Why You Shouldn’t Give Friends Unsolicited Love Advice

Unwanted advice is more likely to harm than help the recipient.

Now You See It, Now You Don’t: The Many Faces of Narcissism

It’s time for narcissism to be “rebranded”—enter "Rethinking Narcissism."

How Predictable Are You?

What it means and why it matters.

Is Consciousness a Stream? An Update

A new experiment shows perception is discrete, not continuous

Why "Science Benefits When We Think More and Do Less"

A foundation director reflects on the need for leisure in scientific lives

This Trait Costs Men Money, but Makes Them Marriage Material

Would you rather have a broke partner or a broken heart?

The Latest

What Would YOU Have Done in Milgram’s Experiment?

When Stanley Milgram studied the nature of human obedience, he shocked the world. Most people today say that they personally would never have obeyed an authority figure to the point of danger. But what they say may bear little resemblance to what they would actually do.
Is Your Crap Detector Working?

Is Your Crap Detector Working?

By Karl Albrecht Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in BrainSnacks
Are you being hypnotized and intellectually anesthetized by the constant flood of entertainment imagery in the popular culture? As writer Ernest Hemingway advised, maybe it's time to tune up your "crap detector."

Why You Shouldn’t Give Friends Unsolicited Love Advice

By Gwendolyn Seidman Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Close Encounters
Despite our good intentions, our advice to our loved ones may not be welcome... and may not be helpful either. Giving unsolicited advice, particularly unsolicited advice about someone’s relationship, is fraught with difficulties. Here are some reasons why you should reconsider before giving unwanted advice.
The Degenerate Anthropophaginian

The Degenerate Anthropophaginian

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
True crime author places Packer tale in context of cannibalism and crimes in American history.

6 Insider Tips for New Ph.D. Students

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Welcome to the Ph.D. “business”! It’s peculiar and you’re probably entering it at a huge information disadvantage. Profit from these insider tips.

Understanding the Internal World of Psychosis

By Ann Olson Psy.D. on September 02, 2015 in Theory and Psychopathology
For the psychotic individual to be understood, empathy regarding his emotional experience might make a significant difference in his psychopathology and his relationship with the world. It is possible to understand his emotion and his fear, his cognition—to an extent—and his obvious alienation. Ways to address this individual in therapy are discussed in this article.

Be an ADHD World Changer

By Lara Honos-Webb Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in The Gift of ADHD
You can use feelings of shame or of being different to help you discover where your creative contributions lie.

How to Stress Less in a Traffic Jam

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on September 02, 2015 in Minding the Body
Rush-hour commuters in the United States lose an average of 42 hours per year to traffic delays. Here's how to navigate traffic jams with less stress.

New Book Re-examines Lives of Captive and Confined Animals

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Animal Emotions
In his new book called "The End of Captivity?" Dr. Tripp York discusses zoos, pets, conservation, Christian ethics, and much more centering on the lives of captive and otherwise confined animals. It would be a perfect choice for undergraduate and graduate courses in biology and religious studies, and I'm sure high school students would get a lot out of reading it as well.
Crossing the Line

Crossing the Line

Undocumented immigrants may be scapegoats this election cycle, but their plight demonstrates the need for new and more humane state and national policies.

Avoiding Ashley Madison

By Wendy L. Patrick Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Why Bad Looks Good
You cannot "spot" a cheater, but you may be able to "detect" one if you know what to look for and where to look.

What is Resilience? Placing a Buzz Word in Social Context

By Kyle D Killian Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Intersections
Resilience is often reduced to the idea that some folks just "pull themselves up by their own bootstraps."

Now You See It, Now You Don’t: The Many Faces of Narcissism

By Leon F Seltzer Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Evolution of the Self
Are writers on narcissism perhaps too quick to declare this core personality attribute dysfunctional? For in one way or another, narcissistic traits exist in us all. And those seriously lacking in narcissism—as in healthy narcissism—may be just as troubled, and have just as badly distorted a self-image, as those pernicious individuals “super-saturated” with it.
Seven Signs You Need to Find a New Therapist

Seven Signs You Need to Find a New Therapist

As with any relationship, a connection between the therapist and client needs to develop. This is important.

Yes, You Can Improve All Your Relationships

By Temma Ehrenfeld on September 02, 2015 in Open Gently
Better listening saves relationships.

Genitally Does It

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in In Excess
Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is a distressing, handicapping, and/or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in body appearance. One particular body part that has been the focus of some research in the BDD field is that of genitalia. Many men obsessively worry about the size of their penis. But what does the psychological literature tell us?

How Predictable Are You?

By Piero Ferrucci on September 02, 2015 in Your Inner Will
We are wired to be surprising.

Is Consciousness a Stream? An Update

By Evan Thompson Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Waking, Dreaming, Being
Neuroscience and Indian Buddhist philosophy agree that perceptual consciousness seems continuous but is really discrete.

How Much Brain Tissue Do You Need to Function Normally?

Brain injuries typically lead to a loss of function. But sometimes people manage to recover fully, and some even develop new skills and personality traits. This raises the question: How much brain tissue do we really need to function normally?

Young, Confident, Bisexual

By Nick Luxmoore on September 02, 2015 in Young People Up Close
More and more young people are slowly gaining the confidence to resist being defined as one thing or another. More and more say that they "might be bisexual."

The Positive Side to the Personality of Procrastinators

By Garth Sundem on September 02, 2015 in Brain Candy
Research is showing that procras­tination isn’t a defect in ability or personality but rather a disconnect between the demands of a task and what motivates the procrastinator.

Political Correctness Is Bad, When Applied Incorrectly

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Insight Therapy
Trigger Warning: This piece may deeply frustrate those who feast on political correctness hysteria

Workover: A Tilesetter Would Like to Own His Own Business

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in How To Do Life
Advice I gave to a caller to my NPR-San Francisco radio program.

Steve Jobs - The Visionary in the Man (in the Machine)

By Mark Goulston M.D., F.A.P.A. on September 02, 2015 in Just Listen
It seems we can't let go of Steve Jobs until we figure our the secret to his genius, so that we can all think like one. Use this 4 step formula to come darn close.

Why "Science Benefits When We Think More and Do Less"

Does the productivity of scientific careers come at the cost of creativity? One foundation director worries that it does.

How to Spot When Someone is Lying to You

But before we are too quick to judge those in the headlines who find themselves accused of lying, the psychological research indicates that ordinary people tell an average of 1.5 lies a day, but this rate can climb dramatically because how likely you are to deceive depends a lot on the situation you find yourself in.

Life is Short… and so Could Be Your Marriage

By Stan Tatkin Psy.D. on September 01, 2015 in The Puzzle of Love
There is no such thing as “safe” infidelity. Couples who want to stay together need to appreciate the importance of establishing safety and security within their relationship.

10 Health Tips from Harvard Institute of Lifestyle Medicine

By Susan Biali M.D. on September 01, 2015 in Prescriptions for Life
Ten top health and lifestyle tips for better sleep, weight loss, exercise and more, from the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

Lessons From Kenyan Consumers About Technology & Marketing

By Utpal Dholakia on September 01, 2015 in The Science Behind Behavior
Kenya is the global leader in mobile financial services innovation. I describe the lessons from M-Pesa's success story for technology marketers and consumers.

The GPS Approach to Chronic Pain

By Mark Borigini M.D. on September 01, 2015 in Overcoming Pain
It would seem that chronic pain that is experienced as a noxious physical stimulant, and is often hand-in-hand with symptoms whose origin lie in the emotional and cognitive parts of the human being, is fueled by neural links between the somatosensory part of the brain and those parts that process and express emotional and cognitive brain outputs.