All About Creativity

Even those of us not in explicitly creative fields must come up with new ideas and insights in order to move ahead. How can we shake up the way we think? Creativity has been pegged to conducive environments, perfect collaborators, personality traits, serendipity, and even spiritual muses. While research psychologists are interested in increasing innovative thinking, clinical psychologists sometimes encourage patients to use artistic expression as a way to confront difficult feelings.

Recent posts on Creativity

Storming on Bastille Day

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on July 25, 2016 in Play in Mind
Sometimes, we learn most when things go haywire.

Art Thinking or The Importance of Inventing Point B

By Tim Leberecht on July 25, 2016 in The Romance of Work
Business is too important to be left to business people. What if companies thought and acted more like artists?

Leslie Jones Is a Movie Star Who Makes Me Laugh and Cry

The more diversity of characters and actors we see on our stages and screens, the more opportunities we can create for identification and empathy between one another.
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Is Your School Helping or Hurting Your Child’s Literacy?

Reading is key to success. Five common teaching practices that don't work; and six ways to support kids in acquiring a love of reading that encourages learning across the lifespan.

How Much Can We Borrow from One Another?

By Sheila Kohler on July 21, 2016 in Dreaming for Freud
Isaac Newton reportedly said back in 1676: "If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."

Thinking Visually With DeAngela Napier

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Brick by Brick
DeAngela Napier is a visual thinker. Napier, who works as a photographer, video producer and editor, thinks of her work as visual storytelling...

Time Alone Saps the Willpower of People Who Are Neurotic

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Living Single
For some people, time alone is rejuvenating. New research shows that for neurotic people, just thinking about spending time by themselves can instead undermine their motivation.

The Writing Life: An Interview With Natalie Goldberg

By Mark Matousek on July 19, 2016 in Ethical Wisdom
The groundbreaking author of Writing Down the Bones talks about creativity as a spiritual practice, her cancer journey, and choosing passion over discipline

Aliens and Monsters

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on July 19, 2016 in Play in Mind
Science fiction authors always mean to open readers’ eyes wider, intending to broaden their perspective.

The Beautiful Randomness of the Band Suicide

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 18, 2016 in Brick by Brick
When describing hardcore punk music, Lester Bangs wrote that “hardcore is the womb.”

Future Thinking and False Memories

Have you ever had a vivid memory that turned out to be false? New research suggests that false memories may actually be associated with a number of positive psychological traits.

The Most Inspiring Book I've Read

Want to be blown away by a tale you should already know but likely don't, about brilliant characters who should be as famous as Einstein, but aren't well-known? Read this book.

Play Foul and Fair

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on July 14, 2016 in Play in Mind
Rule breakers come in three varieties: the cheater, the spoilsport, and the game changer. We despise the first, we puzzle over the second, and usually, we admire the third.

Two Psychological Approaches to Photography

By Stanton Peele on July 14, 2016 in Addiction in Society
The two greatest American photographers, Diane Arbus and Robert Frank, while taking very different approaches to photography, both peered into America's soul, at a personal cost.

Dissecting Sheldon Cooper

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Media Spotlight
If you've seen even a single episode of the hit sitcom, The Big Bang Theory, then you're familiar with Dr. Sheldon Cooper. Understanding the antics of an eccentric genius.
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Creating Fictional Worlds That Feel Real

By Laura Otis Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Rethinking Thought
When you read a novel, do you know what color hair each characters has?

Measuring the Muse

By Sunil Iyengar on July 13, 2016 in The Value of Art
For the most compelling proofs of the arts’ benefits on individuals, one looks increasingly to cognitive and developmental psychology.

Why We Still Love ‘Please Kill Me’

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Brick by Brick
In “Please Kill Me,” Gillian McCain and Legs McNeil have delivered to their readers one of the most important ingredients of effective therapy - unconditional positive regard

3 New Findings On Human Intelligence

The latest insights on intelligence, imagination, potential causes for the rise in IQ scores over the years, and how behavioral genetics is related to education and grit.

The Case for Copying

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 08, 2016 in How To Do Life
Why rote learning such as memorizing and copying is underrated.

Why We’re Politically Stalled Out

It's not just that we disagree with one another. We have trouble putting ourselves in our political opponents' shoes. I explain why that's bad for everyone involved.

Write Better by Thinking Like a Fox

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on July 06, 2016 in Creating in Flow
Two new novels demonstrate, by showing not telling, how to get into the mind of some unusual characters.

The Best Book for Serious (And Humor) Writers

Advises Lerner, "If you are a writer, especially one who has been unable to make your work count or stick, you must grab your demons by the neck and face them down."

Creativity and the Importance of the Incubation Period

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on July 06, 2016 in A Sideways View
Reports on creativity suggest that after working hard, the best advice is to stop. The "aha" experience often comes in the shower, while cycling to work, or walking the dog.
Josephine Ensign

Writing Through Trauma

On writing and living through complex trauma.
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Writing Your Narrative From Trauma to Addiction: 4 Prompts

As an advocate of writing for healing, my experience has shown that childhood trauma can lead to addiction in adulthood. Writing one's story is a way to heal. Blog offers tips.

How You Think of Creativity Matters!

Are you too fixed in your beliefs about creativity?

"Peripatetic Meetings" Promote Health and Creative Thinking

New research shows that holding a "peripatetic meeting" (in which you walk instead of sit) improves physical well-being and boosts creativity.

Superfluidity: The Science and Psychology of Optimizing Flow

Have you ever had a 'flow' experience that felt as if you were "standing outside yourself"? The science and psychology of 'superfluidity' help to explain the highest tier of flow.

Obey the Flower: Lessons Learned From Drawing a Rose

How a practice of drawing roses helped me appreciate the transformative power of beauty.