Punk Music Isn't "Bad"

Extreme music can help regulate emotions (if you like it)

Creative Concerns

Uncertainty and bias against creative ideas

Things Not to Say to a New Widow

Five phrases to avoid

Hunting Bwana the Dentist

What fantasies move a man to ambush an elderly tourist lion?

You May Not Persist Long Enough in Creative Tasks

More effort generating creative ideas is generally rewarded.

Can Artificial Intelligence Make Us Stupid?

With intelligent machines to do the thinking, will our brains get lazy?

The Latest

The Psychological Appeal of Donald Trump

Like Peter Finch in the movie Network and like the American public, Trump is "mad (and rich) as hell and not going to take it anymore!"

Berkeley's Harmful Pandering to Fear of Cell Phone Radiation

Berkeley has required cell phone retailers to warn shoppers of a health risk from cell phone radiation, despite overwhelming evidence that no such risk exists. Policy making pandering to fear is dangerous in and of itself

Be Yourself, Act Yourself, and Be a Hero

By Ran Zilca on July 30, 2015 in Confessions of a Techie
The first step on this “heroic journey”, to be a hero for your children, spouse, friends, or coworkers, is simply to know who you are.

What's the Matter With "All Lives Matter"

Some white folks have responded to the phrase "Black Lives Matter" with the phrase “All Lives Matter.” While this is a seemingly more empowering and diversity affirming response, it is neither. Here's why.

Punk Music Isn't "Bad"

New research explores whether extreme music (e.g. heavy metal and punk) makes you angrier, or helps you process and regulate your anger.

Book Review: "Drop the Worry Ball"

When children experience fearful situations, they have the opportunity to cope with challenges, which increases their long term resilience.

An Unexpected Chord

Disagreement don't need to poison relationships

Want to Improve Your Cognitive Abilities? Go Climb a Tree!

A new study has discovered that physical activities, such as climbing a tree or balancing on a beam, can dramatically improve cognitive abilities. Why would climbing a tree improve cognitive function and working memory?

The Playful Adult

By Bernard L. De Koven on July 30, 2015 in On Having Fun
...adults are playful beings, just like we children are...when it comes to needing to play, we might very well be more play deprived than they.

Betrayal and Abandonment in Therapy

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on July 30, 2015 in The Me in We
When sudden death, suicide, or a sexual advance shatters the clinical alliance.

Creative Concerns

At first glance, the notion that creativity perturbs us is oxymoronic. We live in an age in which we are encouraged to prize all things ingenious. However, novelty also brings risk and uncertainty.

Addressing Your "Laziness"

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 30, 2015 in How To Do Life
Ostensible laziness can be caused by any of five factors, each with its own cure.
6 Affirmations for Postpartum Self-Esteem

6 Affirmations for Postpartum Self-Esteem

It’s just that your pretense is not as well developed and you are not as good at faking it as they are.

Liar, Liar, Working Memory on Fire

Working Memory can make you a better liar, research shows

Codependency in Five Easy Lessons

Codependency can be confusing for people in a relationship with someone who has an addiction to alcohol, drugs or compulsive behaviors. Here is a simple way to understand what is going on and avoid the pitfalls.
Things Not to Say to a New Widow

Things Not to Say to a New Widow

It's best to avoid these five phrases.

You Don’t Need to Have Racism in Your Heart to be a Racist

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in More Than Mortal
In order to combat racism people need to understand that racism can exist without deeply held racist beliefs. Racist behavior is not always the result of conscious deliberation.

New Empirical Research on Dream Recall and Content

These new articles in the journal Dreaming show the importance of taking age, culture, and external threats into account when trying to understand the nature and functions of dreams in people’s lives.

Self-Harm Websites and Teens Who Visit Them

By Michele Ybarra MPH, Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in Connected
A very small percent of youth visit websites about self-harm. But on the Internet, followings on one self-harm site can number in the thousands. Are these sites harmful for youth who visit them, or do they provide some social support?

Hunting Bwana the Dentist

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in A Swim in Denial
What would motivate a dentist to spend $55,000 to kill an elderly tourist lion? The answer takes us on a psychological safari looking at recent themes in American life that incite and reward fantasies of the mighty hunter.

Why Your Creative Friends and Co-Workers Can Be So Deceptive

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in Social Instincts
New research explores the connection between creativity and unethical behavior.

Teaching Through Insights

What would it look like to view teaching as a process of creating insights? Here are 6 ideas: diagnosing why students are confused, helping students unlearn mistaken beliefs, encouraging students to pursue their own feedback, anticipating knowledge shields and breaking through them, working through the three pathways to insight, and promoting an insight stance.

Serving Your Self-Interest for Good

By Kathy Cramer Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in Lead Positive
Find out from renowned women's success coach why navigating the politics of an organization is critical to getting promoted.

How to Stop Choking Under Pressure

By Jonathan Fader Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in The New You
Every athlete in the world, at one time or another, has choked under pressure. Sometimes, athletes are able to bounce back. Other times, a botched play can haunt an athlete for the rest of his or her career.

The Problem with Investigation Before Examination

There is a systematic flaw within the practice of U.S. medicine in which doctors require an investigation of medical issues prior to an examination to increase profitability.

Sherlock Holmes: The Case of Memory and Aging

Sherlock Holmes is the quintessential detective, but what happens to his memory and his mind in old age? The new movie Mr. Holmes, as well as current research on cognitive aging, allow for an important case study on memory and aging.

Fear and Anxiety Affect the Health and Life Span of Dogs

Research shows that increased levels of certain types of fearfulness in dogs may be associated higher susceptibility to skin diseases and to reduced life span.

Cat Lovers In Denial

By Arthur Dobrin D.S.W. on July 29, 2015 in Am I Right?
Love wears rose-colored glasses and that ain't good.

You May Not Persist Long Enough in Creative Tasks

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
I have the opportunity to work with groups who are trying to develop creative solutions to problems. One thing I have noticed is that groups often try to end the task of generating new potential solutions fairly quickly. After they have generated a couple of good ideas, they want to move on to evaluating those ideas and planning a way to execute those ideas.

Is Ghosting the New Norm?

By Jen Kim on July 29, 2015 in Valley Girl With a Brain
Ghosting occurs when the person you are dating suddenly disappears off the face of the planet. This can take the form of ignoring you, not responding to any attempts at communication and even pretending they legitimately don’t know you, even when you see them face-to-face. As the term suggests, they've vanished without a trace.