All About Adolescence

Adolescence describes the teenage years between 13 and 19 and can be considered the transitional stage from childhood to adulthood. However, the physical and psychological changes that occur in adolescence can start earlier, during the preteen or "tween" years (ages 9 through 12). Adolescence can be a time of both disorientation and discovery. The transitional period can bring up issues of independence and self-identity; many adolescents and their peers face tough choices regarding schoolwork, sexuality, drugs, alcohol, and social life. Peer groups, romantic interests, and external appearance tend to naturally increase in importance for some time during a teen's journey toward adulthood.

Recent posts on Adolescence

“Why Me?”

By Greg O'Brien on December 02, 2016 in On Pluto
There was a time when Brooklyn was the world.

Social Anxiety: A Single-Session Cure

My patient never returned. Her father called four days later, delighted to report that I had “worked a miracle.” Yet I see what happened as a failure on my part.

Failure to Launch Syndrome

By Jeffery S. Smith M.D. on November 30, 2016 in Healing and Growing
There are many "causes," but one real reason stands out to explain today's epidemic of young adults who remain stuck in life.

A Step-Child's Guide to Step-Parenting

Each family has its own story with its own peculiar complexities, but most have a moment in which the new boyfriend or girlfriend becomes a parent...

Circle of Support: A Message for Teens About Friendship

We all need friends to help us get through life’s good and bad times.

Is My Son Being Abused By His Girlfriend?

By Barbara Greenberg Ph.D. on November 29, 2016 in The Teen Doctor
What to do when you don't like your child's partner

To Punish or to Teach?

How we handle mistakes can make a difference.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Adolescence and the Worrisome Transition to High School

Worry can increase anxiety, but it can also spare a lot of harm.
By sylvar from Tampa, Florida, United States (I'm not a tomboy — I'm just better than you.) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0) or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The New Tomboy

Girls are given more leeway than boys in their gender presentation and, thus, it is more acceptable to be a tomboy than a sissy.

Help! My College Kid Is Driving Me Crazy

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on November 26, 2016 in Social Lights
How do we know when our kids are back at home?

My Daughter's Boyfriend Broke Up With Her For No Reason

By Barbara Greenberg Ph.D. on November 22, 2016 in The Teen Doctor
How to deal with abrupt breakups
Voyagerix / AdobeStock

When Your Son or Daughter Stops Calling

Parents might panic when their 20-something children move away and cut off communication. But at that age, some estrangement may be par for the course. It's usually temporary.

The Truth About Lying

By Stuart Shanker DPhil on November 22, 2016 in Self-Reg
Lying is the quintessential example of misbehaviour, but confabulating is a stress behaviour.

10 Ways to Meet New People – A Message for Teens

When it comes to communication, few of us have a natural knack, but that doesn’t mean we can’t learn to be effective in expressing ourselves with others.

The Cure for Campus Loneliness

By Marcia Morris M.D. on November 20, 2016 in College Wellness
It’s strange to think that you could feel lonely on a campus of 500 or 5,000 students, but it happens all the time.

Family Matters When It Comes to Becoming a Bully

Are family characteristics linked to becoming a bully? Yes, and that gives the family preventive power.

The “Do You Know?” 20 Questions About Family Stories

By Robyn Fivush Ph.D. on November 19, 2016 in The Stories of Our Lives
The "Do You Know..?" questions are one way to tell family stories and begin a tradition of sharing more.

Going to College With Bipolar Disorder - Part II

By Russ Federman Ph.D., A.B.P.P. on November 17, 2016 in Bipolar You
The second half of a two-part blog post pertaining to the issues faced by college-bound high school students with bipolar disorder.

Going to College With Bipolar Disorder - Part I

By Russ Federman Ph.D., A.B.P.P. on November 17, 2016 in Bipolar You
The first half of a two-part blog post pertaining to the issues and challenges faced by college-bound high school students with bipolar disorder.
g-stockstudio/Shutterstock

Failure to Launch Now Threatens the U.S. Economy

By David F Lancy Ph.D. on November 17, 2016 in Benign Neglect
The failure to launch syndrome begins in infancy.

Post-Election Blues

Anxiety and depression among teens are on the rise after the election. How to help them cope.

Making a Sexual Debut

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on November 16, 2016 in Media Spotlight
Despite the controversy surrounding first-time sex, most young people in the United States become sexually active long before they reach adulthood.

The Secret to Youth Moral Development

Ever wonder how teens develop moral lives? How they learn to think critically and believe in their abilities to change the world? Adults provide the scaffolding!

Adolescence: A Continuum of Growth

Is your teen stressing you out? Understanding what they are going through can help.

My Student Has a Crush on Me

By Barbara Greenberg Ph.D. on November 14, 2016 in The Teen Doctor
What to do about student/teacher crushes.

Crossover Fiction Gets Parents & Teens Talking

Using a conversation-based approach to discussing fiction, teens are afforded a safe space to learn about preventive mental health.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

When Becoming Step Parent to an Adolescent

The attached, young child is more likely to accept and bond with a step parent, than the adolescent who is detaching and differentiating for more independence and individuality.
By Rambler0 (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Do Tomboys Grow Up To Be Lesbian?

It is more the addition of masculinity rather than a deletion of femininity that distinguishes tomboy from non-tomboy girls.

How to Keep Politics Out of the Playground

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on November 11, 2016 in Feeling It
No matter what our political affiliation, our children are entering a deeply divided society and playground. Here's how to keep playgrounds safe and your children resilient.

7 Ways to Help Kids End Bullying

The real antidotes to bullying are not found in policies and procedures but rather in person-to-person connections, grounded in kindness and empathy.