Is Depression Hereditary?

Working to better understand depression through the science of epigenetics.

Three Tricks to Find Your Flow

When was the last time you were so focused that time stood still?

When Food Is Medicine

Asking about diet can improve outcomes in depression

Getting to the Source

Confessions of a Replication Scientist

Why You Shouldn’t Give Friends Unsolicited Love Advice

Unwanted advice is more likely to harm than help the recipient.

Now You See It, Now You Don’t: The Many Faces of Narcissism

It’s time for narcissism to be “rebranded”—enter "Rethinking Narcissism."

The Latest

Punishing the Innocent

Our "get-tough-on-crime" policies are needlessly vindictive to the children of incarcerated parents. That's mean-spirited--and short-sighted.

Want a Release? Myofascial Release Gave Me a New Body

If you're feeling tight and out of kilter, don't assume the problem is outside of you. Your fascia connect up every cell in your body and if they are stuck, you are stuck. You can feel good now by releasing your fascia.

Is Depression Hereditary?

Depression is one of the most common and serious illnesses in the world, but sadly also the most mysterious. However, we can garner important information by studying depression in families.

When College Shopping, Don't Forget About Mental Health

How well a school responds to its students’ mental health needs can be literally lifesaving, and that’s not just for the students already dealing with concerns such as anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and substance abuse. Many mental health issues first emerge in early adulthood, and college - with its stresses, competition and disconnect from familiar support network
Three Tricks to Find Your Flow

Three Tricks to Find Your Flow

By Christine L Carter Ph.D. on September 03, 2015 in Raising Happiness
Athletes call this mental state being in “The Zone”; psychologists call it “flow” or peak experience, and they have linked it to leading a life of happiness and purpose.

Charlie: The Feral Dog Who Came in From the Wild

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on September 03, 2015 in Animal Emotions
A new book about a feral dog called "Charlie: The Dog Who Came in From the Wild" by Lisa Tenzin-Dolma shows the importance of shared trust, love, and deep commitment when one chooses to live with a "difficult dog" who came to the author with very special needs that could only be satisfied by a very special human being. This is a most important book for humans and dogs.

My Boyfriend Died Because I Failed to Make a Phone Call

By Temma Ehrenfeld on September 03, 2015 in Open Gently
Is his privacy more important than his life?

The Runaway Train in Our Heads

By Kaja Perina on September 03, 2015 in Brainstorm
Part of the nature of obsession is that you cannot easily obtain sufficient distance from it: The thoughts, worries, and compulsions feel utterly overwhelming.

The Nature and Consequences of Noise Sensitivity in Dogs

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 03, 2015 in Canine Corner
Recent data suggests that noise sensitivity in dogs may be based upon genetic and physiological factors and may also predict separation anxiety, fearfulness in novel situations, and even some age-related changes in stress responses.

What Is the Female Social Code?

By Barbara Greenberg Ph.D. on September 03, 2015 in The Teen Doctor
How To Handle Complicated Friend/Boyfriend Situations

A Pilot Fearful During Flight as a Passenger

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on September 03, 2015 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
A pilot writes, "I understand all of the concepts of flying and the safety relating to it. This is not my problem. I’m afraid only when I’m a passenger. It’s the feeling of not being in control. Also, my fear fear is associated with the plane’s movements, and not knowing if a turn is coming or when it is coming."

Travels in Vietnam and Cambodia and a Lesson in Resilience

By Sydney Engelberg PhD on September 03, 2015 in The Practical Professor
What could be more exotic than travelling around Vietnam and Cambodia? But what about the Killing Fields and the Vietnam War? Turns out the answer is surprisingly encouraging.

5 Reasons This Isn't Your Grandfather's Psychoanalysis

By Kristi Pikiewicz PhD on September 03, 2015 in Meaningful You
The image that many people have of psychoanalysis is from the 1950's or even earlier. Times change. And so has psychoanalysis.

When Food Is Medicine

By Emily Deans M.D. on September 03, 2015 in Evolutionary Psychiatry
Doctors designed the dietary intervention of this study of older adults because they thought it wouldn't impact mental health compared to psychotherapy. They were in for a big mood-brightening surprise.

