What Is Behaviorism?

Behaviorism seeks to identify observable, measurable laws that could explain all of human behavior. Although psychology now pays more attention to the inner landscape of emotions and thought, behaviorism has had a durable influence on everything from animal training to parenting techniques to the bonuses financial managers receive.

Recent Posts on Behaviorism

What Is Your Problem, Baltimore?

By Kathryn Seifert on May 04, 2015 in Stop The Cycle
What Is Your Problem, Baltimore? Racism, Lack of Economic Opportunity, Community Engagement, or Something Else?

Getting to the Goal

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on April 29, 2015 in The Dolphin Divide
How focusing on the positive helps us overcome obstacles. What we want is often more powerful than what we fear. But if we’re not careful in how we frame our goals, we may be setting ourselves up for disappointment—and inadvertently turn our fears into reality.

Do You Have the Personality of a Neanderthal?

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Almost all of us have some Neanderthal in us. What can that tell us about how these ancient cousins of ours thought?

Encouraging the Best From Your Child

Parents have so many worries, but by instituting some proactive strategies for positive reinforcement they may be able to affect healthy outcomes in their children.

Medical Model? Recovery Model? No Problem

By Stephen Seager M.D. on April 20, 2015 in BrainTalk
Regarding the treatment of serious mental Illness, there is currently a fundamental rift between two camps: the Medical Model and the Recovery Model.

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

What We Choose to Believe - The Power of Belief

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
Why are we more tolerant of our own fallibility than that of machines that operate on probabilities (algorithms)? What does this say about our confidence in science and scientific evidence? Does the entrepreneurial mindset offer a different perspective on how we learn and grow?

Forensic Media Psychology and a Camera in Every Pocket!

Forensic Media Psychology (FMP) is an important sub-specialty in psychology offering increasing professional opportunity. Present applications include law, public policy, government, health care, entertainment, education, commerce, the military, social justice, and more. Citizen video and a camera in every pocket is causing a cultural reset.

Evidence? We Don't Need No Stinkin' Evidence!

By Alfie Kohn on April 07, 2015 in The Homework Myth
It's possible to prove that rewards and punishments aren't effective in the long run. But what if defenses of these practices are rooted more in ideology than psychology?

How to Deal with Angry Employees

By Kerry Patterson on April 06, 2015 in Crucial Conversations
In today’s “enlightened” organizations it’s generally considered uncouth to blow a gasket at work, so today’s version of work-place anger often comes in the form of repressed rage masked as raging sarcasm, or possibly a hostile glance, or maybe the ever-favorite thinly veiled threat.

8 Signs You're in a Relationship with a Sexual Narcissist

Sexual narcissism can be defined as a grandiose sense of one’s sexual prowess which, in the mind of the sexual narcissist, entitles him or her to engage in acts of emotional and physical manipulation at the partner’s expense. How do you know when your partner may be a sexual narcissist? Here are eight telltale signs...

What Happened to the Wonder of Learning?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 03, 2015 in Memory Medic
What is school doing to your child?

The Fake Sanity Clause*

By Hal Mathew on April 03, 2015 in Unagoraphobic
If you can look this content you can feel this content

How to Apply Spring Cleaning to Your Body, Mind and Soul

By Gregg McBride on March 28, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
What are you sitting on, keeping in your home or potentially hoarding on your shelves that might be holding you back mentally? Anything you need to get rid of? Any de-cluttering you need encouragement on? You might be surprised to learn that your mind is in need of spring cleaning even more than your living space is.

Violent Expression: Sign of Our Deep Need to Communicate?

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on March 26, 2015 in The Dolphin Divide
When notions of fair play are violated, our ability to speak helps keep the peace. We are capable of sudden, violent physical outbursts, but calm expressions of anger through language can keep us from resorting to brute force – sometimes.

5 of the Oddest-Ever Psychology Experiments

Over the years, psychologists have come up with some ingenious experiments in an effort to study human behavior. Here are some of the oddest psychological studies ever conducted.

4 Reasons Kids Stop Respecting Their Parents

Just telling kids their behavior is not okay is not enough

Cold Hearts or Broken Brains?

I remember the very first feeling I had, was my heart pounding. I mean really pounding. The second feeling I had was that my hands were sweating. And the third feeling was fear, and the kind of reality set in that there was a murderer in front of me.

Treating William Shakespeare

Asking which of the things I did that worked and which didn’t is exactly the same as asking which things the patient does in response I should feel rewarded by.

3 Major Warning Signs of Relationship Trouble

Most of us want to meet and settle down with the “right” person, and most of us want such a relationship to last. Yet, 53% of marriages in the U.S., 48% in Canada, 47% in the U.K., and 43% in Australia end in divorce. What are some of the major warning signs of a relationship in trouble? Here are three key indicators based on research...

Simple Life Hacks to Lose Weight and Improve Your Health

By David DiSalvo on February 24, 2015 in Neuronarrative
Much of the self-improvement industry is focused on ways to cattle prod our willpower into healthier habits. Behavioral psychologists, on the other hand, have conducted a wealth of research showing that skillful hacks to our homes and offices can produce results that tweaks to willpower, however forceful, rarely make stick.

Learning to Enjoy Life by Watching Dogs

Research shows us that owning a dog can lead to a healthier lifestyle. Dog lovers know that dogs teach ways of living that we might want to emulate. Watching your canine friend—or someone else’s—and imitate some of their behaviors. This can be your guide to improving moods and learning to enjoy life more.

Make Time for the Pain

By Leon F Seltzer Ph.D. on February 06, 2015 in Evolution of the Self
When someone comes into therapy essentially requesting a major mental and emotional overhaul, I typically warn them that we’ll be doing a lot of grief work. That is, if we’re to accomplish a major transformation of their self-image, they’ll need to revisit many of the times and places where their painfully felt insecurities and self-doubts originated.

The Psychology of Torture

By Jay Richards Ph.D. on February 04, 2015 in The Violent Mind
Cognitive behavioral theory got it wrong, but how?

Is the Super Bowl Taking a Toll on You?

By Matt Beardmore on January 31, 2015 in Time Out!
Even though the end of the NFL season will result in some people dreading the return to “real-life” responsibilities, others will celebrate the connections they’ve built this season and fully enjoy the Super Bowl experience, no matter who wins or loses.

Applied Behavior Analysis Embraces Genetics

Genetics is now taking its proper place in applied behavioral therapy, but only the imprinted brain theory can provide a paradigm that goes beyond behaviorism to fully integrate genetics, psychology, and psychiatry.

What Alan Turing Gave Psychology

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on December 24, 2013 in Good Thinking
There are many lessons to be learned from Turing’s extraordinary life and accomplishments, not the least of which is that benevolence and genius are too often misunderstood when they occur in those who are different from the majority.

Value Science in a Nutshell Continued

By Leon Pomeroy Ph.D. on December 17, 2013 in Beyond Good and Evil
Discovering moral science beyond good and evil

Value Science in a Nutshell

By Leon Pomeroy Ph.D. on November 29, 2013 in Beyond Good and Evil
Truth is Beauty, if Poet Keats is Right. But, is Truth Goodness?

Responding to “Borderline” Provocations—Part I

By David M. Allen M.D. on November 04, 2013 in A Matter of Personality
Being in a relationship, by blood or romantically, with someone with traits of borderline personality disorder is incredibly challenging. While they may seem irrational, there is in fact a method to their madness. In Part I of this series, I introduce some important considerations before going on to describe in future posts specific countermeasures to their provocations.