Has a Universal Preference Just Been Challenged?

Universal preferences and the expected variance in them

The Science of Betrayal

This is your brain on betrayal

Gossip in Your Workplace Probably Does More Good Than Harm

Gossip is a social skill, NOT a character flaw; it is essential to work life.

Don't Aim for Happiness

Melancholy can't be avoided.

How I'm Using Science to Help My Daughter Keep Liking Math

Priming studies show uphill battle for girls and math, and how to help

Hate Small Talk? It’s a Skill Worth Learning

5 Ways to Make Conversation about Unimportant Things

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Foucault and Me

Two very similar titles. Two very different perspectives on the history of insanity.

The Personality Transplant

By Erica Sonnenburg Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in The Good Gut
There is an information super highway that connects our brain and our gut called the brain-gut axis. Recent evidence indicates that our gut microbes are tapping into this axis and influencing our brain and behavior.

Life is Beautiful?

He hit me about the head with newspaper and yelled furiously at me. I am five years old. It is one of the most wonderful memories of my life.
The Social Pain of Rejection

The Social Pain of Rejection

By Amy Banks on April 26, 2015 in Wired For Love
SPOT theory confirms that people who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones – but it also tells us that we all live in glass houses.

Real Psychiatry and Darwinian Evolution are One and the Same

The basic principle for the development of human personality is at one with Darwinian evolution. Psychotherapy is the treatment that addresses the human issues in precisely the way they were constructed in the first place.

How to Win at Rock-Paper-Scissors

Don't be the one who has to wash the dishes, do push-ups, or pay for lunch. Winning at Rock - Paper - Scissors is about psychology, not chance.

What Would Optimus Prime Do?

Leaders of the Autobots and Decepticons are used to illustrate how schemas about leadership concepts are influenced by popular media. Understanding these schemas can help educate people about leadership and followership. Knowing the answer to "What would Optimus Prime Do?" could help leaders be more selfless and effective.

Kids and Animals Helping One Another at Green Chimneys

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in Animal Emotions
I just returned home from a most inspiring conference called "Growing Together: Kids, Animals and Sowing the Seeds of Resiliency" held at Green Chimneys in Brewster, New York. This interdisciplinary gathering on human-animal interaction shows how much can be done for the kids and the animals who in many ways rescue, help, and heal one another. Green Chimneys rocks!

Has a Universal Preference Just Been Challenged?

By Jesse Marczyk on April 26, 2015 in Pop Psych
A new paper seeks to challenge the assertion that the preference for women's waist-to-hip ratio is universal and invariant

Changes in the Family: Impact on Child Relationships

Single parenting carries many responsibilities, not least of which is an even greater need to support children in their understanding for healthy relationships.

Is it Food Allergy, Food Intolerance, or Restrictive Eating?

Do you bloat after eating certain foods? It might be food intolerance.

The Wisdom of Our Elders

Good news: we can employ ordinary measures for mood improvement and to fight against anxiety, depression, and stress. My conclusion from working with nursing home residents is that feeling better does not usually require a miracle, just careful management of the mundane elements of our lives.

My Sunday Morning With Mental Health Advocates

I wanted to spend our time hearing the thoughts of those who attended, families and patients, about they believed stood in the way of improving mental health services and what we could do about it

Sitting Can Drain Brain Power and Stifle Creativity

Sitting has become an epidemic. Not only does sitting increase health risks and obesity—sitting can also stifle creative thinking and disrupt cognitive engagement.

Do You Have the Personality of a Neanderthal?

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Almost all of us have some Neanderthal in us. What can that tell us about how these ancient cousins of ours thought?

The Science of Betrayal

A betrayal by someone you trust is one of the most challenging interpersonal situations you can face in life. Whether through infidelity or a failure to fulfill a promise, betrayal leads to a desire for revenge, particularly in some people. New neuroscience research suggests who’s most likely to be hurt by a betrayal and why.

10 Signs Your Co-Worker / Colleague is a Narcissist

The Mayo Clinic research group defines narcissistic personality disorder as “a mental disorder in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance. At the workplace, a pathologically narcissistic co-worker can be annoying and frustrating at best, and a serious threat to your career at worst. Here are ten signs that your colleague might be a narcissist...

The Advantages of Being an Outsider

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in A Sideways View
Most people are members of some minority group. Rather than seeing this as a disadvantage there are reasons to believe it can give people valuable insights and skills.

What Women and Men Do with their Hands

A single behavior can have multiple meanings in different cultures and can get us in trouble! For instance, the ring gesture (the circle created by the thumb touching the index finger) with which Americans convey “Okay,” means “You are a zero” in France and Belgium.

8 Myths About Creativity

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Creating in Flow
Admit it: we all have more than enough excuses and rationalizations for why we aren't doing the creative work we claim to value. Could creative myths be contributing to your procrastination?

What Explains the Apparent Increase in Bad Manners?

By Gad Saad Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Homo Consumericus
Many people lament the apparent rise of bad manners in contemporary online and offline settings. In her latest book "Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*uck" Amy Alkon offers some practical solutions to the onslaught of daily boorish behaviors.

Your 6th Sense

Scientific reasons why you can trust "extrasensory" perceptions

The Latest Social Anxiety Cure: Become Invisible!

Technology can be used to create the illusion that your body is completely invisible to yourself and others. Experiments show that this reduces social anxiety in stressful social situations. This finding may lead to exciting new treatment strategies.

16 Breaking up Tips and How Journaling Eases Heartbreak

Research tells us that writing about the positive aspects of the relationship has healing value.

Gossip in Your Workplace Probably Does More Good Than Harm

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
Campaigns to stamp out workplace gossip overlook the fact that gossip is part of who we are and an essential part of what makes work groups function as well as they do. It is more productive to think of gossip as a social skill rather than as a character flaw, because it is only when we do not do it well that we get into trouble.
7 Core Values for Writers

7 Core Values for Writers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
In light of a recent business survey, I found values expressed by successful businesses that can also benefit the literary trade.

Why the Bruce Jenner Interview Matters

How will the transgender movement for rights be impacted by the Bruce Jenner interview?

How to Prepare for Life Changes

By Abigail Brenner M.D. on April 25, 2015 in In Flux
Change is inevitable. Sometimes change comes about that we need to respond to and this may require putting our own plans on hold. Sometimes we decide that we need to change course in our lives because what we had been doing is not working for us. Here are some basic points and tools to help us prepare for change.
What Is the Optimally Efficient Gap Between Study Sessions?

What Is the Optimally Efficient Gap Between Study Sessions?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Memory Medic
Learning success depends on when you study.