The Latest

Changing Clocks Causes Cancer?

Changing Clocks Causes Cancer?

Time rules life. Does disrupting inner body clocks cause cancer?

10 Signs You’re Dating a Narcissist

The Mayo Clinic research group defines narcissistic personality disorder as “a mental disorder in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance and a deep need for admiration. How do you know when you’re dating a narcissist? Here are ten telltale signs...

An Invaluable Lesson From Elders

Although suffering in life is inevitable, we can mitigate it.

Will Individual Investors Succeed with Equity Crowdfunding?

Equity crowdfunding is less than two years old in the United States and is just starting to take off. It offers a lot of promise and peril to individual investors and an exciting new phenomenon for psychology researchers to study.

Dumped Without An Explanation: Is There Anything To Do?

A woman feels dumped without explanation by her close friend and wonders how to move on.
Love, Sex, and Pornography

Love, Sex, and Pornography

By Frances Cohen Praver Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Love Doc
Liz sat on the far end of the couch and smiled weakly.”I love Adam and I want to make him happy.”


“Uh huh…” I said.

Liz continued. “I feel I’m falling short of my goal. I would do next to anything to please Adam. But there are some things I’m not so sure about.”

Stories of Seclusion: Embarassed into Isolation

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in How To Do Life
The price of an affair can be great indeed.

Dangerous Friends: The Master Manipulators

The best way to handle the manipulative people in our lives is to become less manipulatable. We are only as easily manipulated as we choose to be – manipulators make us feel good when we bend to their needs.

Otome: What We Can Learn About Love from J-Romance Games

By Ravi Chandra M.D. on July 25, 2015 in The Pacific Heart
Otome are romance simulation games, primarily for girls and women, initially made in Japan but now spreading worldwide. I was interviewed for the Bullet Train podcast as a psychiatrist to comment on what we can learn about love from otome. A lot, it turns out!

Improving Self-Control by Enhancing Working Memory

Successful self-control involves the active maintenance of goals and goal-relevant information in working memory.

Earth to Humans: Why Have You Forsaken Me? Sunk Costs

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on July 25, 2015 in The Green Mind
What are the psychological roadblocks that explain why we’re not doing much to solve global climate change—a phenomenon that threatens the core of our society? This is the fourth post in a seven-part series.

Psychiatry: The Step-Child of Medicine

What makes psychiatry unique in the realm of other medical specialties

Is It True That Your Physical Pain Is In Your Mind?

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on July 25, 2015 in Off the Couch
“I think there’s something wrong,” Marjorie said. “I feel like I have a urinary tract infection all the time. But the doctor can’t find anything the matter. He says I have an anxiety disorder." A week later, tests showed that she had a UTI. Why hadn't the doctor picked it up before?

Treating Eating Disorders the New-Fashioned Way

The establishment and assuredness of a safe and trusting relationship between patient and therapist prior to making the transition from office to on-line, plus symptoms being well under control or gone, then YES, my experience has shown that continued progress and recovery is possible, particularly for eating disorder patients with underlying anxiety & depression.


The Problem with a Trust-But-Verify Approach

As a leader, do you know when to use a "trust, but verify" approach at work, and when not to? Are you making a common mistake about trust? Find out; plus explore five practices effective leaders use to build trust.

Cats: Owners Say Let Them be Predators and Kill Wildlife

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 25, 2015 in Animal Emotions
A new study conducted in the UK shows people are fine with free-running cats killing wildlife and that experts disagree with whether or not cats are having a significant ecological impact. One researcher claims that the evidence is "flimsy." Many people also say "let them be cats" and pay the price for being allowed to roam freely. Clearly there are many issues at hand.

How Are You Portraying Yourself When Using Social Media?

By Gregg McBride on July 25, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
When did vitriol become a national pastime and filling our social media feeds with hatred become de rigeur? Has initially greeting someone we don't understand (or even that we don't agree with) with kindness become a thing of the past?

5 Tips for a More Relaxing Urban Walk

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on July 25, 2015 in Minding the Body
A walk down city streets is generally less calming than a nature hike. But these tips can make an urban walk more relaxing and refreshing.

5 Ways to Break Bad News without Actually Lying

Very few, if any, of us truly enjoys being the bearer of bad news. If you have no choice but to be that messenger, there are ways to get the job done with a minimum of damaged feelings. These 5 strategies will help you figure out how to make the best out of some of life’s unpleasant situations.

A Crash Course on Gender Differences - Session 10

By Eyal Winter on July 25, 2015 in Feeling Smart
On Sex, Procreation and Sperm Compitition: How do Human Beings Differ from Animals.

Stories of Seclusion: An Immigrant Shocked at Her Workplace

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 25, 2015 in How To Do Life
How a too laid-back workplace drove a woman into isolation.

It’s Time For Our Culture Of Overwork To Be Over

By Tim Leberecht on July 24, 2015 in The Romance of Work
We may talk a good game about how we want to achieve the ever-elusive work/life balance—but what do we do about it? How many of us approach it with the kind of profound urgency that marks the conundrums we attempt to solve at work? I had the chance recently to sit down with Brigid Schulte, author of "Overwhelmed: How to Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time."

The Neuroscience of Savoring Positive Emotions

Neuroscientists have linked sustained activation of a brain region called the ventral striatum to savoring positive emotions. Ventral striatal activation is in the locus of your control. Researchers believe that regularly practicing loving-kindness meditation and compassion activates this brain region and increases the ability to savor positive emotions.

Breaking The Bystander Effect in Sports Concussions

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on July 24, 2015 in Brain Trauma
We witness concussions frequently, yet from the sidelines and stands, we may gasp or cringe. But we definitely won't do or say anything, right? It's the dreaded "Bystander Effect," that has people stunned still when someone yells, "call 911!" However, I propose every youth sports team in the US empower a "Concussion Coordinator" to solve this problem.

Spiritual Power to Redirect the Impact of Divorce

Children often experience divorce as the death of the family. Parents may draw upon spiritual insight to redefine the family, demonstrating how authentic faith models healthy relating, among other critical qualities to support the child's development of healthy relationships.

The Value of the Therapeutic Relationship — Part One

I have always considered therapy a “gift” and the decision to work with a therapist a proactive sign of self-compassion and courage as well as a healthy statement about one’s desire to learn, grow, and heal. However, for countless people the idea of seeking out therapy and opening up about painful emotions, intimate or shame-based thoughts and behaviors is too daunting, an

47 Reasons Why It's Really, Really Good to Be an Aunt

By Melanie Notkin on July 24, 2015 in Savvy Auntie
Every aunt knows how fortunate we are to have the love of our nieces and nephews. And we are grateful to their parents, who have given us the gift of aunthood. And so, Auntie's Day is also a time for us to appreciate all really good things that aunthood brings...

Marriage Preparation

The good news is that you don’t have to have had a great track record in the relationship department or in your personal family experience in order to develop the skills and character traits that enhance the likelihood of success in relationships.

Eating at Night Disrupts Sleep

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
When you’re considering the food choices you make in order to support your health, keep in mind that you’re also influencing how well you sleep—and that it’s not just what you eat, but when, that may matter.
Happify With Your Strengths!

Happify With Your Strengths!

Interested in the science of character strengths? Get tons of interesting research and information all in one image!