Why do we often think we know what we want, only to be disappointed with our purchases and choices? Behavioral economics shows just how irrational humans can be. Here's insight into the surprising ways in which our emotions and thought patterns guide us toward predictable economic decisions.

Recent posts on Behavioral Economics

Being "Good in Bed."

By Fredric Neuman M.D. on June 25, 2017 in Fighting Fear
Many men and women worry about not being "good in bed." The advice I give applies to many other sort of personal encounters: a first date, a job interview, or selling something

Will A Robot Take Your Job?

By Dawn R. Norris, Ph.D. on June 23, 2017 in The Next Step
Can you be replaced by technology?

Hating the Elite

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on June 22, 2017 in The Human Beast
Many deride the wealthy elite as symbols of inequality in democratic societies supposedly founded on equality. Why do people hate them so much?

Beliefs: Twelve Myths You'll Be Relieved to Debunk

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 20, 2017 in Ambigamy
Getting realistic about beliefs can go a long way toward peace of mind and better decision-making.
stockfreeimages /14114118/Harbor-at-Sunset purchased on free trial

Globalization and Work: Have We Learned Anything Yet?

Free trade raises GDP but has its losers as well as its winners. It’s time to exchange the “winners could compensate losers” slogan for a “winners must compensate losers” policy.

Why Posted Prices Are Often Meaningless

There’s a significant gap between asked-for prices and what customers actually pay.

Pathological Resistance to Change Does Not Make Us Great

Looking backwards won't make us great. We need innovation to tackle big problems like energy outages and their impact on the elderly. Our collective resilience depends on it.
Sara Canaday

Cognitive Diversity

By Sara Canaday on June 18, 2017 in You (According to Them)
What does the concept of cognitive diversity mean? When leaders surround themselves with people who "constantly validate and reflect their own beliefs," it stifles fresh thinking.

Why It's So Hard to Buy Father's Day Gifts

There's a psychological reason why we're stumped when it comes to what to buy dad for Father's Day. Here's why and three tips.

Judging Your Worth

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on June 12, 2017 in A Swim in Denial
China is developing a digital system to track and evaluate its population of 1.3 billion people. They’re not the only ones.

What Perks and Benefits Do Employees Want Most?

By Victor Lipman on June 10, 2017 in Mind of the Manager
A new survey on summer perks and benefits finds significant mismatches between employee desires and company offerings.

Riding the Next Wave of Human Evolution

With their deep comfort with uncertainty and technology, coupled with their hardwired sense of inclusion, Millennials are blazing the trail by transforming workplaces.

When Distraction Is a Good Thing

By Nir Eyal on June 08, 2017 in Automatic You
Distractions are often seen as a bad thing, but that's not always the case. Here's how you can use distractions to your advantage.

What is the Design Pattern of Engaging Products?

Products we find most engaging have a basic design pattern called a hook, experiences that connect users’ problems to a product with enough frequency to form a habit.

Material Girl, Miserable Girl

By Sarah C. Newcomb Ph.D. on June 06, 2017 in Loaded
People who place a high importance on material wealth report lower quality of life in physical, social, emotional, and professional domains.

The Deep Roots of Left vs. Right

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 05, 2017 in Ambigamy
The fundamental distinction in politics as in life is between constraint and freedom. We need both.

BA CEO Shouldn’t Be Sacked But Should Be Docked Pay

By Chengwei Liu Ph.D. on June 05, 2017 in Decisions Defined
British Airways IT failure caused canceled flights for 75,000 people. To fix the problems, it's CEO shouldn’t be sacked. Rather, he and his executives should be docked pay.

How Food and Energy Led to Polarization in America

By The Research Lab on June 05, 2017 in The Fundamentals
Explanations for this polarization revolve around one thing: Energy consumption. By Carey W. King, Ph.D.
DFID - UK Department for International Development/WikiCommons

Inside the Mind of U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May

The key psychology over the timing of elections is that they reveal information about how well incumbents expect to perform in the future.

How Authoritarians Leaders Get Away with It

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 01, 2017 in Ambigamy
Authoritarian followers for whatever cause and however motivated, treat life as perfectly manageable with machine-like habits of thought.

What is Undisciplined Spending?

It’s a repeated, habitual pattern of three potentially harmful spending behaviors.
Bev Webb, 2012

Sorting Fact From Fiction: Why Expertise Matters

Are you able to utter the three magic words "I don't know"? If not, you could be on your way to making some really bad decisions.

Is It Ever Okay to Lie to Your Lover?

Healthy relationships are built upon a foundation of trust. However, it is surprisingly easy to be deceptive in an intimate relationship. Can you be honest and still be kind?

Being Sweet on Your Fitbit

When your Fitbit becomes part of your identity, you’re on the right path to fitness, weight loss, and eternal bliss.

Behave Yourself: Moral Behavior and Conformity

By Eyal Winter Ph.D. on May 27, 2017 in Feeling Smart
Should we induce our kids to conform?

Costly Curves

By Alain Samson Ph.D. on May 25, 2017 in Consumed
The thin ideal turns big people into big spenders.
Journal of the Association for Consumer Research

Surprise! Nagging Your Spouse to Lose Weight Backfires

By Peter A. Ubel M.D. on May 22, 2017 in Scientocracy
Sometimes the worst way to keep people from engaging in harmful behaviors is to tell them to avoid those behaviors.
Pixabay

A Scientific Perspective For Making Better Decisions

By John Nosta on May 19, 2017 in The Digital Self
While multiple factors must be considered in any decision, the intrinsic stability or instability of a system or scenario can be a powerful tool in guiding decision making.

Why Eating Avocado Toast Can Set You Back Financially

It’s not eating avo-toast that matters so much as what the choice signifies.

Rewarding Exercise with Food: A Novel Approach

Is it wrong to run that extra mile for a slice of guilt-free cake?