Phil Reed D.Phil.

Phil Reed, D.Phil., is a professor of psychology at Swansea University. He obtained a D.Phil. from the University of York and previously held a Research Fellowship at the University of Oxford, and a Readership in Learning and Behaviour at University College London.

Phil's broad basic and applied research interests include: Learning and Behaviour; Autism, Special Needs, and Educational Interventions; and Psychology and Medicine, including Digital Dependence, and Uro/Gynaecological Health. Phil has written several books, including Interventions for Autism: Evidence for Educational and Clinical Practice, and published over 240 papers. He has been invited to present his work at many international conferences.

Phil’s research includes both basic theoretical analyses of psychological concepts, and evaluation of interventions, services, and products in relation to psychological and behavioural factors impacting effectiveness. Phil and his team have presented their work in Women’s Health at the National Assembly for Wales, and were awarded the ‘Medal of the President of the Republic’ of Italy in 2016 for scientific contribution to society.

Phil appears regularly in the media, and has been featured on the Science Channel’s ‘Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman’, ‘ITV Wales’, ‘BBC Wales’, and ‘BBC Radio Wales’. There have been two radio specials on Phil’s Digital Dependence research on syndicated U.S. radio shows (Richie Allen; Katherine Albrecht), and features in Time Magazine, Cosmopolitan, The Sunday Times, The Daily Mail, and locally in the Swansea Evening Post, and the Western Mail.

Phil serves on Editorial Boards for leading journals and has held appointments for UK Departments for Health and Education and Children in Wales Policy Council. Phil has worked with public-sector organisations, medical and educational charities, private businesses, and has received funding from Tenovus Cancer Care, NHS, LEAs, Baily Thomas Fund, ESRC, Leverhulme Trust, and Mechner Foundation.

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Digital World, Real World

The psychological and social effects of digital technology Read now.

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