All About Caregiving

In a 2004 national survey, the AARP found that 44.4 million Americans are providing unpaid care to an adult, and the estimated annual value is $257 billion. To do so is a beautiful act of love and devotion, but also a great drain on one's physical and psychological resources.

Recent posts on Caregiving

Happy Parents, Happy Kids

When happiness thrives in the lives of parents, it naturally thrives in their children’s lives as well.

Is Serving Others the Key to Meaning and Purpose?

Are you going through the motions day after day without feeling fulfilled, and tired of not having a sense of meaning and purpose in your life? Serving others might be the answer!

Smartphones vs. "Smart Parenting" - Part Two

Do you soothe or comfort your child with a digital smartphone or tablet? Here's what you can do instead, and how you can limit your child's use on a digital device.

Can Animals Be Holy?

A new book makes us question the sacred, the human and the future of our world.

Smartphones vs. "Smart Parenting" Part One

There is something fundamentally wrong when a child's greatest source of comfort is their parent’s smartphone.

5 Keys to Providing Quality Dementia Care at Home

Quality dementia care is the source of my mother's contentment and having a team of caregivers is key to my father's very survival. Here's how we've created our pleasant journey.

7 Pet Peeves About Doctors

Unless studies show that there’s no connection between a medication and a particular side-effect, the doctor should be saying, “We don’t know.”

Sex as Relationship Builder or Deal Breaker

Sex can be used to build intimacy. But when a relationship is in trouble, sex can be used just as easily to maintain distance. In that case, sex stops being about sex.

When Sharing Is Not Such a Good Idea

By Mark Borigini M.D. on June 29, 2016 in Overcoming Pain
If only someone could take back the real Original Sin: the lack of common sense.
K. Ramsland

“Hero” Serial Killers

In the news recently was a male nurse who claims he endangered and killed so many patients he'd lost count; he had wanted to be a hero.

Why Time-Outs Need a Time Out

In using time-outs parents unintentionally convey that they are unable to contain or tolerate their own feelings.

It Didn't Start With You: The Mystery of Inherited Trauma

By Mark Matousek on June 23, 2016 in Ethical Wisdom
How do we inherit family traumas? What tools can we use to work with painful experiences that did not begin with us? Family Constellations pioneer Mark Wolynn explains.

A Psychological Approach to Making America Great

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on June 21, 2016 in How To Do Life
What a Psychology Party's platform might look like.

The Caregiver's Spouse

A fiction author gets the real-world details—fantasies, realities, and so much more—right.

Turning the Microscope on Feelings

Why do we tend to overlook the importance of feelings in understanding the behavior of human beings?

Random Acts of Kindness Can Be Dangerous

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 13, 2016 in Ambigamy
To maximize your capacity for empathy and compassion, don't automatically move toward charity.

Helping Child Victims of Sexual Abuse

How to help children with obesity who have been sexually abused? Let them know there is an end to their long journey towards health, safety, and happiness.

The Power of Giving - in Action

There is nothing so valuable as having what we offer to others taken, made use of, and experienced as having value and being useful and helpful. Irrelationship blocks this.
Free/Pixibay

When Children Question Why They Are Eating Animals

Are children inherently vegetarian? When children refuse to eat animals.

What If Only I Am Ready/Willing To Work On Our Relationship?

When bottoming-out in irrelationship, it can be a painful moment fraught with terrifying insights into how wrong so much of what previously felt right about the relationship is.
Bigstock.com

For the Families: Notes on the Subtle Art of Listening

By Susan Noonan MD on May 29, 2016 in View From the Mist
Feeling lost on what you can say or do to help your loved one who has depression? Here are some tips to get you started…

Learning to Relate

Learning how to relate is extremely complex—more so when, very early in life, a child’s parents aren’t effective caregivers.

Who Pays for Mental Illness?

Estimated costs of schizophrenia in the U.S. were $155 billion in 2013. Only 1/4 of costs were for health care for the mentally ill. What accounts for the remaining $117 billion?

15 Tips from 15 Years Sick

There’s been one constant in my life since I began writing for Psychology Today five years ago: chronic illness. Because 10 + 5 = 15, it’s time for “15 Tips from 15 Years Sick.”

5 Ways to Help Kids After a Disaster

As natural disasters like the wildfires in Fort McMurray increase in frequency, there are 5 simple things we can do to help children avoid the trauma of being forcibly displaced.

Focus on Older Adults: May is Mental Health Awareness Month

May 16 - 22 is Older Adult Mental Health Week. Depression, elder abuse and substance abuse/addiction are compromising the health and well-being of our older adult population.

The Caregiver's Manifesto

How many patients have I known over the years who've found themselves caught in the quicksand that is caring for a chronically ill loved one? Too many to count, so I'll recount

Why Rainy Days and Mondays Always Get You Down

Economist Heather Boushey demonstrates that paid sick days, family and medical leave, and child care can empower and support workers - and are also good for the American economy.

If Your Mother Was Grieving, Could You Become Her Caretaker?

What would you do if you suddenly found that you had to care for a depressed and grieving parent?

The Gift of Listening to Our Mothers

We may think we our doing our mothers a favor by listening to them, but the gift is ours.