The Latest

I Hate Multiple Choice

What do multiple choice tests measure? Is that what we want to know?

7 Ways Mentally Strong People Combat Stress

While stress causes some people to crumble, mentally strong people continue to thrive in the midst of added tension.

Do You Know What You Need?

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
Recent research shows that people differ in how well they recognize their own needs, which has important implications for relationships and well-being. Find out how to identify your needs.

Break Out of Your Boredom

People can feel imprisoned by their boredom. They are stuck in feeling restless and unmotivated with no hope of finding freedom. But there is a way out. Much like any prison break, your way out is to begin by tunneling down.

Resolving the “Conscientiousness Paradox”

Conscientious individuals generally have good outcomes, but countries with high national levels of conscientiousness generally have poorer levels of human development. What does this apparent "conscientiousness paradox" mean?

Does Sex and Violence Really Sell Products?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in Media Spotlight
The widespread belief that sex and violence will sell products helps explain why this kind of media programming is so popular. But is this really the case? A new review of fifty years of research studies into the effectiveness of sex and violence in advertisements suggests that advertisers need to rethink the kind of message they send.

The Most Annoying Mistake Anxious People Make Every Day

Everyone wants to be heard. There's nothing wrong with wanting people to know your opinions, or how you feel. However, you may be driving others away when you open your mouth. Learn how to sharpen your communication skills and feel less stress and more calm and inner-peace.

Life in the Mushpot

By Bernard L. De Koven on July 27, 2015 in On Having Fun
Sometimes it's OK when you don't get to play. Sometimes, not so much.

Seeing the Person Within the Persona

Irrelationship is about a lot of things: a co-created and shared defense, compulsive caregiving, Performing and Audiencing, suffering and feeling trapped and helpless. It is also about hiding out in a routine, a song-and-dance routine. That routine is like a mask that protects the self from observation—it is a persona-in-action (an enacted disguise).

Psych Write: Psychology Can Make Sense and Be Fun to Read!

Authors trying to write about psychology for general audiences may err by writing the same way they would write journal articles, or they may err by writing too casually. These tips can help students, psych pros, journalists, bloggers, and water cooler conversationalists achieve the right balance while clearly talking about psychology. Jargon is good. Really, it is.
Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Stories of Seclusion: After Winning the Lottery

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in How To Do Life
The drive to be creative can know no bounds.

Memory, Body Language and Personality in Soccer

By Ben Lyttleton on July 27, 2015 in Twelve Yards
USA lost its Gold Cup soccer play-off to Panama on penalties - but could the team have avoided defeat?

Abnormal Behaviour – What Does It Really Mean?

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in A Sideways View
Most people like to think that they are "normal". But what does it mean to be normal? And if you are not normal does that mean you are abnormal?

News stories with the power of empathy

Depicting physical pain and discomfort may make for compelling journalism, but it also could undermine audiences' empathetic responses and perpetuate what neuroscientists call the 'empathy gap.' Instead, efforts to capture people's emotional suffering may be more likely to evoke empathy, even though that's much trickier for reporters trained to 'show, don't tell.'

8 Ways to Bust Your Creative Blocks at Work

By Megan Dalla-Camina on July 26, 2015 in Real Women
Creativity at work can be stifled, especially during really busy or stressful times. Try these strategies to bust your blocks and get your creative juices flowing.
The Excellent Beauty of Scientific Mysteries

The Excellent Beauty of Scientific Mysteries

By Eric Dietrich Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Excellent Beauty
Science finally reveals that though we are a part of the universe, it definitely does not revolve around us. It does this by unearthing mysteries that are completely resistant to resolution. These "excellent beauties," far from showing us where science has failed, show us instead what the universe -- with intelligent African apes in it -- is really like.
Heroin Abuse is on our Doorstep

Heroin Abuse is on our Doorstep

Of course, I see it every day because I work in the addiction treatment field, but increasingly, families that never thought they’d be touched by substance abuse or addiction are having just that experience.

Summer Camp and Disruptive Moments

By Steve Baskin on July 26, 2015 in S'mores and More
Former summer campers often describe their experiences as "life changing", despite the fact that they spend far less time at camp than home or school. This article discusses one reason that camps have a disproportionate impact on the children they serve.

Cheating Yourself? I Hear the Advice, I Do What I Want

Real behaviour change is not about willpower, or stages of change, but about satisfying wants and dealing with needs along the way.......it is about coherence at all levels of the person......

Puns and the Aging Process

By Richard Smith Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Joy and Pain
The question of what makes a good pun depends on the age of the punster and the expectations associated with age. There is lesson in this for all inveterate punsters as they "mature."

Adam Lanza's First Psychotic Episode

By Peter Langman Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Keeping Kids Safe
We cannot understand Adam Lanza without taking into account his apparent schizophrenia.

Baby Crying? Don't Shame the Parents!

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
A medical doctor, also a parent, wrote to me recently to complain about my blog post, "'Dangers of Crying it Out.'" Here is (most of) my response.

The Archeology of Misbehavior

Archeology is the study of human activity in the past. The archeology of misbehavior is studying current behavior to uncover hidden sources. The “ruins” of misdeeds are built upon personality architecture and cultural landscapes.
Changing Clocks Causes Cancer?

Changing Clocks Causes Cancer?

Time rules life. Does disrupting inner body clocks cause cancer?

10 Signs You’re Dating a Narcissist

The Mayo Clinic research group defines narcissistic personality disorder as “a mental disorder in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance and a deep need for admiration. How do you know when you’re dating a narcissist? Here are ten telltale signs...

An Invaluable Lesson From Elders

Although suffering in life is inevitable, we can mitigate it.

Will Individual Investors Succeed with Equity Crowdfunding?

Equity crowdfunding is less than two years old in the United States and is just starting to take off. It offers a lot of promise and peril to individual investors and an exciting new phenomenon for psychology researchers to study.

Dumped Without An Explanation: Is There Anything To Do?

A woman feels dumped without explanation by her close friend and wonders how to move on.