The Latest

Workplace Bullying: A Real Issue, A Real Solution

By Shimi Kang M.D. on March 25, 2015 in The Dolphin Way
Tigertown is a pushing, demanding, and stifling workplace. The hours are long, and the management is predatory, the employees are solitary, there is little community – definitely no mentors, and no time for fun or collegial bonding. Tigertown is an incubator for an insidiously growing problem - workplace bullying.

Brian Williams, Journalism, and Celebrity Culture

When journalists start living in a celebrity bubble, bad things can happen. Just ask Brian Williams. His downfall reminds us of the malleability of memory, and it also poses a cautionary tale to all journalists, particularly to the trend in journalism education to promote "entrepreneurial" journalism -- teaching aspiring journalists to cultivate their own "brand".

Is the Wedding Still On?

There's more to deciding how to treat acne than counting the pimples.

10 Awkward Moments, and 6 Ways to Escape Them

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on March 25, 2015 in Living Single
We all have socially awkward experiences, but what makes a social interaction so uncomfortable? Research has pointed to 10 kinds of experiences that are especially likely to make people feel awkward, and 6 things people can do to escape from the awkwardness (without just walking away) and feel comfortable again.

10 Reasons You Should Go to Sleep Right Now

On the myriad benefits of sleep, glorious sleep.

'Misremembering' Is All Too Human and All Too Common

When do you cross the line between forgetting and lying?

9 Ways to Restore Balance to a Relationship

Do you feel the power has been shifting in your relationship? Did you suddenly find yourself adjusting your calendar according to your partner’s schedule, canceling appointments to have lunch with her (or him), waiting for her to call or write, following her around like a little puppy dog? Here are 10 ways to change things around.

5 of the Oddest-Ever Psychology Experiments

Over the years, psychologists have come up with some ingenious experiments in an effort to study human behavior. Here are some of the oddest psychological studies ever conducted.

Delirious Mania?

On March 9, on a Monday afternoon in DeKalb County, Georgia, Anthony Hill, a black Air Force veteran in postdeployment from Afghanistan, removed all his clothes, slid down from the balcony of his second-floor apartment, and began walking.
Addiction or Dependency?  Does it Matter?

Addiction or Dependency? Does it Matter?

Many of my patients often ask me, “What’s the difference between being addicted to prescription pain medications versus being dependent?” To help shed light on this important topic, I’d like to examine each classification.

4 Reasons Kids Stop Respecting Their Parents

Just telling kids their behavior is not okay is not enough

10 Signs That Your Lover Is Commitment Phobic

True commitment phobia is fear of any kind of commitment that involves other people, not just relationship commitment. Here are 10 signs that can help you spot it.

6 Myths About Intimacy

Both men and women have myths about intimacy. The problem with these myths is that when believed, they can result in dysfunctional relationships.

Sex in the Head

What is sexual desire? Is it raw, animal instinct? Or is it something more mindful?

The Case of Claire Underwood

Two weeks ago, I used the character of Frank Underwood as a “case study” to illustrate the misunderstood psychiatric diagnosis of Antisocial Personality Disorder, and many of you asked: Well, what about his wife, Claire?

Two Synesthetes Walk Into a Bar...

By Maureen Seaberg on March 25, 2015 in Sensorium
What's So Funny About Synesthesia? Plenty!

4 Steps to End Emotional Eating

Is food your best friend and your worst enemy? It doesn't have to be this way.

Unnaturally Good: The Plight of the Goody Two-Shoes

There’s authentic virtue, and then there’s a kind of chronic, not-quite-credible virtue that doesn’t—and can’t—reflect the individual’s true nature. Their righteous words and actions, though perceivable as virtuous, may not come from their heart but their head. And what they say may belie what they’re really thinking—may not, in essence, “capture” who they truly are.

Smart Strategies to Detect a Liar Online

More than 20 million people visit online dating services every months. But there is a lot of creeps out there. Some online-daters put up photos from 20 years ago. Some lie about their age, their job situation, their marital status, or their personality traits. Given all this uncertainty, how do you best navigate through the jungle of online profiles?

Is Flirting Ever Unethical?

Can flirting be unethical? The answer to that question depends on what counts as flirting.

Peter Singer Argues for "Effective Altruism" in His New Book

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 25, 2015 in Animal Emotions
Renowned philosopher Peter Singer's new book called "The Most Good You Can Do" is a very thoughtful discussion about charitable giving. Whether you agree or disagree with Professor Singer's arguments I guarantee they will make you think deeply about what you do with your money and if your donations really do the most good you can do. This book also left me hopeful.

The Infestation Begins: Terror on the Prairie

What if a doctor fainted at the sight of blood, an actor trembled when facing an audience, or an entomologist panicked amidst a swarm of insects? Professionals might have access to certain knowledge and skills, but experts are humans. So what does a scientist do when he loses his nerve and can no longer sustain a safe, psychological distance from the object of his study?
Changing Our Perspectives on Mental Illness and Health

Changing Our Perspectives on Mental Illness and Health

Addicts and those with co-occurring disorders such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD are frequently overwhelmed by shame. This is not just an internal issue of being ashamed of past behaviors.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Pregnancy Loss Etiquette

If approximately one million expectant parents per year experience a pregnancy loss, why do people struggle on how to act towards them? Most people are well intended and want to be supportive, but have no idea how to approach it.

What Parents Can’t Do

More than twice as many states required parental consent for mental health treatment than for substance abuse treatment.

Obama and Netanyahu in Family Therapy

After the initial evaluation and assessment, the therapist identified three classic family dysfunctions that exist in the relationship between Barack and Bibi: enmeshment, triangulation, and emotional cut-offs.
Emboldened by Email: Walking the Talk

Emboldened by Email: Walking the Talk

Is email good for relationships or not? Does it foster connectedness? Does it allow for the confessional moment which face to face contact inhibits? OR does email (as well as its cousin, texting) provide a constant distraction from being present with one another?