The Latest

What To Do About a Small Penis

If size is an issue, the trick is to find ways to make up for the lack in volume. Penis extension devices, such as Andropenis, and penis extension surgery carry with them significant inconvenience and risk. In most cases choice of sexual position can make up for a lack in size.

5 Reasons That Life Is Hard

If you're like me, you've got a computer, a smart phone, a TV, a couch, some pets, a great family, and lots of awesome things - but you still often find that life is hard. Evolutionary psychology can help explain why.

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Josh Rouse shares how he has been able to conquer anxiety through mindfulness.

The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Rules—But Whose Hand Is It?

The history of the nature/nurture controversy reveals fraud on the nurture side and developments in our view of nature that the imprinted brain theory readily explains.
The Shocking Truth of Gadget Use

The Shocking Truth of Gadget Use

With every two out of three Americans owning a smartphone, our digital diet has expanded exponentially. The average American spends 11 hours with electronic gadgets every day.

Putting the Happiness Back in “Young and Happy”

By Ran Zilca on April 17, 2015 in Confessions of a Techie
Happiness is a by-product of the pursuit of success, rather than successful accomplishments. Individuals who are actively engaged in the pursuit of goals that are meaningful to them, experience a range of positive emotions and become happier.

Nine Ways to Improve Your Time Management

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in How To Do Life
We all seem to need to do more in less time. These tips can help.

Harming the Innocent to Punish the Guilty

By Peter Toohey on April 16, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
There are three harrowing stories here, one modern concerning Katherine Knight, and two from Greek mythology concerning Procne and Atreus. Mental derangement, jealousy and resentment, and profoundly dysfunctional families are at the heart of the cannibalistic stories. They dramatize the harm that is inflicted on the innocent in order to punish the apparently guilty.

Unique Musical "Chairs"

What training opportunities exist for professional musicians who want to incorporate knowledge and skills in performance psychology? Where might they go to augment their expertise, whether as a professor, a licensed mental health practitioner with a specialty niche, or a mental skills coach for other musicians?

12 Ways to Reduce Your Stress

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in How To Do Life
These tactics have been effective for my clients...and for me.

The Gold Standard for Healing the World...

Remember an incident when someone listened deeply to you and then talked with you when you were in a bad place. Would you want to honor that person if you could? If so, they would just want you to do onto someone else what they did onto you. Isn't that so?

Cyberbullying? There’s an App for That

In the 2004 teen comedy “Mean Girls,” a central plot point is a notebook filled with vicious rumors and gossip — the “Burn Book,” it is called. Now the concept has been taken into the social media age with the “Burnbook” app.

A Twin Pioneer

By Nancy L Segal Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Twofold
Meet a Twin Pioneer

Ruling Against V. Stiviano Sets Dangerous Precedence

By Robin Sax on April 16, 2015 in Crime Time
Judge Richard Fruin got it wrong when he ruled for Shelly Sterling. This case not only sets dangerous precedence but it allows the real wrong-doer, Donald Sterling, to avoid accountability.

Does Thinking You Are Fatter Make You Fatter?

By Alexis Conason Psy.D. on April 16, 2015 in Eating Mindfully
Many adolescents misperceive their body size; it is not uncommon for normal weight adolescents to categorize themselves as overweight. What is the effect of this misperception of body size?

How The Politics of Memory Affects Us All

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Listen Up!
How our society remembers history affects our sense of identity and well-being. The current controversy about remembering the Vietnam War trickles through families up to the present day, and shapes what kind of future our children will encounter.

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

Sometimes it is impossible to let go of grief. When you continue to grieve a loss, your condition is called complicated grief. Complicated grief is so severe that psychiatrists now consider it for inclusion in the psychiatric manual for diagnosing mental disorders. Here is how to tell if you suffer from complicated grief.

God, Humans, and the 20th Century

By Phil Zuckerman Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in The Secular Life
More humans died from diarrhea than all genocides combined.

Expanding the Heart While Educating the Mind

By Dana Klisanin Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Digital Altruism
The Hippie gene has made its way into the Millennial’s DNA. The “old school” approach to work and education is not right for them. A Millennial would rather be a “freelancer” than a “cog-in-the-wheel” of so-called progress. Their highest aspiration is to become “independent freelancers and global citizens who make a difference in the world.”
Did Dogs Hack the Oxytocin Love Circuit?

Did Dogs Hack the Oxytocin Love Circuit?

A paper published today in the journal Science challenges us to consider whether every study that compares wolves and dogs can shed light on domestication.

Body Punishment

By The Book Brigade on April 16, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Obsessive-compulsive disorder takes many forms, but all of them involve repetitive behaviors that often create vicious cycles of anxiety and shame. Maggie Lamond Simone punished herself to maintain a public face—until the same disorder was diagnosed in her child. Only then did the healing begin.

Dogs, Humans, and the Oxytocin-Mediated Strong Social Bond

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Animal Emotions
A new study has shown that mutual gazing by dogs but not wolves increases oxytocin levels in humans. To demonstrate there was a causal relationship, when oxytocin was administered to a new group of dogs before they interacted with their owners, the researchers saw an increase in the extent of mutual gaze between owners and dogs and an increase in oxytocin in the humans.

Final Exams Are Just Around the Corner

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Head of the Class
Like birth, death, and taxes, finals are inevitable—and always there at the end of term for undergraduates in psychology and all other academic disciplines. How best to prepare for them?

Cash Cowards

Companies are happy to rely on cash cows—products or services that continually attract loyal customers—but when it is time to phase out the cash cows, corporate leaders often lose their nerve. This cowardice afflicts even the high flyers like Kodak, Encyclopedia Brittanica and, in the latest surprising example, Microsoft.

When Women Use Jealousy

By Duana C. Welch Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Love Proof
Common knowledge says jealousy always backfires. Common knowledge is wrong.

What's Your Worst Nightmare?

By E E Smith on April 16, 2015 in Not Born Yesterday
They are the grim subject of several centuries-old paintings, in which a black horse (or "night mare") hovers near a sleeping figure. They have been the terrifying theme of movies, past and present––from "I Wake Up Screaming" (1941), to the latest "Nightmare on Elm Street" flick. So, what exactly is a nightmare?
Can You Really Calm Disturbing Feelings With Just One Word?

Can You Really Calm Disturbing Feelings With Just One Word?

By Meg Selig on April 16, 2015 in Changepower
Can one word calm your agitated feelings? Yes! Try this simple and effective word magic and ease your distress in a nanosecond.