Three Reasons to Not (Always) Trust

Trust is not inherently good

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

Parents and grandparents of boys, take heart: Their time has come.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

Even if we had an Oracle Chip, we'd still need doctors.

The Germanwings Crash, and How We Can Think About It

A pilot and expert in fear of flying on what we can take away from the tragedy.

Sex in the Head

What may look like pure physical arousal is usually much more complicated.

Unnaturally Good: The Plight of the Goody Two-Shoes

Don’t be fooled—not all virtue is the same.

The Latest

Letting Things Have a Life of Their Own

Turning people—turning all things—into projects is a very effective defense against allowing them to have a life of their own. Irrelationship provides a place for our attention to be focused instead of on our fear of real relationship, real intimacy. The conclusion to this brief case study provides an exemplar for how we can recover from the irrleational defense—together.

Getting Off to a Good Start on Your New Job

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in How To Do Life
How to make the most of those first days on the job.

Don't Just Be a Man; Be a Good Man

We can help boys to live happier, healthier lives by helping them to preserve their integrity and relationships.

Departing Earth

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on March 26, 2015 in The Green Mind
Scientists, engineers, and science fiction writers have long imagined leaving Earth to colonize space, but now a budding company is accepting volunteers to become astronauts on a one-way trip to Mars. Is this just the first wave of permanent departures from our home planet—a long exodus in which forsake our precious Earth?

5 Ways to be Braver at Work

Ever found yourself playing it safe rather than speaking up, suggesting a change or taking a chance only to regret it later? There is no doubt, that from time to time, most of us wish we were a little braver when it comes to saying and doing what we think really needs to be done in our work. But what are the practical, tested steps you can take to be braver?

Life Expectancy

By Mario D Garrett PhD on March 26, 2015 in iAge
Check a dictionary and the entry for Life Expectancy is WRONG...no wonder so many people misunderstand the concept.

Let´s Go to the Movies

By Ana Nogales on March 26, 2015 in Family Secrets
Movies have the ability to change our attitude, how we think and feel, and even our values.
The New Improved BMI

The New Improved BMI

BMI categories underestimate the presumed health consequences of lower weights and overestimate the presumed health consequences of higher weights.

Balancing Your Stress Levels One Relationship at a Time

By Amy Banks on March 26, 2015 in Wired For Love
The capacity to feel calm in a healthy relationship is as natural and automatic as the ability to feel terrified watching Friday the 13th. It is how we are wired. However, a culture that teaches “self-regulation” and urges you to stand on your own two feet is sending the wrong message to your nervous system.

Violent Expression: Sign of Our Deep Need to Communicate?

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on March 26, 2015 in The Dolphin Divide
When notions of fair play are violated, our ability to speak helps keep the peace. We are capable of sudden, violent physical outbursts, but calm expressions of anger through language can keep us from resorting to brute force – sometimes.
Affairs: The Healing Process

Affairs: The Healing Process

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on March 26, 2015 in Fixing Families
Affairs are devastating on so many levels, but at its core it is about trust and loss. A map for moving through the normal healing process.

What Makes You Say You’re Lonely?

By Peter Toohey on March 26, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
What does it mean to be lonely and how do say that you are lonely? Is language enough to describe it? Are you lonely just because you think you are lonely and say you are lonely? Or are specific circumstances required for there to be loneliness? What does loneliness mean for the animal and human brain? Is loneliness and the word “loneliness” common to all cultures?

Three Reasons to Not (Always) Trust

The kind of trust that builds good work relationships has conditions, boundaries, and limits. But, do you know them? Do you understand when not to trust?

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Who Participates in Dog-sporting Events and Why?

Although people can be highly competitive in the various dog-sports, recent research shows that internal motives and social benefits are more important than trophies and accolades.

The Most Effective Tactic to Deal With Controlling People

Controllers are hard to spot and will turn the tables on you. Learn how not to give in to the control.

Somatic Experiencing

Somatic Experiencing (SE) is a powerful method of overcoming trauma via the mind-body connection, and often without medication. This piece by Saint-Laurent and Bird is a great introduction for those considering the treatment as well as for therapists interested in SE training.

Help Researchers Hunt Down Trolls

Scientists are embarking on a new project designed to catch trolling comments and isolate them. Share trolling messages you've seen to help build the research database.

Surprise

By The Book Brigade on March 26, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Surprise is good for the brain, great for relationships, and adds a certain frisson all around. Without it, life is lackluster. So why don't more people embrace the unexpected? They run from it or try to subdue it when they should instead roll with it.

Why Laughter Is Contagious

By Rob Kendall on March 26, 2015 in Blamestorming
How does laughter work? Who laughs more when telling a joke - the speaker or the listener? Are there different types of laughter? And do we laugh randomly or not?

Recovering From Seasonal Shifts in Mood in Bipolar Disorder

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on March 26, 2015 in Take Control
For people who have bipolar disorder, seasonal changes in mood can disrupt your health and well being. You can learn to recognize and address these seasonal shifts before they cause harm. We examine the effects of these shifts on motivation, thinking and identity. Early recognition can help you gain better control of bipolar spectrum disorder.
Whatever Happened to Health?

Whatever Happened to Health?

What you don't count often counts most. If the numbers are good, how bad can things be?
Pretty bad.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

"Everyone is different." This is the fundamental tenant of Precision Medicine: to utilize this difference to improve outcome. Real life is more complicated, and there is a lot that is not yet worked out before this approach will yield benefits.

6 Ways to Improve Your Self-Discipline Today

Self-discipline isn't an innate characteristic, it's a learned skill. The good news is, we all have the ability to start improving our self-discipline today.

Anorexia and the Dangers of Blog Post Titles

By Emily T. Troscianko on March 26, 2015 in A Hunger Artist
Few topics induce stronger emotion than parenting and children’s illness, and where emotions are heightened miscommunication can easily occur. Here I try to clarify my mother’s original argument, respond to some readers’ comments which blur the crucial distinction between personal and scientific ‘findings’, and reflect on the role of choice in recovery from anorexia.

Anorexia Affects More Men Than Previously Thought

Anorexia and bulimia are traditionally seen as “female problems” but recent studies show that approximately one third of people with anorexia and about one half of those with bulimia are men.

A Contrarian Approach to Negotiation

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 26, 2015 in How To Do Life
A kinder, gentler, often wiser approach to negotiating your compensation.

The Germanwings Crash, and How We Can Think About It

As uncomfortable as it is to accept, we now have to deal with the fact that a pilot locked his fellow pilot out of the cockpit and intentionally flew a plane filled with passengers into a mountainside.

What No One Tells You About Avoidant Men

A subgroup of men with an avoidant attachment style suffer from a condition known as the Madonna-whore complex. Men with this complex assign Madonna status to some women and whore status to others.