Who Am I? A Fragmented Professional Identity

By David Gussak Ph.D., ATR-BC on September 03, 2015 in Art on Trial
In prisons, where anything can happen, therapists' identities become fluid, constantly shifting until it’s sometimes difficult to remember who we even are. This post examines how such personal challenges arose, providing real life — sometimes horrible — experiences that forced such confusion, and yet how, as an art therapist, tools were available to overcome such trials.

What Happens When the Dogs Strike Back

By Mark Derr on September 03, 2015 in Dog's Best Friend
In "White God," mutts strike back against oppressive humans.

Techniques of Grief Therapy: Assessment and Intervention

By The Book Brigade on September 03, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Everyone experiences loss, because the world is a place of impermanence. There’s no question that loss is painful. But it is also potentially productive.
Getting Along With Others: Parenting for Social Intelligence

Getting Along With Others: Parenting for Social Intelligence

Children and teens can experience social challenges at any point during the school year. Social context—including opportunities for interaction and collaboration with others—makes an enormous difference in what and how much children learn, and how quickly that happens. Here are eight practical tips for parents to help kids build positive relationships.

Emotions That Stimulate Student Learning and Growth

By Andy Tix Ph.D. on September 03, 2015 in The Pursuit of Peace
As Pixar's movie "Inside Out" demonstrates, and as decades of research reveals, specific emotions function in distinct ways. "Knowledge emotions" such as surprise, interest, confusion, and awe may be essential to encouraging students' learning, curiosity, exploration, and reflection this upcoming school year and beyond.

Cyberstalking Yet to Be Taken as Seriously as It Should

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on September 03, 2015 in Talking About Trauma
Cyberstalking poses a significant threat to victims' physical and emotional safety

Getting to the Root of Hidden Anger

Hidden anger can manifest itself in any number of ways, many of which may surprise you. Below are behaviors that may serve as welcome warning signs that anger is hiding in plain sight.

Superfluidity: Decoding the Enigma of Cognitive Flexibility

By Christopher Bergland on September 02, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Brain researchers have developed new tools for predicting levels of cognitive flexibility and "superfluidity" of thought.

Getting to the Source

Reflecting on all the buzz about the "Reproducibility Project," I thought it might be worthwhile to provide some perspective from one of the 270 cast members in the Collaboration about what the experience was like - and intended to be - on our side of the fence.

What Would YOU Have Done in Milgram’s Experiment?

When Stanley Milgram studied the nature of human obedience, he shocked the world. Most people today say that they personally would never have obeyed an authority figure to the point of danger. But what they say may bear little resemblance to what they would actually do.
Is Your Crap Detector Working?

Is Your Crap Detector Working?

By Karl Albrecht Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in BrainSnacks
Are you being hypnotized and intellectually anesthetized by the constant flood of entertainment imagery in the popular culture? As writer Ernest Hemingway advised, maybe it's time to tune up your "crap detector."

Why You Shouldn’t Give Friends Unsolicited Love Advice

By Gwendolyn Seidman Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Close Encounters
Despite our good intentions, our advice to our loved ones may not be welcome... and may not be helpful either. Giving unsolicited advice, particularly unsolicited advice about someone’s relationship, is fraught with difficulties. Here are some reasons why you should reconsider before giving unwanted advice.
The Degenerate Anthropophaginian

The Degenerate Anthropophaginian

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
True crime author places Packer tale in context of cannibalism and crimes in American history.

6 Insider Tips for New Ph.D. Students

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Welcome to the Ph.D. “business”! It’s peculiar and you’re probably entering it at a huge information disadvantage. Profit from these insider tips.

Understanding the Internal World of Psychosis

By Ann Olson Psy.D. on September 02, 2015 in Theory and Psychopathology
For the psychotic individual to be understood, empathy regarding his emotional experience might make a significant difference in his psychopathology and his relationship with the world. It is possible to understand his emotion and his fear, his cognition—to an extent—and his obvious alienation. Ways to address this individual in therapy are discussed in this article.

Be an ADHD World Changer

By Lara Honos-Webb Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in The Gift of ADHD
You can use feelings of shame or of being different to help you discover where your creative contributions lie.