All About Adolescence

Adolescence describes the teenage years between 13 and 19 and can be considered the transitional stage from childhood to adulthood. However, the physical and psychological changes that occur in adolescence can start earlier, during the preteen or "tween" years (ages 9 through 12). Adolescence can be a time of both disorientation and discovery. The transitional period can bring up issues of independence and self-identity; many adolescents and their peers face tough choices regarding schoolwork, sexuality, drugs, alcohol, and their social life. Peer groups, romantic interests and external appearance tend to naturally increase in importance for some time during a teen's journey toward adulthood.

Recent Posts on Adolescence

Why Group Projects Fail

By Rebecca Jackson on March 04, 2015 in School of Thought
Although the benefits can be substantial for students, careful planning and instruction on the part of the teacher is essential for group projects. It’s empowering for students to be given choices and freedom when it comes to learning; but it’s hard for kids to accept responsibility when things don’t work out.

You Just Found Your Kid’s Drug Stash - Now What?

Don’t delay in talking to your child. Take a little time to get educated about commonly abused drugs and adolescent substance use trends so you can better assess your child’s risks.

My Wife Drove My Son to Suicide

What to do when your wife hates your son

4 Secrets to Negotiate with Difficult People

By Aldo Civico Ph.D. on March 04, 2015 in Turning Point
Are you dealing with a grumpy teenager, or an impossible boss? Here are 4 secrets suggested by successful mediators to deal with difficult people and situations.

Adolescents Are Prone to Love Addiction

If someone falls in love and believes her love may be requited, parts of her brain take on the chemistry of a brain on cocaine.

Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors

By The Book Brigade on March 03, 2015 in The Author Speaks
The millions of teens and adults who engage in self-destructive behavior do so because they never learned more constructive ways of soothing themselves in moments of distress. Many have engaged in such behaviors for so long that they can't envision a way out. But it's possible to replace self-destructive acts with kinder means of coping.

When Boys Feel Like Girls and Girls Feel Like Boys

By Elizabeth Wagele on March 03, 2015 in The Career Within You
“I told my mom, and she reacted extremely negatively, telling me that it was a phase, that I would never truly be a girl, that God doesn’t make mistakes, that I am wrong. If you are reading this, parents, please don’t tell this to your kids.”

The Brain Is Not an Octopus

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on March 02, 2015 in Mind Change
Engaging in several tasks at once might seem like a wonderful solution for keeping pace with the speed of twenty-first-century life, but the price paid could be high.

Adolescent Self-Management for a Successful Independence

A major goal of parenting high school age adolescents is helping them develop basic skills of self-management that will support more independence soon to come.

Midlife: Adult's Prime

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 02, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Why middle age truly is the prime of life.

Loneliness and Internet Use

At any given moment, hundreds of millions of people from all around the world are surfing the Internet, People rely on such networks to build and maintain their social contacts. Whether this new opportunity to be in social contact around the clock has enhanced people's well-being ?

Treatment for Borderline Disorder May Reduce Distortions

By Randi Kreger on March 01, 2015 in Stop Walking on Eggshells
My teenage sister was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. We have a difficult relationship, and sometimes I feel like interacting with her is just not worth the trouble. For example, I have caught her lying on too many occasions to count, and she always makes excuses. Now, she blames it on her psychological problems. Can lying be treated?

Could You Be Addicted to Your Cell Phone?

Could you go 24 hours without your cell phone? Many people can't!

8 Warning Signs Your Lover is a Narcissist

The Mayo Clinic research group defines narcissistic personality disorder as “a mental disorder in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance and a deep need for admiration." How do you know when your romantic partner may be a narcissist? Here are eight telltale signs...

The Paradox of Modern Adulthood

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Less secure, less stable, more anxious, yet better nonetheless.

A Mother's Love: Myths, Misconceptions, and Truths

By Peg Streep on February 26, 2015 in Tech Support
Commonly held ideas about motherhood shape the dialogue we have culturally, get in the way of understanding parent-child conflict, and affect each of us individually by setting a high and sometimes impossible standard. Why it's time to banish some of the myths that animate the discussion and start a new conversation.

Envisioning the Future for Your Child with Autism

By Chantal Sicile-Kira on February 25, 2015 in The Autism Advocate
When envisioning the future of your child as an adult – any child – it’s important to focus on the strengths that are apparent. And as the parent of a child with autism, it’s even more important. The strengths your child has will help him overcome his deficits, perhaps even become a way for your child to be employed as an adult, or be motivated to learn new skills.

3 Reasons Your Kids Won't Take "No" For An Answer

By Erica Reischer Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in What Great Parents Do
The surprising truth about why your kids won't take "no" for an answer and what to do about it

Stop Hating Yourself Once and For All

By Lisa Firestone Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Compassion Matters
Throughout a given day, we experience a barrage of sadistic thoughts so smoothly and so frequently that we hardly notice we’re under attack. We may try to compensate for insecurities, but deep down, we are our own worst enemy. So, what causes us to turn against ourselves and how can we stop?

New Sleep Guidelines to Keep Youth Healthy

By Richard Taite on February 24, 2015 in Ending Addiction for Good
Without regular age appropriate amounts of sleep, adolescents are at risk for developing a variety of conditions such as depression, anxiety, weight change, and sometimes insomnia.

How Changes in Media Use Can Transform Mental Health

By Rebecca Jackson on February 24, 2015 in School of Thought
Morning grouchiness is not an uncommon complaint from parents—especially parents of teenagers. But what happens when your child's mood doesn't improve throughout the day—when your child seems to be terminally bad-tempered? This case study examines the effect of media multitasking on a teenage boy's mental health.

Ebb and Flow

By Stephen Gray Wallace on February 24, 2015 in Decisions Teens Make
Overuse of technology by young people may result in distraction, stress and impaired performance. Help them find flow!

How to Tell if Your Child Is Depressed

If you’re waiting for your child to admit to being depressed, you’re going to be waiting a long time. Maybe too long. As parents, we need to be proactive and know the signs of childhood depression.

3 Myths About Eating Disorders Debunked

By Nicole Avena Ph.D. on February 24, 2015 in Food Junkie
Eating disorders can be very difficult to understand. In honor of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, take some time to learn a bit more about these disorders and the truth behind a handful of myths that surround them.

Personality Disorders Explained 2: Origins

By Michael Karson Ph.D., J.D. on February 24, 2015 in Feeling Our Way
Every cognitive map of the social world also defines a role for the person to play; a personality disorder implies a limited number of acceptable roles.

Moody Teen? Three Strategies That Help

By Nancy Darling Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Thinking About Kids
It's not hormones that make teens volatile and moody, it's their crazy schedule and their physical needs. Teens grow as fast as toddlers and - like toddlers - will throw tantrums when they don't get what they want and need. You can't change their school days, but you can help them get what they need to stay happy and be easier to live with.

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 1 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute, in 1,000 words or less, the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." In a three-part blog post, I explain why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.

Helping Adolescents Keep Agreements

With more actively and passively resistant adolescents parents must work harder to get agreements made. Getting this habit of keeping agreements in place matters for healthy relationships with parents now, and for significant relationships later on.

The case FOR social media, TV, phoning, and video games

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 22, 2015 in How To Do Life
Why parents shouldn't worry so much about their kids' electronic recreation.

8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victimhood, and victory versus defeat. Here are eight negative attitudes of chronically unhappy people...