Analyzing Appetite

If only it were a simple calculus: hungry, eat, full, stop. But an array of biochemicals sending signals to the brain from a variety of local centers and around the body makes appetite very complex. Appetite is malleable in order to take advantage of excess calories whenever they are available, and sometimes it can be difficult to control. 

Recent Posts on Appetite

What Do You Reach For First Thing In The Morning?

By Gregg McBride on May 23, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
What do you feel like you have to have first thing in the morning that might give a nutritionist a panic attack? By paying attention to how you feel (how you really feel), you might just realize these substances aren't what you're craving after all. And as our tastes change, our bodies, minds and health can change—for the better.

The Melancholy of Anatomy: Excessive Weight and Depression

Does a depressive disorder lead to weight gain or does weight gain lead to a depressive disorder? Studies in the past few years seem to indicate a “bidirectional relationship” between excessive weight and depression, with major public health implications.

When Life is Too Sweet

Why does sugar have to be bad for you?

To Weigh or Not to Weigh?

By Emily T. Troscianko on May 14, 2015 in A Hunger Artist
What do the act of self-weighing, and those numbers on the scales, represent in anorexia and recovery? Is weighing yourself during recovery likely to do more harm or good?

Not Just Curious: What In You Seeks Psychological Insights?

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 27, 2015 in Ambigamy
You could be watching cat videos but instead you read PT Blogs. Why is that? Here's one big appetite for psychological insight

Aerobic Activity vs. Weight Lifting: Which Burns More Fat?

A combination of strength training, aerobic exercise, and reducing caloric intake is a winning formula for weight loss. However, there is one important caveat.

Peanut Butter is My Gateway Drug

By Gregg McBride on April 25, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
Taking the taboo and shame out of a binge can help shed light—and perhaps even some laughter—onto the addictive habits that might be holding us back from finding forgiveness, compassion and (ultimately) success.

The Self "Loathsome Gluttony" of Binge-eating Disorder

Binge eating disorder (BED) is a new diagnostic category in psychiatry's DSM-5 although it was first described in 1959. Already pharmaceutical companies are heavily marketing their medications to this new population.

How We Frame Emotions Through Facial Expressions

How our faces express emotions is a moving window into our minds.

Reducing Your Stress From A Challenging Child

Managing your emotional health is crucial for parenting a difficult child.

Why Writing for Psychology Today Is a Good Idea

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Animal Emotions
A recent essay called "Prof, no one is read you" shows why writing for popular audiences is more effective than publishing in professional journals. It turns out that "82 per cent of articles published in humanities are not even cited once. No one ever refers to 32 per cent of the peer-reviewed articles in the social and 27 per cent in the natural sciences."

The Joy of Distraction

Negative affect is among the most important triggers of self-control failures.

5 Reasons to Go Meat Free Right Now!

In what ways can your mind, body, and spirit benefit from going meatless?

Heisenberg Capacitor

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in One Among Many
Here’s Part III of my effort to strike a blow for hedonism by nullifying Nozick’s experience machine. Reality as it is is good enough. Enjoy it.

How to Quit Unemployment; Help others get What They Want

By Dwain Schenck on April 13, 2015 in Reset
One of the best ways to jump back into the workforce, or better yet, create your own set of income streams, is to become a “people connector”. Most long-term unemployed I know have an insufficient network. They live in a career bubble. One of the best ways to build up your network is to take the blinders off and help others get what they want first.

Worrying

By Joann P. Galst Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in Fertility Factor
Uncertainty is one of the certainties of life. While difficult to cope with, there are ways to help yourself as you traverse your path to parenthood.

The Surprising Effect of Color on Your Mind and Mood

The colors you see influence your thoughts and behaviors--choose the best ones to live your best life.

10 Things To Do Instead of Cheating On Your Diet

By Gregg McBride on April 11, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
We all do it: Eat something we really didn’t want to avoid boredom, avoid stress or to get through a difficult moment. Next time you hit a food mood that really isn’t about hunger, try one of these 10 food substitutes to get through the angst, calorie-free.

Time to SPRING Into a Diet and Keep the Weight Off

As if tax time weren't enough to cause appetite loss....

What to Do When Life Is Short

Dual citizenship as a doctor and as a seriously ill patient had taught him that respectful communication is the bedrock of all medicine.

John Joseph Shows Us Why Healthy Living Is Pure Hardcore

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in Brick by Brick
The Cro-Mags' John Joseph shows us that coping with difficult situations can be hard, but healthy living is the ultimate strategy.

We Break Our Own Hearts

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on April 07, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Our perception is our worst enemy in love and addictive behaviors.

Everything Ends Up as Pornography

By Steve Albrecht DBA on April 07, 2015 in The Act of Violence
Internet access to pornography is negatively reshaping dating relationships Millennials have with each other.

Helping Clients Reconnect with Their Bodies

Clients with histories of physical and sexual abuse or neglect are often chronically disconnected from their bodies. Therapists should be mindful of the fact that survivors of abuse and neglect are likely to live in this state of physical detachment. Helping clients safely reconnect to their bodies is vitally important.

Crossing Borders with Humor

I'm amazed to realize that he did those crazy things to connect with people

Say ‘No’ to the Fiction of Brain Diseases

During my lifetime I have witnessed the fall of Freudian psychiatry and the ascension of molecular psychiatry. Unfortunately, we have gone from the frying pan into the fire. We need to restore psychiatry where it belongs. The psychotherapy of character is an art and a science that bridges the old divide between psychotherapy and the brain.

A Better Way to Prevent Rampage Killings

By Izzy Kalman on March 30, 2015 in Resilience to Bullying
To protect their children from a bullied student who wrote a violent novel describing how he kills them, parents at Tidwell Middle School are demonstrating to have him expelled from school. If anything, their demonstrations may be helping to create a monster and putting their children in greater danger. There is a better way to for these parents to demonstrate.

Misdiagnosis of Bipolar Disorder, Part II

A case study illustrating comorbidity and distinctions between bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder and attention deficit disorder.

Tweeting As Therapy

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in Ambigamy
A lot of therapy focuses on "what's wrong with you?" but eventually graduates to what's up with us?," an embrace of the human condition in all its details. One way to play with "what's up with us?" is to take notes like a social scientist. Observe, reflect, jot share.

Why You Shouldn't Shop When Sleepy

By Nicole Avena Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in Food Junkie
Research suggests that combing the aisles of the supermarket with drooping eyelids may have unintended consequences for your pantry and possibly your diet.