All About Caregiving

In a 2004 national survey, the AARP found that 44.4 million Americans are providing unpaid care to an adult, and the estimated annual value is $257 billion. To do so is a beautiful act of love and devotion, but also a great drain on one's physical and psychological resources.

Recent posts on Caregiving

Making Better Medical Decisions

By Haider Warraich M.D. on September 26, 2016 in On Modern Medicine
Modern healthcare can come with a dizzying array of options, many of which could mean different destinations.

Who Looks After You?

By Mark O'Connell L.C.S.W.- R. on September 25, 2016 in Quite Queerly
Psychotherapy offers relational support that is crucial to our emotional wellbeing, no matter who or how old we are.

Get the Red Out

Redness of the skin concerns people, but may lead patients to find causes that weren't involved or stop treaments that were actually working.

Sibling Conflict and Gender

By Roberta Satow Ph.D. on September 22, 2016 in Life After 50
Are your siblings sharing the burden of caring for Mom?

What We Know About Aging Americans and Their Caregivers

As the U.S. population ages, older adults are less likely to live in poverty, but more likely to require care.

7 Reasons Every New Parent Should Read Welcome to the Club

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on September 20, 2016 in The Squeaky Wheel
Raquel D'Apice's new baby milestone book 'Welcome to the club' will not only entertain new parents it will be therapeutic for them. Here’s why:

What I Wouldn’t Change If My Health Were Restored Tomorrow

By Toni Bernhard J.D. on September 19, 2016 in Turning Straw Into Gold
I’ve lived with chronic pain and illness for over 15 years. This is the first of two pieces on the subject of what I would and what I would not change should I regain my health.

Age as a Factor in Sexual Orientation and Attraction

By Loren A. Olson M.D. on September 13, 2016 in Finally Out
Sexuality research focusing exclusively on genital sex to the exclusion of attraction, affection and affiliation falls short in our understanding of sexual orientation or identity.

Feminism Is Good for Your Heart

By Karlyn Crowley Ph.D. on September 08, 2016 in Woman Power
Women are dying from broken hearts because systems are broken not because women themselves aren’t doing enough. We need feminism to help us diagnose the problem.

Protective Features Curb Abuse in Polyamorous Relationships

This blog explores the protective features that can inhibit abuse in polyamorous families like the presence of an observer, outside perspectives, allies, and more resources.

Watching A Bird Die

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on September 03, 2016 in Listen Up!
Many of us avoid the topic of dying. Spending some time with death can deepen our engagement with life.

What Determines Our Longevity?

Understanding the determinants of our longevity will help us understand where to place our attention.

A Is For Aunt

By Susan Hooper on August 28, 2016 in Detours and Tangents
Since 2003, I have lived four miles away from my two nephews. During that time, they grew from boys to young men—and they transformed my life.
Photo by Kristin Meekhof

5 Things Care Givers Want Hospice Workers to Know

Hospice care giving is especially difficult because of these 5 things

Caregiving

By Roberta Satow Ph.D. on August 23, 2016 in Life After 50
Is taking care of an elderly parent making you feel guilty no matter how much you do?

Desperately Seeking a False Sense of Security

It is the awareness of the most mundane threats to our hearts that irrelationship most effectively protects us from—how emotionally close we are to those in our everyday lives.

Alison Gopnik’s Advice to Parents: Stop Parenting!

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in Freedom to Learn
Everything Professor Gopnik says in The Gardener and the Carpenter indicates that our schooling system is very very wrong. So why does she point her finger at parents, not schools?

Letter to Young Activists

This post is adapted from a talk recently given to young community organizers about self-care and well-being on the journey to a more compassionate and just society.

Helping a Friend Whose Loved One Is Seriously Ill

How can you best help your friend during a very stressful time? Your greatest gift can be providing support in ways tailored to what your friend needs.

How Could They Have Said That?

Sometimes condolences can hurt more than help.

What to Do When Your Parent-Caregiver Is a Narcissist

I wanted to interview Meredith again so I could get some pointers on how the chronically ill can effectively deal with a parent-caregiver who is self-absorbed and manipulative.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John, labeled for reuse Wikimedia commons

Why Attachment Theory Is All Sizzle and No Steak

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on August 10, 2016 in Standard Deviations
Attachment theory is a helpful research tool, but in clinical practice it imposes arbitrary, moralistic societal standards on relational and sexual desires.

An Out-of-Sync Friendship

A woman laments the loss of a long-time friend when their circumstances change.

5 Ways for Parents to Prevent Back-to-School Meltdowns

Prevent the back-to-school transition from becoming a trip to crazy town.

What Trump Doesn't Know That Any Commander in Chief Should

By Nancy Sherman Ph.D. on August 04, 2016 in Afterwar
Military families go to war vicariously with their service member and the grief and moral injury are the hidden casualties of war. Any future commander in chief should know this.

Your Relationship’s Personality

What is a relationship's personality, and how does it protect itself? Defect and defense can be seen as interchangeable terms—both pinpointing the existence of irrelationship.

Why Is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Still a Mystery?

After fifteen plus years of suffering from this illness with little relief from symptoms, I often feel forgotten by the medical community.

If We Only Had a Brain: Participate in a Clinical Trial

By Greg O'Brien on July 26, 2016 in On Pluto
Just a few keyboard swipes could put the U.S. on the road to triumph over Alzheimer’s. If you're experiencing memory loss that disrupts your daily life, seek help. Take the test.

Want To Save Yourself Years Of Heartache?

Dysregulated relationships have a hard time surviving the transition from the passion of the honeymoon period into a mature, profound, and sustainable commitment to reciprocity.

Happy Parents, Happy Kids

Peace activist Daisaku Ikeda affirms: when happiness thrives in the lives of parents, it thrives in their children’s lives as well.