What Is Consumer Behavior?

Consumer behavior is a hotbed of psychological research as it ties together issues of communication (advertising and marketing), identity (you are what you buy), social status, decision-making, and mental and physical health. Corporations use findings about consumer behavior to determine how best to market products; you can put the information to use in deciding what, when, and why to buy.

Recent Posts on Consumer Behavior

Medical Ethics is Healthier Than Business Ethics

Traditional medical ethics puts patient welfare first. As corporations increasingly control health care, business ethics replace medical ethics. Doctors and patients must work together to defend the doctor-patient relationship.

Worries about the Apple Watch and the Internet-of-Things

There’s a lot happening in the internet-of-things, most of it beyond the horizon of our thing-filled lifestyles. The Apple Watch is the latest and perhaps most telling thing of all. Should we worry about this dazzling distraction? What will its social impact be? What are the environmental and labor costs associated with this new digital fashion accessory?

Tattoos and Identity:

A website urges you to tattoo a song lyric on "your skin and soul." What's going on?

Video vs Text: The Brain Perspective

They say video killed the radio star. The question is: Did it also kill the print star? And what does the answer mean for online content marketing?

Is It Time to Ban Food Ads?

We are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that is linked to 18 percent of all deaths for those ages 40-85. It has boosted medical costs by an estimated $150 billion annually and has sent the incidents of related illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease soaring. Obesity is also related to depression and diminished quality of life. It’s never been more apparent

The Coming Battle over Serotonin and Depression

There was never any valid scientific evidence showing clinical depression was associated with lowered levels of serotonin: It was all smoke and mirrors. But such is the power of Big Pharma – and such is the power of a good story – that many academics bought into it, and careers were built on the concept of lowered serotonin causing depression.

Why You Shouldn't Fear Going Solo

By Sophia Dembling on April 27, 2015 in The Introvert's Corner
Some people fear they'll be judged and pitied if they do things alone, but it's also possible people will be impressed.

Is it Time to Change our Narrative about Climate Change?

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in More Than Mortal
One thing I have learned from my own research as a social psychologist is that fear is not always a good tool for changing attitudes. But fear is what we often use to get people to care about the environment.

What Can We Learn From Reading Online Reviews?

By Gregory R. Maio Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in Attitude Check
To write a review or not to write a review (and simply use stars)

Medical Model? Recovery Model? No Problem

By Stephen Seager M.D. on April 20, 2015 in BrainTalk
Regarding the treatment of serious mental Illness, there is currently a fundamental rift between two camps: the Medical Model and the Recovery Model.

Using the Right Innovation Tool for the Right Innovation Job

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Innovation You
The strategies you use to market a breakthrough new product will not help you re-conceptualize the way you build an old one. So how do you decide which tool to use when it comes to your innovation project? Here are three factors to consider.

Subliminal Messages Can Fortify Inner Strength

Subliminal messages have the power to fortify your inner strength and self-confidence on and off the court.

A serialistion of my book “Cancer Is My Teacher” – Part 1

By Lucy O'Donnell on April 18, 2015 in Cancer Is a Teacher
Do you ever have a niggling feeling that something isn't right medically? Are you chronically tired for no reason? Has your Doctor often ignored these complaints and put it down to the stress of modern day living? Well, if this resonates with you, then read on. You could save your life.

What Makes Us Tick?

They met in a airport because of a book that one of them was reading, the same the other had recently read. The conversation was so stimulating that they decided to continue it online and share it with their readers. They both believe this will be the first of an endless series of talks about the subject—what makes people tick—that tickles them the most.

It Is Good to Smell You Again, My Friend

By Arthur Dobrin D.S.W. on April 14, 2015 in Am I Right?
What sniffing dogs have to teach us about friendship.

5 Reasons to Go Meat Free Right Now!

In what ways can your mind, body, and spirit benefit from going meatless?

Faulty Reporting on ADHD

By Christopher Lane Ph.D. on April 11, 2015 in Side Effects
Newspaper of record criticized for its tardy response to overmedicalization.

5 Reasons Studies Say You Have to Choose Your Friends Wisely

While it makes sense to befriend people you come in contact with regularly—like neighbors and co-workers—research shows the importance of being selective about who's in your social circle.

The Cerebellum, Cerebral Cortex, and Autism Are Intertwined

Neuroscientists have identified a new marker for autism based on abnormal connectivity between specific regions of the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex.

Selling the Couch: The Business of Psychotherapy

The business side of private practice is something that eludes many, if not most, mental health professionals. As an outgrowth of his practice, Philadelphia-area psychologist Melvin Varghese has created an iTunes podcast called Selling the Couch, which is an on-going series of interviews with thought leaders in practice building, marketing and social media.

Making the Most of Your Charitable Giving

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in How To Do Life
Most people work hard for the money they give to charity, but that money often doesn't do as much good as it could.

Skinny Shaming

By Alexis Conason Psy.D. on April 07, 2015 in Eating Mindfully
Sometimes I feel like I'm living in the Goldilocks fable. This one is too fat…that one is too thin…is anyone just right? While the media has continued to bombard us with the usual fat shaming messages, I’ve also been noticing a lot of skinny shaming recently.

Vitamania! 15 Vital Facts About the Vitamins We Love

By Meg Selig on April 07, 2015 in Changepower
Are you a "vitamaniac?" 15 vital facts about vitamins and supplements, plus 5 questions to ask yourself before you take a vitamin or other supplement.

Greenwashing the Earth

Ever felt a little weird when you check into a hotel room and been invited to save the planet along with its corporate owners by reusing your towels? The reason may be that you've just been greenwashed. What does that mean? And what does 'green' itself mean any more?

Do We Necessarily Need to Be Social Animals?

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 06, 2015 in How To Do Life
An internal debate on how social to be, in and outside of work.

The Monk Chat from Thailand

Sitting with a young monk in Chiang Mai yields eons of wisdom on what holds us back from life and ourselves and what to do about it.

What's in a Name?

By Allen J Frances M.D. on April 05, 2015 in DSM5 in Distress
Diagnosis and empathy are necessary partners in any therapeutic relationship, fully complementary and in no way incompatible.

Can’t Kick a Bad Habit? You’re Probably Doing It Wrong

By Nir Eyal on April 03, 2015 in Automatic You
A technique to use identity change for behavior change.

The True Heart of Money

By Michael F. Kay on April 02, 2015 in Financial Life Focus
Money might be the target of your desire. The reason you work, get out of bed in the morning, maybe even the driving force behind the endless hours you devote to its creation.

The Attractiveness of Personality Traits

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 02, 2015 in A Sideways View
Some traits are more attractive than others. But there are downsides to all extreme scorers. Is there a downside to being a sociable extravert or a highly agreeable person?