Making the Most Out of Your Career

We spend many of our waking hours at work, so we better love what we do. So how can you work more joyfully, not to mention more intelligently and quickly? Finding your creative flow and sparking innovative juices is important, as is pulling together in team spirit. 

Of course, for some individuals–those who suffer from conditions like acute stress disorder, for instance–careers are affected by issues beyond normal behavior. 

Recent Posts on Career

Why Your Creative Friends and Co-Workers Can Be So Deceptive

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in Social Instincts
New research explores the connection between creativity and unethical behavior.

Serving Your Self-Interest For Good

By Kathy Cramer Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in Lead Positive
Find out from renowned women's success coach why navigating the politics of an organization is critical to getting promoted.

Addressing the Fear of Becoming Irrelevant

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in How To Do Life
A worry that's common among older people.

Ann Rule: The Last Interview

By Cathy Scott on July 28, 2015 in Crime, She Writes
Fact-based crime writer, dead at 83, told it like it was.

Should You Take a Gap Year Before Grad School?

The Data Doctor answers a question about the pros and cons of a "gap" year between undergrad and grad school.

Stories of Seclusion: Afraid He'd Lose His Temper, He Hid

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 28, 2015 in How To Do Life
Injustice, especially if it could cost your livelihood, can cause great anger.

Are You Fully Charged? 5 Ways to Energize Your Work & Life

A survey of 10,000 people revealed that only 11% responded "yes" when asked, "Did you have a great deal of energy yesterday?"

The Best Place to Be Is Together

A sense of peace and relaxation is the largest benefit from a vacation according to experts. Five guidelines help you return relaxed and happy.

Is the Taboo Against “Blaming Victims” Over?

By Izzy Kalman on July 27, 2015 in Resilience to Bullying
The politically correct anti-bullying academic anti-bullying field has been shunning approaches to bullying that focus on teaching victims how to solve their problems because they don't want to be accused of "blaming victims." Researchers, discovering that the bully-focused approach doesn't work, may finally be ignoring the taboo against blaming victims.

8 Ways to Bust Your Creative Blocks at Work

By Megan Dalla-Camina on July 26, 2015 in Real Women
Creativity at work can be stifled, especially during really busy or stressful times. Try these strategies to bust your blocks and get your creative juices flowing.

Heroin Abuse is on our Doorstep

Of course, I see it every day because I work in the addiction treatment field, but increasingly, families that never thought they’d be touched by substance abuse or addiction are having just that experience.

Stories of Seclusion: An Immigrant Shocked at Her Workplace

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 25, 2015 in How To Do Life
How a too laid-back workplace drove a woman into isolation.

It’s Time For Our Culture Of Overwork To Be Over

By Tim Leberecht on July 24, 2015 in The Romance of Work
We may talk a good game about how we want to achieve the ever-elusive work/life balance—but what do we do about it? How many of us approach it with the kind of profound urgency that marks the conundrums we attempt to solve at work? I had the chance recently to sit down with Brigid Schulte, author of "Overwhelmed: How to Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time."

Millennials: How Gen Y Will Lead Us Into the Future

By Ray Williams on July 24, 2015 in Wired for Success
The next generation of leaders, Gen Y or Millennials, have vastly different expectations for leaders and how they want to be trained as future leaders.

Should We Work Harder?

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 in Hidden Motives
In America, we tend to think that success is all about individual effort. And recently Jeb Bush reinforced that idea in suggesting that our economy could be more robust if each of us worked harder.

Severe Migraine: Finding Answers in the Mind, Not in Pills

There are 45 million Americans with migraine and about 10% of those have frequent and severe headaches that are unresponsive to medications and other treatments. Most doctors would describe migraine as a genetic disorder, however this blog presents a different view. A patient with severe migraines is presented and her cure lay in her willingness to reappraise her life.

Do You Want More Respect and Recognition for Your Work?

By Allison Carmen on July 23, 2015 in The Gift of Maybe
The desire for appreciation and respect from others often stems from a fear that things are not all right. We are afraid that we're not who we should be or we're not accomplishing enough with our lives. Yet the trap is that we can’t always get from others what we are looking for and must look within in order to find any semblance of stability and freedom.

Why Lisa Lampanelli is a ‘Spiritual Gangster’

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 23, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Lisa Lampanelli shares how helping others can help develop a strong self-concept.

Does Your Prospective Boss's Personality Suit You?

Compatibility with your prospective boss is the one factor that will likely have the most profound impact on job satisfaction, and maybe your career. Yet it’s remarkably neglected in the job interview. It's the elephant in the room that not enough job seekers dare to uncover. If you ask the right questions, however, you'll greatly increase your odds of success.

The Missing Link in Personal Growth

By Gregg Levoy on July 20, 2015 in Passion!
Real passion has real staying power. It's not just about exuberance, but stamina. Here's an inside look at the precious commodity of patience, and the role it plays in our unfoldment.

The “Trump Effect” in the Workplace

There are so many excuses for stupid or harassing behavior in the office.

Finding a New Job After 40

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on July 20, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Employment statistics show that the length of time spent being unemployed has tripled for workers over the age of fifty-five. Whether due to outdated job skills or age-related bias, older job seekers often find themselves being forced to drop out of the work force completely or taking jobs paying far less than what they once earned.

Career Advice for Geniuses

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 20, 2015 in How To Do Life
Career advice for brilliant people is often different from standard counsel.

Career Development for the Gifted

The broad range of talents and interests found in gifted individuals makes the career decision-making process complex.

What Pixar’s 'Inside Out' Tells Us About How We Work

By Aaron Hurst on July 16, 2015 in The Purpose Economy
Pixar’s new movie Inside Out explains the vital role we have as parents and educators in setting our kids up for success in their lives -- and their future careers.

No-Face Day in the Cheery Workplace

Modern workplaces expect workers to be happy, and are developing ever-more sophisticated tools for making sure that employees are positive, engaged, and productive. But one Chinese company's "No-Face Day," in which employees were allowed to wear masks that excused them from the demand to be happy, suggests just how exhausting-- and unnecessary-- this can be.

By Neglecting Spatial People, What Innovations Have We Lost?

Peter Thiel famously said of the future: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” As innovative as Twitter might be, it pales in comparison to engineering feats that could truly transform our future. And by neglecting spatially talented people, we may have already lost so many incredible inventions.

A Debate: Should You Be Optimistic About Work?

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 15, 2015 in How To Do Life
Looking at the big picture can help you make better career decisions.

Stories of Seclusion: A Doctor Who Has Seen Too Much

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 14, 2015 in How To Do Life
It is not easy being a physician these days, especially an oncologist.