Why do we often think we know what we want, only to be disappointed with our purchases and choices? Behavioral economics shows just how irrational humans can be. Here's insight into the surprising ways in which our emotions and thought patterns guide us toward predictable economic decisions.

Recent posts on Behavioral Economics

By Fiona ellis-chadwick (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

10 Factors That Influence Your Purchase Decisions

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on December 09, 2017 in Science of Choice
Consumers are powerfully influenced by their emotions, environmental cues, as well as by how options are presented to them.
123rf  mehta123

Arguing Politics with Friends? One Word Makes a Difference

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on December 09, 2017 in Off the Couch
This little word can change how you approach political conversations with friends, family, and anyone else in your life.

Moral Relativism Is Tricky, but Smarter Than the Alternative

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on December 09, 2017 in Ambigamy
When push comes to shove, we dig in our heels, pretending that nature or the supernatural stands for what we stand for. That's a problem worth keeping an eye on.

The Dangers of Ghosting

By Anna Akbari Ph.D. on December 05, 2017 in Startup Your Life
Put an end to ghosting in your professional and personal life.
Shuttershock

How to Keep Santa from Making Our Kids Gain Weight

By Peter A. Ubel M.D. on December 04, 2017 in Scientocracy
The key to combating America’s obesity problem is to prevent children from developing obesity in the first place.

How Our Personal Finances Can Make Us Happy

By Utpal Dholakia on December 04, 2017 in The Science Behind Behavior
Financial well-being research focuses on security and stress-relief, but not on contentment or joy that we get from money.

Are You In Denial About Your Health?

By David Rosen on December 01, 2017 in Health 2.0
Why do some people needlessly put their health in jeopardy and take unnecessary risks with their well-being?

Rethink Your Way to a Saner Holiday Season

Is your brain overwhelmed by a never-ending holiday checklist? Research shows that rethinking your way to merry and bright should go straight to the top of your list.

Control Freaks and Approval-Holics (Part 2)

By Dale James Dwyer Ph.D. on November 28, 2017 in Got a Minute?
What do you think influences how trustworthy we appear to others or they appear to us?
By Piyush Ikhar (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

7 Common Reasons Why People Use Drugs

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on November 28, 2017 in Science of Choice
Vulnerability to addiction can be explained by considering multilevel factors from the molecular to the societal.

Designing for the Human Brain

By Diogo Gonçalves on November 28, 2017 in There Are Free Lunches
Applying these behavioral principles will allow companies to design for usability and understanding, and to discover a new competitive edge.
iStock 3324930

Six Reasons Why People Give Their Money Away, or Not

By Sara Konrath Ph.D. on November 26, 2017 in The Empathy Gap
Why do people give away their hard-earned money to charity? An economist and a psychologist explain.

Why Does Trump Post on Twitter?

By Fredric Neuman M.D. on November 23, 2017 in Fighting Fear
A psychiatric explanation of why Trump tweets when it is not in his best interest to do so.

A Solution to The Biggest Mystery You've Learned to Ignore

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on November 22, 2017 in Ambigamy
You've probably never thought to ask even though it's the question behind all your big questions: What is trying and how did it start?
Making Causal Judgment

Making Causal Judgment

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on November 21, 2017 in Science of Choice
Causal and counterfactual reasoning inform our judgments of causality.

9 Ways Adult Children Can Avoid Regressing During Holidays

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on November 20, 2017 in Singletons
At what point do you get to be the grown-up? Adult children can change holiday traditions and family plans without reverting back to past mommy-daddy child roles.

Why People Who Have Less Give More

By Utpal Dholakia on November 20, 2017 in The Science Behind Behavior
Every one of us can learn valuable lessons from the generosity and compassion of the poor.

Testamentary Restraints on Marriage

By Ruth Lee Johnson J.D. on November 16, 2017 in So Sue Me
Many parents have a lot to say about their children's love interests and relationship decisions. Some parents want to have the last word, even after they die.

Are More Men “Marrying Up” Today?

Literature is filled with stories of economically disadvantaged women looking to find a mate who was financially able to provide for her; do men do this more often now?

Sexual Variety

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on November 16, 2017 in The Human Beast
There is an astonishing amount of variation in sexual behavior around the globe and over time. Many of these differences can be explained as adaptive responses to the environment.

How Maslow Got Cool

By Lawrence R Samuel Ph.D. on November 14, 2017 in Boomers 3.0
Self-actualization has emerged as a common goal among more psychologically secure baby boomers, and it is something that will become even more prevalent in their third act of life.

The Introvert Restaurant

By Anneli Rufus on November 14, 2017 in Stuck
Most restaurants are designed to attract and delight extroverts. What if some weren't?

Digital Goods Valued Less Than Their Physical Counterparts

By Alain Samson Ph.D. on November 14, 2017 in Consumed
New research shows how much consumers value digital vs physical media.

Predictions for 2018 and Beyond

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on November 13, 2017 in How To Do Life
Long-term trends that people involved in strategic planning should consider.

Is a Little Knowledge Really a Dangerous Thing?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on November 13, 2017 in Media Spotlight
While we may be impressed by people willing to make bold statements (especially at election time), the fact is that, more often than not, overconfidence can be a grave mistake
Hal Sigall

Perceiving the Credibility of Claims of Sexual Abuse

By Harold Sigall Ph.D. on November 12, 2017 in Wishful Thoughts
How did the appearance of Harvey Weinstein and his accusers affect our beliefs about their credibility?

Why Addicts Make Poor Decisions

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on November 06, 2017 in Science of Choice
Decision failures could explain why addicts pursue and consume drugs even in the face of negative consequences.

Why Automating Retirement Savings May Not Be Enough

By Utpal Dholakia on November 06, 2017 in The Science Behind Behavior
Participants in automatic retirement savings plans are saving at rates far less than the recommended percentages.

4 Ways Spending Smarter Can Make You Happier

How do you create a budget that optimizes for happiness? Financial expert, Matt Goren, explains how to do it.

Key Management Skills For the Increasingly "Agile Workforce"

By Victor Lipman on November 01, 2017 in Mind of the Manager
With fewer employees and more freelancers, the character of the workforce is rapidly changing. If communication is king in this increasingly remote environment, clarity is queen.