The Latest

Our Top-Down Brains and How They Help Us Adapt to the World

What you see is often not a matter of the stimuli that are in front of you, but a matter of your expectations. The “affair of the dress,” and whether you see it as white-gold or blue-black is just another example of our top-down brains.

ADHD and Early Death: A False Assumption

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on February 28, 2015 in Child in Mind
Space and time to listen to the story are critical to effective treatment of problems of regulation of attention, behavior and emotion. Perhaps the risk of early death in individuals diagnosed with ADHD lies in the absence of recognition and treatment of complex underlying causes.

Gangs: Protecting Today’s Youth - Part One

Gangs are a problem plaguing our nation. While trends show a steady decrease from the past, gangs are still prevalent in many communities throughout the U.S. Unfortunately, many gangs lure susceptible youth into their ranks leading them down a path of criminal activity, drugs and ultimately destruction.

Where’s The Market For Organs (And Sex)?

By Jesse Marczyk on February 28, 2015 in Pop Psych
Sometimes you aren't allowed to sell things that you are free to give away; a curious bit of moral psychology

How (Not) to Win the War on Terrorism

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
How can we protect society against a few committed radicals who can disrupt society by marshaling powerful communications networks? In the good old days, we tracked the movement of physical assets as early warning signs of trouble. What can we do now, when weapons are intangible and untraceable? Might it be possible to mobilize the mainstream as a balancing force?

What Sex Teaches Us About Leadership

Paying attention to sex can make you a better leader

Waldeslust - Joy of the Forest

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in One Among Many
Spending a little time in Nature can break the yoke of self-domestication and bring peace and happiness. Begin with a walk in the woods.

Kick the Bucket List

What is the difference between a bucket list and a five-year plan?

Addiction Speaks

By Abigail Brenner M.D. on February 27, 2015 in In Flux
Addiction comes in many shapes and forms. Not all addictions are alike in their severity and duration. Even those addictions that are less severe and less life-threatening can hold us in its clutches for years on end. This entry includes a letter written to Veronica by her "addict self." What emerges from our own depths and from our own will to heal is often poignant.

On Art And Madness

By Sheila Kohler on February 27, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
My mother would often warn me, “Now Sheila, you don’t want to be too clever for your own good.” Obviously she equated “cleverness” with something dangerous. She was much more interested in how people had reacted to my dress after a party, “Did they like your dress?” she would ask, rather than my report card.

The Bystander Effect

By Rosemary K.M. Sword on February 27, 2015 in The Time Cure
We’d all like to think that when we see something bad happening that we’d step forward to render aid. But in reality most of us don’t. And although some people won’t take the initiative to help, they will take the time to photograph or videotape the event and post it on the internet. Why?

The Girl Who Wanted to be Spock: A Tribute to Leonard Nimoy

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Good Thinking
Spock was stable as a ocean-liner in stormy seas, a place of solace and practicality when crisis hit. He saw things clearly and keenly. And my fascination with him made me become a cognitive scientist.

The Blue/Black White/Gold Dress Controversy: No One Is Right

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in A Logical Take
The blue/black, or white/gold, dress controversy reveals more than meets the eye.

Are Friends Really Worth That Much?

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Creating in Flow
Have you ever reflected on the role of female friends in your own life? Do you maintain lifelong friendships? If not, do you wish you could?

4 Keys to Great Sex

By Kimberly Key on February 27, 2015 in Counseling Keys
Sex with the wrong partner can have deleterious effects on your self-esteem. Learn the four keys to an awesome sex life.

Winning Moves in "Searching for Bobby Fischer"

By Skip Dine Young Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Movies and the Mind
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" is a movie about greatness in chess. But more than that, it is about maintaining compassion as one pursues excellence. It is also a caution to parents who may be tempted to overly identify with their children's success.

Intimate Partner Abuse: Walk Away Before the Cycle Starts

We should never live in fear of the people who say they love us.

Schizophrenia and Violence, Part II

By Betsy Seifter Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in After the Diagnosis
The insanity defense fails again, but mentally ill offenders need treatment, not punishment.

Sexting and Selfies

Sexting and intimate selfies have become almost routine-but should they be?

Does Neuroimaging Provide the Ultimate Answers?

By Daniel Voyer Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Perceptual Asymmetries
Does the state of knowledge and methodology on neuroimaging warrant the confidence we have on results obtained with these methods?

Is Your Job Ruining Your Marriage?

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in The Squeaky Wheel
Most of us have had the impulse to yell at our boss or even burst into tears at work—but we typically don’t, because we don’t want to get fired. But suppressing our emotions at work can have a big impact on our home lives. Here's why:

Why We Hate It When People Invade Our Space

By Joe Navarro M.A. on February 27, 2015 in Spycatcher
Why exercising social intelligence matters and why it can dominate a news cycle

#WhatColorIsTheDress

By Maureen Seaberg on February 27, 2015 in Sensorium
Tetrachromats should have the deciding vote in the #WhatColorIsTheDress debate.

Why You Were Born to Gossip

By David Ludden Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Talking Apes
Since our brains are finely tuned for coordinating our relationships with others, it’s not surprising that language is structured to convey social information.

Why SeaWorld Can’t Float: Censorship and Business Ethics

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Animal Emotions
SeaWorld attempted to censor talks at the 14th International Conference of the American Cetacean Society (ACS) last November that criticized them in the areas of the ethics of captivity and their business practices. Dr. Thomas White, who was one of the presenters being closeted, has now posted his presentation for all to see. It's well worth the time to view and share it.
Why the "Eat Less, Move More" Approach Often Fails

Why the "Eat Less, Move More" Approach Often Fails

Why the "Eat Less, Move More" Approach Often Fails. Not all calories are the same, By Susan Kolod, Ph.D.

3 Fascinating Ways To Improve Your Wellbeing

When it comes to improving your wellbeing, what would you be willing to try? With studies suggesting, more than seventy percent of people around the world report they are struggling or suffering, as they face into each day ahead it’s clear many of us need a little extra help when it comes to thriving. So where does the science suggest starting?

Living in the Here and Now

By Susan Hooper on February 26, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
For most of my life, I have wanted to be somewhere else, living an entirely different life. A calendar from years ago showed me that I had then—and may even have now—a life that other people might envy.

Should We Fan the Romantic Flame?

By Aaron Ben-Zeév Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in In the Name of Love
All human experiences, including romantic ones, can be boring. The remedy for boredom is often change and novelty. Should we then change our romantic partners in order to fan our romantic flames? Although change is indeed essential to emotional intensity, there are several types of changes, and emotional intensity is far from being the whole story when it comes to romance.

How People Quit Being High Maintenance

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Ambigamy
Holding our heads high is good an necessary, but higher than other heads is exhausting both for us and the people who have to deal with us. Here's an alternative.