TV to shed light on the human condition. However, as a PsyD and LCSW, I know that whenever human beings are pitted against each other in a public forum, it triggers instincts and unpredictable behavior in them.

A Life Interrupted: The Tim Bransfield Story

In the summer of 2002, Tim Bransfield had it all. Then Tim crashed his mother’s car head-on into a tree at eighty miles per hour, and, as he says in his book, “everything went dark.”

Suicide: From Darkness to Light

Odds are you or someone you know has been affected directly or indirectly by suicide. If you know someone who lives in the darkness, or if you are personally struggling to find the light, don't give up hope. No matter how dark life may seem there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

F%$& Shame, TEDx and Mental Health

By Adi Jaffe Ph.D. on July 13, 2015 in All About Addiction
Many of us don't give the proper weight to the use of mental health labels. As this talk shows, diagnostic labels can actually impact the way in which labeled individuals perform. If nothing else, this fact should make us more wary of using these labels as everyday placeholders to describe those around us. We may just be sentencing them to meeting our low expectations.