All About Caregiving

A 2015 report by the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP found that 43.5 million Americans are providing unpaid care for an adult or child. Caregiving may involve shopping, housekeeping, providing transportation, feeding, bathing, toilet assistance, dressing, walking, coordinating appointments and financial management. To provide unpaid care is a beautiful act of love and devotion, but also a great drain on one's physical and psychological resources.

Recent posts on Caregiving

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Making Better Bureaucrats

By Glenn C. Altschuler Ph.D. on November 15, 2017 in This Is America
Often deemed rule-obsessed, callous, petty, power-trippers, bureaucrats strive to satisfy the impossible expectations we have of them. They deserve our respect.

The Art of Parenting

You have more time to be a good parent today than you will ever have again. Take advantage of your good fortune!

Your Primal Wound: What Happened in Childhood?

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on November 12, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
Psychosynthesis considers a human life to move toward self-realization but many get detoured by their primal woundedness. How does that happen?

Who Cares for the Caregivers?

It's another labor of love.

Memory Ability Declines After Age 20

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on November 07, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
Wondering if your memory is normal or not? We’ll help you understand what’s normal, what’s not, and what to do about it.

The Life of the Alienated Parent

Coping with the emotional trauma created by the experience of attachment-based parental alienation.

Train the Mind and Grow Happier

By Nicole F. Bernier, Ph.D. on November 04, 2017 in Ripening With Time
How you can overcome negativity, particularly as you age.

When Your Parent Has Dementia

Baby Boomers often remark that while their parents “did everything for them,” there was not a lot of space for emotional topics.

Fathering in the Quiet Moments

How can fathers create meaningful relationships with their children? A few simple tasks can go a long way.
dolgachov/CanStockPhoto

Good Citizens Needed to Support People With Mental Illness

By David Susman, Ph.D. on October 16, 2017 in The Recovery Coach
Want to make a difference in the lives of those with mental illness? Here are several easy options to consider.

Bigfoot Parents Have Small Brains

By Robert D. Martin Ph.D. on October 12, 2017 in How We Do It
Birds and mammals mostly show intensive parenting, linked to their “warm-blooded” nature and quite large brains. Incubator birds show no care of their chicks and have tiny brains.

Nonparental Daycare: What The Research Tells Us

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on October 05, 2017 in Insight Therapy
Most American children will experience nonparental care. America has yet to adequately address the implications of this reality.
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When "Never Mind" Is an Insult

By Shari Eberts on October 05, 2017 in Life With Hearing Loss
Don't say these two words to someone with hearing loss.

Whose Job Is It Anyway?

By Elly Vintiadis Ph.D. on October 04, 2017 in Minding the Mind
We all have an ethical responsibility to fight stigma, but mental health professionals have a bit more.

Thank You, Child Welfare First Responders!

By Michael W Corrigan Ed.D. on September 28, 2017 in Kids Being Kids
In child welfare, every day is similar to experiencing a hurricane. For the dedicated workforce serving our nation’s most vulnerable... this one's for you!

Prodependence: Moving Beyond Codependency

Can we please stop pathologizing the desire to love and help?
Stocksnap Creative Commons/Used with Permission

The Emotional Impact of a Nanny's Leaving

A nanny's departure can affect the whole family.

12 Comments That Would Be Welcomed by the Chronically Ill

By Toni Bernhard J.D. on September 12, 2017 in Turning Straw Into Gold
Most people have the best of intentions when speaking to those who struggle with their health. That said, often remarks by friends and family are off the mark.

Opioid Addiction: Is This a War We Can Win?

Those who are familiar with “recovery from addiction” know that solving the crisis requires action. The battle lines are clear; it’s time to take a stand.

Let's Eliminate Physical Restraints in Group Homes

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on September 06, 2017 in Talking About Trauma
Physical restraints place children and youth at serious risk.

Six Ways to Be More Supportive to Those Closest to You

When the people you care about the most are in need of support, are you ready to be there for them? Based on new research, these 6 tips will help you help them.

Loneliness Poses Greater Public Health Threat Than Obesity

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on August 23, 2017 in The Squeaky Wheel
The loneliness epidemic is growing and becoming more costly by the day. But there is something you can do about it.

Things to Do When You’re Mostly Housebound

I’ve had over sixteen years to adjust to being at home most of the time. Here seven ideas for living a purposeful and fulfilling life even if you’re stuck at home.

How to Mindfully Parent in Real Life

By Yael Schonbrun Ph.D. on August 07, 2017 in Moderating
How mindfulness can help get you through the tough parenting moments.

Are Dogs Getting Cuter?

Dogs that fit Lorenz's 'Kindchenschema' are becoming ever more popular, but at great cost to their welfare.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Caring and Caregiving

Providing care to a loved one who is dependent, fragile, or in need shows love in a basic way. Those who give with generosity and reliability rewards themselves as well as others.

7 Keys to Coping with a Loved One’s Serious Illness

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 05, 2017 in How To Do Life
An interview with a psychologist whose wife has cancer and is recovering from a stroke.

Working Conditions for Providers Affects Patient Health

Being flexible as employees meet their family needs is good for the health and well-being of workers. If those workers are healthcare providers, patients benefit also.

Identifying Challenges Effecting Veteran Mental Healthcare

Why are veterans continuing to struggle?
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From the Cradle to the Grave, Looking Back

By Greg O'Brien on July 28, 2017 in On Pluto
“As I watched my wife of 66 years begin to deteriorate with dementia, it was the first serious trauma I had faced since losing my parents."