All About Caregiving

In a 2004 national survey, the AARP found that 44.4 million Americans are providing unpaid care to an adult, and the estimated annual value is $257 billion. To do so is a beautiful act of love and devotion, but also a great drain on one's physical and psychological resources.

Recent Posts on Caregiving

Meaningfully Salient Parenting

Meaningfully salient parenting can be spoken about, but, in essence, is a deeply heartfelt and intimate engagement between parent and child, mother and father, and all within the family system.

The Gold Standard for Healing the World...

Remember an incident when someone listened deeply to you and then talked with you when you were in a bad place. Would you want to honor that person if you could? If so, they would just want you to do onto someone else what they did onto you. Isn't that so?

Reframing Parent-Child Time Can Reduce Stress

Mentally reframing how you think about parent-child time can lessen stress and help you better appreciate the time you spend with your child.

Mental Illness On Reality TV: Helpful Or Harmful?

By Seth Meyers Psy.D. on April 12, 2015 in Insight Is 20/20
A new TV show begs a very basic question: Does showing the intensely emotional moments of untreated mentally ill individuals help or harm the overall cause?

Asian Parenting

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 11, 2015 in Minority Report
Asian parents are often very attuned to taking care of their children's physical needs (i.e. food, shelter, finances for education) yet the emotional support can be lacking. Here's what parents can do to be more attuned to their children's overall health.

Are Women More Emotional Than Men?

Is There Evidence of Women’s Greater Negative Emotionality All Around the World?

The Making of a Murderer

From poverty to riches, serial killers to gang members, behind almost every violent person, there is a story of despair. Not every trauma creates a killer, but most killers are created from trauma.

Ambushed by Eldercare? You’re Not Alone

How to handle the multiple challenges of eldercare.

Lessening Alzheimer’s Discordance: Five Recommendations

Dealing with the differing views of the illness held by the person with Alzheimer's disease and the care partner is a challenging but critical task. Lessening this discordance enormously reduces care partner stress, and is valuable for the person with the disease, as well.

Biased? Yes, against the tide and FOR baby’s needs

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on April 05, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
Someone recently remarked that I was biased... Yes, I am biased FOR babies. I am out of sync with biases that lead people to think letting babies scream is a good thing. Not!

Protective Parenting an Adolescent

With all the media attention devoted to adolescents getting in trouble, getting hurt, and getting killed, it's hard for parents not to worry about their teenager and to act restrictively in her or her defense. However, the best protection parents can provide is self-management preparation for safely functioning in a hazardous world.

The Suicide-Mass Murder Connection: A Growing Epidemic

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in Wicked Deeds
Negative and alienating social forces have made suicide the new murder as frustrated and fearful Americans turn their anger onto themselves and take their own lives in unprecedented numbers. These same social forces also explain the sharp rise in mass public shootings as fatalistic individuals increasingly kill themselves and others in catastrophic acts of violent rage.

“Having Guts” to Harden Parents’ Hearts

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
“Do you have the guts? You’re chicken if you don’t!” Remember such taunts to do stupid things in childhood? Apparently they are common in adulthood too—most recently with a doctor advising new parents. Destructive and unethical, let’s take a look.

What do Children Think about Love?

A group of over thirty preschoolers and kindergarteners were asked what they thought of the word “love.” While younger children were primarily focused on an external conceptual line of thinking, the older children had moved to one that was more internally based.

Changing the ‘No Casserole’ Response to Mental Illness

A mother of two who is active in the International Bipolar Foundation shared a story the other day. When her youngest daughter was diagnosed with diabetes, friends called, sent cards and flowers, brought food, and posted encouraging Facebook messages.

Humiliation, Recovery and Monica Lewinsky

By Carrie Barron M.D. on March 27, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
Public shaming, online harassment and cyber-bullying are ubiquitous but they were not always. This blog examines the heart wrenching plight of one woman and how she overcame humiliation to become a tour-de-force and an agent for public good.

Anorexia and the Dangers of Blog Post Titles

By Emily T. Troscianko on March 26, 2015 in A Hunger Artist
Few topics induce stronger emotion than parenting and children’s illness, and where emotions are heightened miscommunication can easily occur. Here I try to clarify my mother’s original argument, respond to some readers’ comments which blur the crucial distinction between personal and scientific ‘findings’, and reflect on the role of choice in recovery from anorexia.

Falls End Lives; Good Balance Saves Them

By Allen J Frances M.D. on March 24, 2015 in DSM5 in Distress
Falling is a major cause of disability and death. Physical exercise and specific balance tasks greatly reduce the risks. People who don't change their behavior to prevent falls are almost sure to have them.

How Drug Addiction Impacts Infant Care

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in The Me in We
Drug abuse short circuits neural connections between child and caregiver.

Rescue the Mangroves, Rescue Ourselves?

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in Listen Up!
A small, dirt-road fishing village on the Pacific coast of Mexico organizes to restore their threatened ocean environment and provides hope for all of us. They remind us of the powerful hunger to take care of the natural world and "our animal relatives."

Four Years Out: My Favorite “Turning Straw Into Gold" Pieces

My personal favorites cover a broad range of subjects and are spread evenly across the four years. I invite you to browse through the list and read (or re-read) those that spark your interest.

Adolescent Excellence and Managing High Expectations

When parents either support or encourage their teenager to have high personal performance expectations, they also need to provide guidance about how to manage their feelings when these outcomes are not met, as will sometimes occur.

Prenatal Drug Exposure and Disruption of Attachment

By Ira J. Chasnoff M.D. on March 20, 2015 in Aristotle's Child
For successful attachment between caregiver and infant to occur, the caregiver must be able to read and respond to the infant's cues and the infant must be able to read and respond to the caregiver's cues.

Why Parents of Chronically Ill Children Deserve Respect

By Seth Meyers Psy.D. on March 19, 2015 in Insight Is 20/20
Most of us have no idea about the challenges parents of chronically ill children face. Seeing your child in pain takes a toll, so the rest of us must do our part and recognize their unique parenting experience and contribution.

Children Who Kill Are Often Victims Too

Children who murder have often been severely abused or neglected and have experienced a tumultuous home life

How to Change Your Attachment Style

Although in childhood you may have learned habits of insecure attachment, it may be possible for you to override them with effort as an adult.

5 Ways to Motivate and Encourage Seniors

Caring for, and having successful relationships with older adults often require unique interpersonal skills and strategies.

Are You Too Clingy? Is Your Partner?

By Peg Streep on March 11, 2015 in Tech Support
Our childhood experiences can influence us in our day-to-day adult lives, especially in the arena of intimate relationships. Are you able to find the balance between being yourself and part of a dyad? If not, you should probably read this...

5 Must-Ask Questions When Your Doctor Prescribes Painkillers

So what’s a patient to do when they’re on the receiving end of an opioid painkiller prescription? Talk. It may not feel natural to question your caregiver—they are the one with the medical degree after all—but healthy skepticism is in order when opioids are recommended.