What Is Charisma?

Charisma is the ability to attract, charm, and influence the people around you. Charisma is often said to be a mysterious ineffable quality you either have or you don't, but it's actually easy to break down many of the key factors that make someone charismatic. Such factors include (but are not limited to): confidence, exuberance, optimism,  a ready smile, expressive body language, and a friendly, passionate voice.

Recent Posts on Charisma

The Psychological Appeal of Donald Trump

Like Peter Finch in the movie Network and like the American public, Trump is "mad (and rich) as hell and not going to take it anymore!"

Striving To Maximize Both Charm and Chutzpah

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on July 28, 2015 in Ambigamy
Etiquette is no longer enough to make a gentleman or gentlewoman, and actually never was. Aspiring gents must strive to maximize etiquette and character, humility and boldness, always seeking for better ways to speak their minds and be heard.

Pope Francis' Environmental Message

Pope Francis' encyclical on the ecological crisis strikes a blow to climate science deniers everywhere. He tells the truth about global warming and environmental decline using the combined powers of ecclesial authority, the scientific consensus, and a well-established communication network. Let's hope world leaders meeting in Paris in December follow his lead.

Understanding the LA Beast

Want a glimpse inside the mind of one of the world’s top competitive eaters? A guy who has eaten a full watermelon with zero utensils—in about 10 minutes? You MUST read this article!

Fetishism and the Thirst for More Life

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on June 16, 2015 in A Swim in Denial
Fetishism feels that certain people and things have power to protect us. Big money and big shots exert an uncanny fascination, so do lovers and religious symbols. Whether you call it fetishism, transference, or fandom, it’s magic and shapes us. The psychology of abandon investigates fetishism because our idols seem larger than life and beyond everyday constraints.

Parental Warmth: Simple, Powerful, and Often Challenging

Amidst all the chatter about parenting styles and techniques, it is easy to forget about the importance of warmth. This overlooked dimension is found to be critical to child development in study after study, so why don’t we give it the attention it deserves?

When a Sociopath Is Hell Bent on Destroying You

By Carrie Barron M.D. on April 13, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
Sociopaths (anti-social personality, psychopath) can decimate a life. The mental, emotional or physical trauma can be stunning. The aftermath of sociopathic is unique because the assault instills a dim world view, a shaky sense of safety and a feeling that one has been visited by evil. Here are 16 points of focus to begin recovery.

Hillary Clinton's Social Media Challenge

Obama was the classic Underdog archetype. Social media wasn’t his communications vehicle, it was part of his story. Don’t ask if Hillary Clinton will have a social media advantage because Obama did or if the Republicans will ever get it right. Ask if Hillary can adapt her archetype to social.

4 Ways to Boost Your Charisma

Most people think that charisma is a mysterious quality that people are born with. However, there has been a century of research on charisma, and nearly a half-century focusing specifically on what makes a person charismatic. As a result of this work, we can measure and enhance charisma.

Adoption in the Life of Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs' adoption provided an environment that helped him become the co-founder and major influence of Apple Computers, but his genetic inheritance was also crucial.

Humiliation, Recovery and Monica Lewinsky

By Carrie Barron M.D. on March 27, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
Public shaming, online harassment and cyber-bullying are ubiquitous but they were not always. This blog examines the heart wrenching plight of one woman and how she overcame humiliation to become a tour-de-force and an agent for public good.

On the Wisdom of Taking a Lover

By Sheila Kohler on March 27, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
When my ex- husband announced he had fallen in love with another woman, he said he still loved me and was not sure what to do. He felt terribly guilty as did his mistress and he had to tell me the truth. We had been married for ten years and were both in our early thirties

Do You Feel Sexy on the Inside?

By Rick Miller LICSW on March 23, 2015 in Unwrapped
Expanding the ways in which we feel “sexy” is good for everyone (yup, except maybe for the beauty industry that sells just one way).

Leaders: We Love Humble Leaders But Idolize Narcissists

By Ray Williams on March 17, 2015 in Wired for Success
Research shows that humble leaders whose focus is to serve others are equally successful, but more importantly, capture the hearts and loyalty of others.

Sparkle Versus Glow—and What That Means For Your Love Life

By Ken Page L.C.S.W. on March 14, 2015 in Finding Love
I recently had a dialogue with Sophia Dembling, author of Introverts in Love: The Quiet Way to Happily Ever After. Both of us had books come out at about the same time concerning the search for love. Her insights on the distinction between glow and sparkle hold one of the greatest keys to finding and keeping healthy love.

Using Art to 'Touch' Someone in a Juvenile Detention Center

Guest blogger and artist Elise Lunsford describes a unique and creative approach to promote reconnection and healing with a difficult client in a juvenile detention facility. In forensic settings, clinicians are warned not to touch the inmates. She demonstrates that art can allow us to reach out and touch those who therapists would otherwise hesitate to touch.

An Amish Surprise: Solving the Bipolar Puzzle

Do you know what Abraham Lincoln, Vincent Van Gogh, Ernest Hemingway and Marilyn Monroe have in common? If you guessed they all had bipolar disorder, you’re right.

Cyberstalking: The Fastest Growing Crime

The shift to living virtually has happened so quickly and so pervasively that we have hardly had time to adjust to all the implications. Cyberstalking is a compulsion. It aims to humiliate, control, frighten, manipulate, embarrass, get revenge at, or otherwise harm the victim.

Finding Meaning in Work

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 10, 2015 in The Prime of Life
How can we find significance and purpose in work in today's economy?

9 Ways Some People Will Take Advantage of You

Have you been emotionally ambushed by a coercive friend, coworker, or family member?

Why Do All the Bad Boys Come in Such Beautiful Packages?

By breaking social norms and acting in unpredictable ways, bad boys inspire fascination in us. Bad equals attractive, because distortions and deformities to normal behavior produce a sense of thrill, something that is easily confused with being in love.

Card Drives

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in In Excess
A number of years ago, I helped a leading Internet poker company do some research on different types of poker player and developed a typology. The typology was based on a survey of 2000 poker players and produced seven different types of player. But what were they? Find out more by reading this article.

Our Evolving Black American Naming Traditions

Understanding the meaning and origin of names provides important social clues, spiritual insight, and understanding.

12 Ways to Spot a Misogynist

The misogynists. You may have heard of them. But what you may not know is that they can be anywhere around you. They are notoriously hard to spot. They do not come with a label attached to them, and they may even come across as woman lovers.

Why We Care that Brian Williams Lied

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on February 08, 2015 in Good Thinking
News media wield tremendous power to influence policy and hence history. And for that reason, news anchors can't just be pretty faces, charismatic celebrities, or entertainers.

How to succeed at work

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on February 07, 2015 in A Sideways View
How can you be really savvy at work? What advice would you give to someone just starting a job

de·tach·ment

A person becomes detached from a hut only when they are able to move into a mansion.

Calmfidence: The Secret to True Resilience

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on February 02, 2015 in Ambigamy
Make the best of your worst-case scenarios.

Student Evaluations: Fudging the "Happy Sheets"

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on January 31, 2015 in A Sideways View
One way to see how good, or popular, a training or lecture course is, is to look at the evaluations of those who have been on the course. It is a form of customer satisfaction. These are becoming more important for the way courses are financed and therefore those who deliver them are eager to find ways to increase their positive ratings. What do the cynics suggest?