Understanding Aging

By 2030, the number of Americans age 65 and over has been projected to reach about 71.5 million, nearly 10 million of whom will be 85 and up. The good news is that many seniors report better health, greater wealth, and higher levels of education than seniors in past decades. Research on how to stay active and sharp and how to grow wiser is proliferating—it's up to us to act on the information now.

Recent posts on Aging

Lab Chimpanzees Headed To Sanctuary Despite Lobbying Efforts

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on October 26, 2016 in Animal Emotions
A disturbing dispute is brewing over the retirement of laboratory chimpanzees to Chimp Haven because of resistance by the National Association for Biomedical Research.

Learning to Love Barney

By Roberta Satow Ph.D. on October 25, 2016 in Life After 50
I was afraid of dogs, repulsed by them. But I needed to get over it to help my son.
 Ilmicrofono Oggiono/CC by 2.0

The Truth About Hospice

Are you afraid of hospice? Know these facts first.

The Crisis of the Ailing Toxic Mother: Caretake or Run?

By Peg Streep on October 24, 2016 in Tech Support
Much has been written about the "Sandwich" generation-but the daughter of an unloving or abusive mother faces a different, more complicated choice without easy answers...

It's Time to Legalize Marijuana: A Public Health Perspective

Whether it's legal or not, kids are going to use cannabis. Do we really want them to see the police as the enemy and throw them in jail?

The Ageless Inspiration of Activity

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
Ever thought you were too old for something? Aging doesn't mean we have to get old. Getting old comes with all sorts of baggage that isn't a requirement of aging.

The Golden Years: Traumatic Stress and Aging

By Shaili Jain M.D. on October 20, 2016 in The Aftermath of Trauma
Recently, I spoke with Dr. Joan Cook, clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Yale School of Medicine, about PTSD in older adults.

My Mother's First Love at Age 93, by Caroline Leavitt

By Jennifer Haupt on October 20, 2016 in One True Thing
My mother begins to talk about love differently. It’s no longer the thing that ruins lives, that traps you. Instead, it’s this wonderful secret she wants to share with everyone.

How Should Our Diet Change as We Age? (Part 2)

Is there a special diet that will extend our lives?

Do “Brain Games” Sharpen Your Mind?

Over the past decade, scientists have zeroed in on “brain training” to improve cognitive skills. But does it work?

Do You Know When to Confront Your Doctor?

By Eric Haseltine Ph.D. on October 18, 2016 in Long Fuse, Big Bang
Knowing what to say to your doctor can save your life.

Solving Cancer in Ten Years?

Can cells be trained like software?

Death, the Family Killer

By Jessica Zitter MD, MPH on October 13, 2016 in Life and Dignity
Your loved one is suddenly in the ICU on life support, dying. Is your family prepared to handle it?

How Should Our Diet Change as We Age?

Are we what we eat, or what we digest?

When Is Life No Longer “Life”?

By Garth Sundem on October 12, 2016 in Brain Trust
With End-of-Life initiatives on many ballots, here's what "Sister Cities" director, Sean Hanish, has learned about assisted suicide and when "life" is no longer "life".

Gray Divorce: Why Some Grandparents Are Calling It Quits

Would you stay in a stale marriage if you are going to live into your 80s or 90s? Gray divorce is here to stay.
Dora Calott Wang

Growing Pains in the Teenage Brain

By Dora Calott Wang M.D. on October 11, 2016 in The Kitchen Shrink
Growing pains occur more for the teenage brain, than even the teenage body

A Noble Nobel: How Cell Recycling Benefits You

From Alzheimer's to cancer, the Nobel Committee recognizes something critical to your life.

Alzheimer's Study Links Triad of Brain Areas with Cognition

By Christopher Bergland on October 07, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have discovered that various Alzheimer's disease symptoms are linked to a combination of atrophy factors in three different brain regions.

The Man Who Could See the Invisible

Thinking about Hurricane Matthew and its possible effects

Fallacy of Fluid/Crystalized Intelligence in Older Adults

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on October 05, 2016 in iAge
Fluid and Crystalized intelligence are a remnant of an old eugenicist legacy that have no practical or clinical use today. Is it time to discard them?

Suicide: Not All in the Head

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on October 05, 2016 in iAge
The reason why suicide is going up is because we are ignoring its social component. A hundred years of research and we need to revisit Durkheim's suicide theory.

What Is the Link Between Alcohol and Creative Genius?

By Tom Shroder on October 05, 2016 in Acid Test
My author grandfather said he couldn't write when he wasn't drinking. It might have won him a Pulitzer Prize. It definitely killed him.

Elder Orphans: A Real Problem or a New Way to Scare Singles?

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on October 04, 2016 in Living Single
Elder orphans: a serious concern, a scare story to put uppity singles in their place, and a term that should be put to rest

How Aging Affects Our Sleep

What can we do to sleep well?

Staying Physically Active Promotes Self-Reliance as You Age

By Christopher Bergland on September 30, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study from Yale University reports that staying moderately physically active is key to maintaining mobility and a state of independence as people get older.

Oxygen and Aging

What is best way to combat free-radicals of oxygen?

I Think, Therefore I'll Die

By Steve Stankevicius M.D. on September 28, 2016 in The Skeptical Shrink
For many, the afterlife offers the quintessential form of closing the eyes and blocking the ears. But for people like myself who do not subscribe to the stories, what are we to do?

Memory Loss Associated With Alzheimer's May Be Reversible

By Kevin Murnane, Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in The Info Monkey
New research holds out hope that the loss of memory function that accompanies Alzheimer's may be preventable and reversible if the disease is caught early enough.

The Golden Years...Not So Golden.

By Ana Nogales on September 28, 2016 in Family Secrets
Think of the last day of your life. How will you feel to reflect on your journey?