All About Deception

Studies show that the average person lies several times a day. Some of those are biggies (“I’ve always been faithful to you,”) but more often, they are little white lies (“Of course that dress looks good on you!”) Some forms of deception aren’t exactly lies—  like combovers or nodding when you’re not really listening. And then there are lies we tell ourselves for reasons that run the gamut, from healthy maintenance of self-esteem to serious delusions beyond our control. 

Recent posts on Deception

In Defense of Language

It is critical that we respect our only means of making sense of our world.

Facts, Truths, Beliefs, Opinions, and "Alternative Facts"

By Clifford N Lazarus Ph.D. on March 25, 2017 in Think Well
In this time of "alternative facts," it's helpful to consider the difference among actual facts, truths, beliefs, preferences and opinions.
Wikimedia Commons

Is Using Profanity a Sign of Honesty?

A recent paper suggests that profanity may be a reflection of emotional honesty and candor. However, closer examination of the studies' results casts doubt on this idea.

What Happens When You Lie by Telling the Truth?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 22, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Deception is a common activity among people. There are many ways to do it, and they have different influences on ourselves and other people.
Stockfresh

Is Your Relationship Toxic?

You may not realize your relationship is harming you or be able to leave. Find out the symptoms, whether there's hope for change, and steps you can put into action.
Richard McDowell/Shutterstock

Self-Deception Helps Us Accomplish Goals

By Tim Cole Ph.D. on March 20, 2017 in Intimate Portrait
More often than not, we lead with our goals and desires, not the facts. New research on how our ability to delude ourselves can be quite useful.
eldar nurkovic/Shutterstock

Tears of Pain and Tears of Joy

Crying can be a powerful expression of pain or joy; however it can also be used as a manipulative device. Genuine crying is a window into a person's emotional condition.

What's the Difference Between Me and You?

By Neel Burton M.D. on March 14, 2017 in Hide and Seek
What makes me me and you you?

How to Talk About Politics in a Post-Truth World

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on March 13, 2017 in Supersurvivors
Political discussions are increasingly devolving into accusations of “lying" and "fake news.” How do we have real conversations in this world of “alternative facts"?

Do Dogs Ever Lie to or Try to Deceive People?

New data shows that dogs are capable of being deceptive around people when it is in their own self-interest.

From Post-Truth to Post-Lies

Worried about the dominance of "alternative facts" and "post-truth politics?" Behavioral science points the way to solving this problem!

When Silence Is Deafening

By Kaja Perina on March 07, 2017 in Brainstorm
A tiny act or calculation, including the decision to keep a secret, can eventually and invisibly sculpt a person’s relationships, even his or her identity.
K. Ramsland

The Predator's Advantage

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 04, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
The predator's advantage involves a clear plan, with an escape route.

After Cheating: Restoring Relationship Trust

After so many lies and secrets, can trust ever be restored?

Texas Bill Could Enable Doctors to Legally Lie to You

By Cortney S. Warren Ph.D. on March 02, 2017 in Naked Truth
Although Texas Senate Bill 25 may seem to be about abortion and your right to sue your doctor—it is actually fundamentally about medical ethics and honesty.

The Elephant in the Room

Concern over Donald Trump's mental health has 26,000 mental health professionals stating that he is unfit to serve as president of the United States. We agree and here's why.

Why do People Lie? Part Two.

By Joseph A. Shrand M.D. on February 25, 2017 in The I-M Approach
Who is lying? Who is telling the truth? Strategic lying is all around us. So we form groups with people who share our values and we can trust. We are desperate to trust.

How I Learned to Stop Lying

By Jennifer Haupt on February 21, 2017 in One True Thing
I couldn’t tolerate even one person knowing what had happened to me — even my therapist. The shame was crippling.

Why Do People Lie?

By Joseph A. Shrand M.D. on February 20, 2017 in The I-M Approach
Everyone lies, some to save face, others to deceive for personal gain. This blog explores white lies, those untruths we say to preserve our value in the eyes of someone else.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: No Stealing

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on February 19, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Taking over a loved one's time, attention, property, space or decisions without explicit permission from him or her is stealing. Boundary violations can threaten a relationship.

The Abuse of Language by Groups Seeking Social Change

By Hank Davis on February 16, 2017 in Caveman Logic
You're driving me crazy with your over-the-top language

The Con of Propaganda

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in Insight Therapy
If you don’t hear much about propaganda, that’s what you’re hearing.

When Children Lie

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on February 10, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Research into how effective adults are in detecting deception in children have turned up some surprising findings.
Gage Skidmore

The Science of Solving Alternative Facts

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on February 10, 2017 in Intentional Insights
Worried about the dominance of "alternative facts" in politics? This article has some tips for solving this problem!

Think Someone Might Be Lying to You? Time Will Tell.

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on February 10, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
Across human communication contexts, nothing is more important than truth. A new meta-analysis describes one important feature that distinguishes fact from fiction.

“Is Your Pet a Psychopath?”

How did deception evolve, and how do you know it's there? Learn these 4 simple, but overlooked signs.
pixabay.com/pexels.com

Why Do Americans Like Sociopaths?

What makes sociopathy so alluring, so exciting? Nominations are open for the Madoff Prize.

“It Takes One to Know One,” Truth or Half-Truth?

By Leon F Seltzer Ph.D. on February 08, 2017 in Evolution of the Self
Besides my title, consider these expressions: “That’s the pot calling the kettle black”; “I know you are, but what am I?”; “Look who’s talking!” or You should talk!” or even...

The Burden of Memory (part 1)

Recent cognitive science supports the view that memories are confabulations of the past rehearsed for the future. What about historical memory?