What Is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. Unlike traditional Freudian psychoanalysis, which probes childhood wounds to get at the root causes of conflict, CBT focuses on solutions, encouraging patients to challenge distorted cognitions and change destructive patterns of behavior.

Recent Posts on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Ridding Happiness Contaminants 1: Ego Anxiety

By Russell Grieger Ph.D. on September 04, 2015 in Happiness on Purpose
Anxiety cannot help but destroy one’s ability to be happy. Learn how to eliminate one form of anxiety, ego anxiety, and unconditionally accept oneself, and live a life free of anxiety.

A Pilot Fearful During Flight as a Passenger

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on September 03, 2015 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
A pilot writes, "I understand all of the concepts of flying and the safety relating to it. This is not my problem. I’m afraid only when I’m a passenger. It’s the feeling of not being in control. Also, my fear fear is associated with the plane’s movements, and not knowing if a turn is coming or when it is coming."

Your Feelings Are Keeping You Stuck

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on September 01, 2015 in Creating in Flow
Using a bit of profanity for the sake of humor and enlightenment, a new book explores feelings and their uselessness in solving your most troublesome life issues.

Examples of the 4 Things Competent Therapists Do

By Michael Karson Ph.D., J.D. on September 01, 2015 in Feeling Our Way
The problem with principles is that they can lead to rules and checklists instead of empathic understanding.

Solving Problems in Your Dreams

By Kristian Marlow on August 29, 2015 in The Superhuman Mind
Combine your next all-nighter with meaningful rest through lucid dreaming.

The One Thing to Remember to Beat Insomnia

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, or CBT-I, is a powerful non-drug treatment. Find out one of the main principles that underlies its effectiveness.

The Best Clinical Story Ever?

Great clinical stories teach us how to think, they liberate the mind from its ruts, and most importantly thy raise the bar of excellence to counter complacency and mediocrity.

Psychotherapy as a Learning Experience

Therapy is a learning experience. Perhaps findings from the neuroscience of learning and memory can suggest ways to improve the storage of memories that are formed during a therapy session.

9 Reasons You Need a Personal Motto

By Meg Selig on August 21, 2015 in Changepower
When complicated ideas get lost in space, a good motto can remind you of what's really important.

After a Suicide Tragedy, Will There Be Copycats?

A recently published study entitled 'One followed by many?--Long-term effects of a celebrity suicide on the number of suicidal acts on the German railway net', found the number of railway suicidal acts, in the following two weeks, more than doubled in Germany.

ADHD Medication May Enhance Hypnotizability

By Traci Stein PhD, MPH on August 19, 2015 in The Integrationist
Hypnosis, an enhanced state of inner focus, can be an effective tool for improving a range of symptoms, including those related to mood and learning. The ADHD drug methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin) has been shown to increase hypnotizability in a sample of patients with ADHD and thus may enable patients to benefit from adding hypnosis to their treatment regimens.

Four Things Competent Therapists Do

That’s only 4 things I’m looking for when evaluating in-office individual talk therapy. In my experience, the vast majority of therapists practice none of them.

Can Screaming or Yelling Be Bad for Your Relationship?

Many people think that they can’t help raising their voices. They think it is “normal” and is largely out of their control. But is it really? So, why do people scream or yell in the first place?

Do You Suffer From Mental Myopia?

When our mental myopia minimizes another human being to just one characteristic (typically negative), we aren’t granting them the same value, dignity, and worth we would want granted to ourselves in the same situation.

Can You Lose Your Eyesight for Psychological Reasons?

What is referred to as 'medically unexplained visual loss' or non-organic visual loss (NOVL), is reported to occur in 1 to 5% of patients attending ophthalmology clinics. In many cases it continues without improvement for an extended period.

Can Improv Comedy Treat Social Anxiety?

By Jon Fortenbury on August 02, 2015 in NeuroProgress
People are increasingly turning to improv comedy (theatre made up on the spot) to reduce social anxiety. The reason it's working for some and not all is simple, but powerful.

Take Action – Now!

Nothing, absolutely nothing, will change without doing what's necessary to bring it about. Wishing won't, hoping won't, even praying won't. Only doing will. In this blog through the magical ACT formula, bring more pleasure, satisfaction, and happiness into your life.

Withdrawal and Inactivity Feed Depression

If you're depressed, it's natural to feel like withdrawing from others and it can be hard to motivate yourself to do anything. Unfortunately, giving into these behaviors is likely to make your mood worse, not better. Here are some small tips on how to get back on course to mental health and happiness.

6 Ways to Stop (Mentally) Beating Yourself Up

How to stop being your own worst bully.

Does Change Come from Within?

The environmental location of causality—change comes from without rather than from within—is awfully convenient for therapists, who happen to find themselves in their patients’ environments.

Is the Taboo Against “Blaming Victims” Over?

By Izzy Kalman on July 27, 2015 in Resilience to Bullying
The politically correct anti-bullying academic anti-bullying field has been shunning approaches to bullying that focus on teaching victims how to solve their problems because they don't want to be accused of "blaming victims." Researchers, discovering that the bully-focused approach doesn't work, may finally be ignoring the taboo against blaming victims.

Social Anxiety Diminished by Brain Signals and Re-Thinking

Social anxiety and its treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy can be studied with advanced brain imaging. Both the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala are involved.

Beyond Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 21, 2015 in How To Do Life
CBT needs to move from THE Therapy to being just one tool in the tool box.

17 Minutes a Day?

How many minutes is too many minutes to spend focused on your cellphone?

The Anxious Stories We Tell Ourselves

Stop jumping to conclusions.

For Depression: Mindfulness Therapy Works as Well as Drugs

Mindfulness therapy may offer you relief—without any unwanted side effects.

Ninety Minute Therapy Sessions

By Isadora Alman MFT on July 06, 2015 in Sex & Sociability
Psychtherapy sessions, like other intense encounters, must have a length that satisfies all parties involved.

A Waking Dream

By Greg O'Brien on July 06, 2015 in On Pluto
The barkers have started selling new cures. Praise the Lord and pass the Aricept!

Why Your Time in the Shower Is Vital to the Rest of Your Day

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on July 02, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
Experiencing your shower in a different way might change your day.

Is This a Portrait of a Narcissist?

By Donna Barstow on June 30, 2015 in Ink Blots Cartoons
Maybe you shouldn't say no - to anything - until you know yourself a little better.