The Latest

Developing Good Study Habits Really Works

By Art Markman Ph.D. on February 27, 2012 in Ulterior Motives
Knowledge is the essence of smart thinking. No matter how much raw intelligence you have, you are not going to succeed at solving complex problems without knowing a lot.

Why Does God Allow Evil?

By Michael W. Austin Ph.D. on February 27, 2012 in Ethics for Everyone
The existence of evil and suffering is a philosophical and existential problem for those who believe in God. In this post, I discuss some responses that have been given by those who maintain faith in the midst of evil and suffering.

Addiction and Afghanistan, Volkow and Obama

By Stanton Peele on February 27, 2012 in Addiction in Society
Americans pride themselves on tapping into bedrock values and realities, like the universality of representative national governments and addiction as a brain disease. Both ideas are cultural delusions.

Are You Your Own Person?

To be happy, said John Stuart Mill, you need to be your own person. But what exactly does this mean? And how do you personally measure up? These are questions I want to address in this blog.

Fans of Fans

I recently watched a documentary about Harry Potter fans called "We Are Wizards." I'm afraid I can't recommend the film, it's pretty incoherent. But it was also fascinating in a disturbing sort of way, because it depicted a type of behavior I've never really noticed before: fans of fans.

Would You Be Nice to a Chauvinist Pig?

Imagine you are in a meeting at school or at work, and someone blurts out a clearly chauvinist or bigoted remark. Ask yourself: how would you respond? Would you put them in their place, or would you be too nice to confront?

What Did He Say?

By Francois Grosjean Ph.D. on February 27, 2012 in Life as a Bilingual
Some tongue in cheek reflections on Jean Dujardin's bilingual acceptance speech at the Oscars.

How Do Executives Survive?

By Carl Beuke Ph.D. on February 27, 2012 in You're Hired
Life as a senior manager is harder than most people think. Long hours, crushing workloads, multiple and constant pressures, and incessant conflict and unpopularity often come with the job. Yet executives are typically healthier and happier than the rest of us. How do they do it?

Adolescence and the Harm of Asking

"There's no harm in asking," said the parent, trying to encourage her high school junior to pose his question. "With all that's been going on, maybe the teacher will give you an extension on the paper and not grade you down for being late. What do you have to lose by asking?" That shows how little parents know. Asking for an adolescent can be risky business.

The Truth About America's Religious Heritage

By David Niose on February 27, 2012 in Our Humanity, Naturally
Is America's "religious heritage" a justification for the regular assertion of religious truth claims by the government?

The Impatient Heart: Is It Indeed Now or Never?

By Aaron Ben-Zeév Ph.D. on February 26, 2012 in In the Name of Love
The romantic heart is typically described as impatient—“It’s now or never. Tomorrow will be too late.” It is assumed that it is not natural to postpone satisfaction in matters concerning love. Contrary to this popular assumption, there are many circumstances in which the romantic heart can be very patient.

Encouraging Failure: Why Perfection Is Not Perfect

By Christopher Taibbi M.A.T. on February 26, 2012 in Gifted-Ed Guru
Recovery from failure is what encourages risk-taking. Recovering from failure encourages growth.

Deborah Henry: Author Struggles with Letting Go

By Jennifer Haupt on February 26, 2012 in One True Thing
"Publishing a novel and letting go of characters can be like sending children out into the world."—Deborah Henry

Don't Shake Hands

By Alex Lickerman M.D. on February 26, 2012 in Happiness in this World
One of the earliest memories I have is of my father teaching me how to shake hands. He would always comment to me whenever he received what he considered to be the hallmark of a quality handshake, a firm grip. Handshakes, he taught me, were important.

Picking Yourself Up After a Fall

By Susan R Barry Ph.D. on February 26, 2012 in Eyes on the Brain
A young musician tells an inspiring story.

Psychology, Hope and the Reversal of Chronic Disease and Aging

By Susan Biali M.D. on February 26, 2012 in Prescriptions for Life
Chronic diseases like Diabetes and Heart Disease are often viewed by patients and doctors as a life sentence—a tragedy, when we know so much about the reversibility of these conditions. With help from the Cleveland Clinic's Dr. Michael Roizen, Wellness Expert Dr. Susan Biali, M.D. discusses the power of psychology and hope for these patients.

Deacon Don and His Broken Neck Boys: Resilience in Action

By Mark Matousek on February 26, 2012 in Ethical Wisdom
The Broken Neck Boys of Chicago are teaching the rest of us how to live.

9 Practical Tips If You're Home Alone

By Irene S Levine Ph.D. on February 26, 2012 in The Friendship Doctor
I am 63. My husband brought me here many years ago. It is rural and here, family is everything—which is nice—but I have none. My life from the beginning was similar to a child in an orphanage. I was cared for by someone, I guess, but never had any modeling for family. There was no love, no touching, no hugging and no intimacy.

Things You Must Never Say Aloud

By Jen Kim on February 26, 2012 in Valley Girl With a Brain
Sure, there's the list of words we can't say on national television. But what about the bad words we tell ourselves? Stop harming your self-esteem and your future and cut these vocabulary words from your conversations.

Are Today's 20-Somethings Slackers?

By Nancy Darling Ph.D. on February 26, 2012 in Thinking About Kids
Media reports abound with portraits of young adults mooching off their overly protective parents. Is it true? Or is something else really going on?

Five Causes of Belief in God

By Nathan A Heflick Ph.D. on February 26, 2012 in The Big Questions
What are the real causes of belief in the supernatural?

Why Bad Things Can Be Done in Religion's Name

By Arthur Dobrin D.S.W. on February 26, 2012 in Am I Right?
Only the strictest pacifist understands the commandment not to kill to mean no taking of human life under any circumstances; only a psychopath thinks that killing doesn't need justification.

The You Behind Your Resume

While there's nothing wrong with taking pride in one's hard-earned status and credentials, glomming on to titles that complete sentences like "I am a ________________" (stockbroker, lawyer, etc.) can trigger an identity crisis when confronted with precarious life circumstances like, say, a recession.