Understanding Aging

By 2030, the number of Americans age 65 and over is projected to be about 71.5 million, of which nearly 10 million will be 85 and up. The good news is that many seniors report better health, greater wealth, and higher levels of education than seniors in past decades. Research on how to stay active and sharp and how to grow wiser is proliferating—it's up to us to act on the information now.

Recent Posts on Aging

Lifespan

By Mario D Garrett PhD on March 27, 2015 in iAge
Why do people confuse lifespan, with life expectancy, with average years of life and years expected to live?

Genetics of Longevity

By Mario D Garrett PhD on March 27, 2015 in iAge
There is a schism between lifespan and theoretical lifespan…human behavior.

Life Expectancy

By Mario D Garrett PhD on March 26, 2015 in iAge
Check a dictionary and the entry for Life Expectancy is WRONG...no wonder so many people misunderstand the concept.

Secular Man, Religious Funeral

By Phil Zuckerman Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in The Secular Life
Will your funeral reflect your values?

Do You Feel Sexy on the Inside?

By Rick Miller LICSW on March 23, 2015 in Unwrapped
Expanding the ways in which we feel “sexy” is good for everyone (yup, except maybe for the beauty industry that sells just one way).

The New Adulthood

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 23, 2015 in The Prime of Life
The challenge: To lead a life without well-define norms, roles, and expectations.

Wresting Meaning from Loss

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 21, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Coping with loss -- then and now.

Whatever Doesn't Kill You, Will Only Make You Stronger?

By Dawn C. Carr MGS, Ph.D. on March 20, 2015 in The Third Age
When bad stuff happens to resilient people, it appears that in the short-term they don’t do anything different from what nonresilient people do. Instead, they feel something different about their ability to handle things. And as a result, they fare better physically and psychologically over the long-term.

What Would You Tell Your 20-year-old Self?

Wouldn't it be nice to save time and learn life lessons earlier? Ask the simple question of what you wished you'd known earlier and maybe you can save yourself--or someone you care about--a bit of time, energy and drama.

How to Spend the Time You Have Left

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 20, 2015 in A Sideways View
Today is the first day of the rest of your life! Are you living life to the full? Are you spending your time wisely?

Good Friends Make for Better Health

By Katherine Bouton on March 19, 2015 in What I Hear
Psychologists Howard Friedman and Leslie Martin found that the single strongest social predictor of long life was a strong social network. People with hearing loss sometimes have to make themselves keep up those social connections. Those who work with the elderly should be aware of how much hearing loss may be contributing to social isolation.

Want to Feel Good, Live Better, and Probably Live Longer?

The other night I watched with great interest a PBS special on heart health. The focus of the show was on Dr. Steven Masley’s book titled "The 30-Day Heart Tune-Up," to be released in paperback next month.

Worrying About Dementia

By Temma Ehrenfeld on March 17, 2015 in Open Gently
Anxiety is a risk factor for dementia.

Tackling Mid-Life Weight Issues: A 5-Step Plan

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on March 16, 2015 in Cravings
Maintaining a healthy weight and fitness level as you get older is as much about getting enough sleep and stress relief as it is about eating right and exercising.

12 Tips for Caring for Someone with Alzheimer’s

Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s is certainly one of the most stressful challenges a person can undertake. It can interfere with providing good care, and can lead to hastened placement of the individual in a facility. The stress of caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s can be harmful to you, as well. What can you do about it?

5 Ways to Motivate and Encourage Seniors

Caring for, and having successful relationships with older adults often require unique interpersonal skills and strategies.

Want to Live Longer? Make Good Friends.

By Dawn C. Carr MGS, Ph.D. on March 15, 2015 in The Third Age
It may be surprising, but who you choose as a friend matters, and so does the quality of those friendships. Good relationships have a potent beneficial impact on your health.

Older Sad Man Syndrome

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 15, 2015 in How To Do Life
Although not clinically depressed, many of my older male clients are sad.

Strategies for Growing the Transhumanism Movement

Transhumanism—the international movement that aims to use science and technology to improve the human being—has been growing quickly in the last few years. But for the movement to grow more, better strategies will need to be implemented.

Comforting Third Spaces

The best third spaces are green spaces.

Notes from an Older Dad

My journey to being a mostly full-time dad demonstrates how having a child can alter one’s personal identity and sense of masculinity, especially when one is older.

Refiring Your Organization

Here's how innovative programs for older workers can solve America's executive brain drain.

18 Ways to Add Oomph to Your Everyday Activities

Physical exercise has many brain health benefits, and reduces the risk of mild cognitive impairment and dementia. But you don’t have to hit the gym to get your heart pumping! Here are 18 ways to add umph to your everyday activities.

Wanting and Finding Love After Fifty

By Donna Flagg on March 13, 2015 in Honestly
Why do people think finding love later in life is doomed from the start?

Do We Age in Stages?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 12, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Today's adults have greater freedom than ever to decide how best to live.

Meeting the Needs of the Alzheimer's Family

Addressing the concerns of Alzheimer's care partners and families is critical, but research would suggest that, too often, doctors are not meeting these needs.

8 Pet Peeves about Doctors

I’ve had some excellent medical care, so I want don’t want to paint with too broad a brush. But the following have happened to me and others multiple times, so I think it’s fair to call them Pet Peeves.

Antidepressants: The Wrong Drug for the Problem?

By Katherine Bouton on March 08, 2015 in What I Hear
Widespread use of antidepressants among the elderly, including the antipsychotic Abilify. Widespread undiagnosed and untreated hearing loss in the same demographic. Could there be a link? Maybe patients should get a hearing test before doctors write the prescription for antidepressants.

Who Says Wanting Control is a Bad Thing?

Yet, when it comes to our bodies, wanting to feel in charge is completely normal. But as we age it becomes less likely that we can control our bodies.

What Is Your Life Goal? 5 Personal 'Bottom Lines'

Organizations measure their success based on measurable, “bottom line” variables. What about people? What are you striving for? What gives your life meaning? Here are personal bottom lines.