Analyzing Attention

Attention is sometimes described as a spotlight that focuses your awareness on a subset of what's going on in your head or in your environment. Some people naturally have more control over the spotlight than others. Control over the spotlight can also vary in certain situations (for instance, when one is free of distractions) and with the aid of certain drugs (like caffeine, Ritalin, and other stimulants). 

Recent posts on Attention

Size Matters

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on September 21, 2017 in Social Lights
Advice for teaching large classes.

The Modern Shrinking of Attention Leads to Social Rancor

By Eric Leuthardt M.D. on September 20, 2017 in Mind Blender
Why is the world becoming so polarized?

I Tried Direct Neurofeedback and the Results Surprised Me

By Zoltan Istvan on September 17, 2017 in The Transhumanist Philosopher
Recently, Grant Rudolph, Clinical Director at Echo Rock Neurotherapy, invited me to try his Direct Neurofeedback techniques.
google Images

Your Two Choices: Presented to You Every Moment of Your Life

Are your habits taking you down the wrong road?

How Procrastinators Get Things Done

When deadlines are not absolute or clearly defined, procrastinators do successfully meet them.
used with permission from Pixabay

Some Stress Can Be Good for You

Put your stress to work for you.

Anti-Mindfulness

By Bence Nanay Ph.D. on September 05, 2017 in Psychology Tomorrow
Mindfulness works – when it does – in spite of its ideology. This explains the worrying finding that mindfulness meditation often leads to panic attacks and depression.

Mindfulness Therapy Could Help ADHD, Studies Suggest

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on August 31, 2017 in Urban Survival
New studies suggest an important role for mindfulness cognitive behavioral therapy in ADHD treatment.

This Is Your Brain on First Grade

By Lydia Denworth on August 30, 2017 in Brain Waves
When kids start grade school, they have to learn to sit still and pay attention. That experience helps them develop better executive functioning.

Voices: Overheard in Psychosis But Underheard in Autism

As predicted by the diametric model, auditory symptoms in psychosis are opposite to those in autism, and both are extensions of normality.

Beating the Post-Summer Office Blues

By Tasha Eurich Ph.D. on August 29, 2017 in The Power of Insight
Are you struggling to get your head back in the game at work now that summer is over? Here are three research-backed tips to make this your most productive fall yet.

Human-Like Consciousness and Human-Like Intelligence

The relationship between human-like qualities and the capacity for consciousness, the H-C plane, gets more complicated with the consciousness and attention dissociation.

Second Wedding Bridal Shower: Pictures from the Past

This is what women look like when we're really laughing, I thought. This was me, and us, all those years ago. This is me, and us, still. What a luxury.
Shutterstock

The Silent Treatment: How Silence Amplifies Your Callings

By Gregg Levoy on August 26, 2017 in Passion!
It’s often in silence that you figure out what you have to say to the world, get a bead on your passions and the source of those passions.

The Hidden Gifts of the Shadow

You may have noticed that the word “shadow” has been showing up with great frequency lately in popular culture and in the media.

Remembering Accidentally on Purpose

It's a well-known, unfortunate fact of life that some of our memory functions decline as we age, but recent studies suggest there may be a silver lining to that gray cloud.

What Makes a Dog Notice a Person

Is it the sight of you, the sounds you make, or your scent that is most likely to make a dog aware that you are nearby?
Eric Maisel

What's More Likely to Increase Creativity—Netflix or Zumba?

Have some folks watch Netflix for an hour. Have some other folks take a Zumba class. Then test their creativity. What do you expect that the results will be? Here's the answer!

Plato, Phones, and That Embarrassing Silence

Is technology a problem? Was it in the past?
Volha_R/Shutterstock

You Really Need to Be Tracking Your Dreams

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on August 01, 2017 in Dream Catcher
Recording and working with your dreams on a regular basis may allow you to better predict your illnesses, cultivate your creativity and improve your daily social interactions.
https://pixabay.com/en/couple-date-fashion-happy-man-1845620/

Where to Go on a First Date? Why Scene Selection Matters

Sparks fly when distraction is low. Selective focus is seductive, so on a first date, set the scene to give your partner your undivided attention.

Untangling Myths About Human Trafficking

With human trafficking being known as 'modern day slavery,' it's imperative that we shatter the commonly-held myths about this criminal act to help better identify and stop it.
freestocks/stocksnap

The Smartphone: Handle With Care

The retreat that technology offers can be a dream come true for introverts--but it can become a nightmare.

The Silver Lining in the ADHD Cloud

Is your ADHD getting in your way? Learn how to turn it into a valuable asset.

Dementia of Youth—Why Our Memories Are So Unreliable

Do you feel a little lost in your life choices? Small mindset shifts can go a long way

Four Reasons Why Paradox Helps Research Get Attention

Do Paradoxes Command Better Attention or Disbelief? The Answer Will Surprise You.

Loneliness and Dis-Connection

Do you pick up your phone t look at the various iterations of Facebook and Twitter when you are with others or feeling somehow lonely? This strategy will only make you more lonely.

The Power of Wakeup Calls

By Gregg Levoy on July 18, 2017 in Passion!
The purpose of wakeup calls is to awaken you to something you're ignoring. Here's how to make the most of them.

The #1 Conversation Topic for a Great First Date

Research reveals that the number-one topic of conversation of a successful first date is the woman.

How "Only Having Eyes" for Your Date Creates Chemistry

Research indicates that when it comes to building chemistry, first-date partners are uniquely attracted to others they believe are uniquely attracted to them.