Have you ever attributed a human emotion to a stuffed animal or a pet? How about to a non-living entity, like the government, or to a natural phenomenon, like the wind? Anthropomorphism is the process by which we ascribe human emotions and motivations to inanimate objects, concepts, phenomena, or other species. 

Recent Posts on Anthropomorphism

Does the Meat-Animal Suffering Link Impact Views of Animals?

By Nathan A Heflick Ph.D. on September 30, 2015 The Big Questions
How do people resolve not wanting to harm animals, but enjoying meat?

Dog-Gone It!

I went from being a dog-fearing man all my life, to a "higher level" of being.

Who's More Rational, Human Animals or NON-human Animals?

Discoveries about animal intelligence and emotion, and about human cognition, are challenging our views of which species on the Tree of Life are more rational.

Is Extreme Weather an 'Act of God'?

Researchers from Northwestern University, University of Arizona and Stanford University, have recently published an investigation into first-hand accounts from survivors of two major natural disasters--Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the Chilean earthquake in 2010. Describing the disasters as an 'Act of God' was among the most common explanations.

Chez Chimp: Why Our Primate Cousins Don't Cook

Chimpanzees like their tubers cooked. What does that tell us about what it means to be human?

What Your Dog Wants

Living with a pet provides humans with many physical and psychological benefits. Research shows that the health and well-being of pet owners is greater than that of non-pet-owners. But what about our pets? Sure, we buy them treats and care for them. But do they get deeper, more important rewards from their human relationships? And how might this come about?

Do We Project Our Own Personalities Onto Our Dogs' Behavior?

Dogs can be a sort of psychological mirror since people sometimes use their own personality tendencies to fill in the gaps when trying to interpret ambiguous dog behaviors.