The Neuroscience of Betrayal

This is your brain on betrayal

Don't Aim for Happiness

Melancholy Can't Be Avoided and if You Try It Will Be Worse

How I'm Using Science to Help My Daughter Keep Liking Math

Priming studies show uphill battle for girls and math, and how to help

Hate Small Talk? It’s a Skill Worth Learning

5 Ways to Make Conversation about Unimportant Things

The Grass Moment

We Need to Help Kids Become "Reflective Rebels"

5 Ways to Heal a Broken Heart

... including the truth about rebound relationships.

The Latest

The Advantages of Being an Outsider

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in A Sideways View
Most people are members of some minority group. Rather than seeing this as a disadvantage there are reasons to believe it can give people insights and skills that make them particularly valuable to have in any group.

What Women and Men Do with their Hands

A single behavior can have multiple meanings in different cultures and can get us in trouble! For instance, the ring gesture (the circle created by the thumb touching the index finger) with which Americans convey “Okay,” means “You are a zero” in France and Belgium.

8 Myths About Creativity

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Creating in Flow
Admit it: we all have more than enough excuses and rationalizations for why we aren't doing the creative work we claim to value. Could creative myths be contributing to your procrastination?

What Explains the Apparent Increase in Bad Manners?

By Gad Saad Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Homo Consumericus
Many people lament the apparent rise of bad manners in contemporary online and offline settings. In her latest book "Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*uck" Amy Alkon offers some practical solutions to the onslaught of daily boorish behaviors.

Your 6th Sense

Scientific reasons why you can trust "extrasensory" perceptions

The Latest Social Anxiety Cure: Become Invisible!

Technology can be used to create the illusion that your body is completely invisible to yourself and others. Experiments show that this reduces social anxiety in stressful social situations. This finding may lead to exciting new treatment strategies.

16 Breaking up Tips and How Journaling Eases Heartbreak

Even if ending the relationship was your wish,prepare for an empty feeling inside. When you have had the talk, instead of recounting feelings of anger, wish your partner joy. Research tells us that writing about the positive aspects of the relationship has healing value.

Gossip in Your Workplace Probably Does More Good Than Harm

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
Campaigns to stamp out workplace gossip overlook the fact that gossip is part of who we are and an essential part of what makes work groups function as well as they do. It is more productive to think of gossip as a social skill rather than as a character flaw, because it is only when we do not do it well that we get into trouble.
7 Core Values for Writers

7 Core Values for Writers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
In light of a recent business survey, I found values expressed by successful businesses that can also benefit the literary trade.

Why the Bruce Jenner Interview Matters

How will the transgender movement for rights be impacted by the Bruce Jenner interview?

How to Prepare for Life Changes

By Abigail Brenner M.D. on April 25, 2015 in In Flux
Change is inevitable. Sometimes change comes about that we need to respond to and this may require putting our own plans on hold. Sometimes we decide that we need to change course in our lives because what we had been doing is not working for us. Here are some basic points and tools to help us prepare for change.
What is the optimally efficient gap between study sessions?

What is the optimally efficient gap between study sessions?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Memory Medic
Learning success depends on when you study.

Aerobic Activity vs. Weight Lifting: Which Burns More Fat?

A combination of strength training, aerobic exercise, and reducing caloric intake is a winning formula for weight loss. However, there is one important caveat.

Peanut Butter is My Gateway Drug

By Gregg McBride on April 25, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
Taking the taboo and shame out of a binge can help shed light—and perhaps even some laughter—onto the addictive habits that might be holding us back from finding forgiveness, compassion and (ultimately) success.

The Neuroscience of Betrayal

A betrayal by someone you trust is one of the most challenging interpersonal situations you can face in life. Whether through infidelity or a failure to fulfill a promise, betrayal leads to a desire for revenge, particularly in some people. New neuroscience research suggests who’s most likely to be hurt by a betrayal and why.

Don't Aim for Happiness

Loss and melancholy cannot be avoided. Poetry assists acceptance better than manuals of happiness.

Spinster is the New Black

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Living Single
Single people are having a moment. Articles are popping up everywhere about ways of living fully and joyfully outside of marriage and nuclear families. Suddenly, spinster is the new black. The question is, who gets to wear it?

Keep Your Body Tuned Up

Body is complicated machine

Ménage à Trois: Sex, Dementia and the Law

By Mario D Garrett PhD on April 24, 2015 in iAge
The law will need to re-evaluate the legal standing of someone with dementia. The crude methods of conservatorship and declaration of incompetence cannot deal with the fragile nature of relationships, and sexual relationship, among patients diagnosed with dementia.

How I'm Using Science to Help My Daughter Keep Liking Math

By Garth Sundem on April 24, 2015 in Brain Candy
My 5-year-old daughter loves math and I'm terrified this fall when she starts kindergarten, she could lose that love. Priming studies show that girls are still on the receiving end of negative math stereotypes. But knowing the challenge might also point to a solution. I sure hope so...

The Problem With People-Pleasing

By Kristi Pikiewicz PhD on April 24, 2015 in Meaningful You
Do you bend over backwards to make everyone else happy? Then why are you so lonely? Here's why being a people pleaser is a losing long-term strategy.

The Social Layers of TV and Film Fandom

How is watching your favorite show a form of "social media"?
How A Health Crisis Becomes A Gift

How A Health Crisis Becomes A Gift

A health crisis or any personal roadblock can feel overwhelming, make you angry or frustrated. But, let's look how to turn it into an opportunity.

The Secret to Well-Being

Finding one's happiness is each individual’s personal adventure, but research can provide some guidance. Find out what science tells us is the key to finding your happiness and learn the five essential elements that lead to well-being.

Sex with Animals

Is zoophilia, or sexual attraction to animals, a sexual orientation? Or is it a perversion? And is it possible to engage in zoo-sex without causing harm?

Changing Minds

By Susan R Barry Ph.D. on April 24, 2015 in Eyes on the Brain
Can a few hours of watching a 3D movie overcome a lifetime of deficient stereovision? Just how plastic is the adult brain?

Using Time-Outs: Top 5 Mistakes Parents Make

Time-outs do not cause brain damage and are an effective strategy to reduce negative behavior in children. However, they can easily be used in less than optimal ways. Keeping in mind these 5 common errors can help parents get the most out of this valuable technique.

How to be Healthy: Grandma’s Advice May Be Best After All!

We live in a fast-paced world, and new wellness information comes out constantly. Each day, a new list of foods to have and to avoid gets published, dismissing what was said before. But if we look closer at current trends, we find that many health practices from 100 years ago still have a lot of intrinsic value today. Turns out grandma's advice may be the best after all.

Hate Small Talk? It’s a Skill Worth Learning

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on April 24, 2015 in Off the Couch
Do you hate small talk? You’re not alone, of course. Maybe you’re shy, or introverted, or maybe you’re bored by it. Or do you get irritated by the apparently endless and meaningless chatter? Here are 5 reasons to change your mind. And 5 techniques for getting better at it.