Understanding Child Development

The speedy physical and psychological changes that children undergo from birth through adolescence often leave parents wondering how best to care for them at each stage. PT's experts weigh in on topics such how to talk so kids will listen, and when to back off and allow them to fail.

Recent posts on Child Development

Stop Blaming the Kids, Start Blaming Bad Social Policies

By Michael Ungar Ph.D. on October 23, 2016 in Nurturing Resilience
Resilience is political. Good social policies may be the most important factor for raising mentally and physically healthy children.

The Right Dose of Screen Time for Kids

By Vanessa LoBue, Ph.D. on October 22, 2016 in The Baby Scientist
On Friday, the American Academy of Pediatrics changed their policy on screen time for children under the age of 2 on Friday. Here's what the new policy means for your kids.

The Pitt-Jolie Divorce, Five Takeaways

What can we take away from the highly publicized Jolie/Pitt divorce and apply to our own relationships?

Feeling Victimized by Presidential Campaign Updates?

Has the pain of your experiences as a sexual abuse survivor been re-activated by national news? Here are 7 suggestions to promote your well-being

Reframing Temperament: “Difficult” vs. “Stressed”

By Stuart Shanker DPhil on October 18, 2016 in Self-Reg
Parents need to understand what their child’s limbic system is “telling” them. And when they’re able, children and teens need to do the same.

3 Ways to Give Your Kids a 1980’s Halloween to Remember

By Kristen Lee Ed.D., LICSW on October 18, 2016 in Reset 24/7
Is the hype of Halloween wearing you out already? Take a time travel back to the Halloween's of yesteryear, before the age of Pinterest and lactose intolerance.

"Mine, Mine, Mine!": The Psychology of Property

By Ruth Lee Johnson J.D. on October 18, 2016 in So Sue Me
"Mine! Mine! Mine!" It is one of the first words that toddlers learn. But where does property come from, and what does it really mean? Scholars, philosophers, and toddlers answer.

Why Do We Tell Boys to "Man Up"?

How does telling your son to "man up" impact him later in life. This is what the research tells us.

An Overview of ADHD Care

ADHD affects far more than just attention, and affects not only children but their family and relationships. Here's what you need to know to manage it comprehensively.

Childhood Sexual Abuse: How Men Can Help Women Recover

By Michael Castleman M.A. on October 17, 2016 in All About Sex
One woman in six has survived child sex abuse. Even years later, men can help them recover. Here's how.

Family Stories at the Birth of Humanity

Our ancestors told stories around the evening fire. It was important then and it is still important now.

What Do You Mean, Self-Esteem?

By Nick Luxmoore on October 15, 2016 in Young People Up Close
Like so many well-meaning behavioural interventions, the idea of self-esteem is simplistic. Without a secure sense of self, good experiences are likely to wash over us.

What Great Parents Do: Are You Doing It?

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on October 14, 2016 in Singletons
75 Bite-size chunks of sensible strategies for raising children. How many do you use?

Understanding and Treating Selective Mutism

By Barbara Markway Ph.D. on October 13, 2016 in Shyness Is Nice
Does your child speak freely and easily at home, but not at school or other public places? Find out if your child has selective mutism, a childhood anxiety disorder.

Not Just Bilingual—Biliterate!

An increasing number of states are offering a Seal of Biliteracy to high school students who can read and write well in two languages. We think this is a good idea.

When Your Child Plays Doctor

If you show an acceptance of your child's curiosity, your child's self-esteem will remain in tact.
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Bruce Springsteen: Born to Be Honest

By Michael Bader D.M.H. on October 12, 2016 in What Is He Thinking?
Bruce Springsteen's new book, "Born to Run," is not only a meticulous account of his rise to musical fame, but reflects insights born of over 30 years of deep psychotherapy.

Are Personality Traits Hereditary?

By Ugo Uche on October 11, 2016 in Promoting Empathy With Your Teen
Genes do not operate in isolation.
Dora Calott Wang

Growing Pains in the Teenage Brain

By Dora Calott Wang M.D. on October 11, 2016 in The Kitchen Shrink
Growing pains occur more for the teenage brain, than even the teenage body

The Pig Who Stuttered

Learn about what stuttering is and what can be done about it from one of the Looney Tunes!

What Do Early-Learners Need Most? Play!

A broad body of evidence finds that young children need more play time to succeed in school and life — both with their peers and with adults.

Staying in Touch With Real Babies: Correcting the AAP

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Moral Landscapes
The AAP's recommendations for infant sleep deal a major blow to the parent-infant dyad. One mom shows how sleep training violates the most sacred of bonds.

Parental Age & Mental Illness: The Maternal Dimension

The biggest and most comprehensive study of the effects of parental age on offspring mental illness confirms counter-tuitive predictions of the imprinted brain theory.
Image courtesy of vectorolie at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The Role of Shame in the 2016 Elections

Are both major-party candidates in this election driven by shame?

It’s Okay to Be an Angry Young Woman

By Guest Blogger on October 06, 2016 in The Guest Room
Teenage girls in fiction tend to be stubborn, moody, or brooding, but rarely are they seething with anger. Why not?
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Getting Unstuck

By Brad E Sachs Ph.D. on October 06, 2016 in Emptying The Nest
Which is more important to your young adult child—making you proud or keeping you worried? You and your child might be surprised by the answer.

Three Reasons for Teen Unhappiness and What to Do About It

By Tim Elmore on October 06, 2016 in Artificial Maturity
With all the resources and technology we have at our fingertips, is it safe to assume American kids would likely be the happiest?

A Dog Is More Likely to Ignore Bad Advice Than a Child

Both dogs and children imitate the behaviors that they see, however dogs are less likely to imitate behaviors that are not relevant to completing a task.

Words Are Words—How Can We Know a Candidate's Character?

By Suzanne Lachmann Psy.D. on October 05, 2016 in Me Before We
Chelsea and the Trump children have chosen very different avenues to invest their family resources.

How and When to Talk to Your Kids About Sex

New research indicates that 90% of kids learn about sex from online porn.