Getting to the Source

Confessions of a Replication Scientist

Why You Shouldn’t Give Friends Unsolicited Love Advice

Unwanted advice is more likely to harm than help the recipient.

Now You See It, Now You Don’t: The Many Faces of Narcissism

It’s time for narcissism to be “rebranded”—enter "Rethinking Narcissism."

How Predictable Are You?

What it means and why it matters.

Is Consciousness a Stream? An Update

A new experiment shows perception is discrete, not continuous

Why "Science Benefits When We Think More and Do Less"

A foundation director reflects on the need for leisure in scientific lives

The Latest

Who Am I? A Fragmented Professional Identity

By David Gussak Ph.D., ATR-BC on September 03, 2015 in Art on Trial
In prisons, where anything can happen, therapists' identities become fluid, constantly shifting until it’s sometimes difficult to remember who we even are. This post examines how such personal challenges arose, providing real life—sometimes horrible— experiences that forced such confusion, and yet how, as an art therapist, tools were available to overcome such trials.

What Happens When the Dogs Strike Back

By Mark Derr on September 03, 2015 in Dog's Best Friend
In White God, mutts strike back against oppressive humans.

Techniques of Grief Therapy: Assessment and Intervention

By The Book Brigade on September 03, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Everyone experiences loss, because the world is a place of impermanence. There’s no question that loss is painful. But it is also potentially productive.
Getting Along With Others: Parenting for Social Intelligence

Getting Along With Others: Parenting for Social Intelligence

Children and teens can experience social challenges at any point during the school year. Social context—including opportunities for interaction and collaboration with others—makes an enormous difference in what and how much children learn, and how quickly that happens. Here are eight practical tips for parents to help kids build positive relationships.

Emotions That Stimulate Student Learning and Growth

By Andy Tix Ph.D. on September 03, 2015 in The Pursuit of Peace
As Pixar's movie "Inside Out" demonstrates, and as decades of research reveals, specific emotions function in distinct ways. "Knowledge emotions" such as surprise, interest, confusion, and awe may be essential to encouraging students' learning, curiosity, exploration, and reflection this upcoming school year and beyond.

Cyberstalking Yet to Be Taken as Seriously as It Should

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on September 03, 2015 in Talking About Trauma
Cyberstalking poses a significant threat to victims' physical and emotional safety

Getting to the Root of Hidden Anger

Hidden anger can manifest itself in any number of ways, many of which may surprise you. Below are behaviors that may serve as welcome warning signs that anger is hiding in plain sight.

Superfluidity: Decoding the Enigma of Cognitive Flexibility

By Christopher Bergland on September 02, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Brain researchers have developed new tools for predicting levels of cognitive flexibility and "superfluidity" of thought.

Getting to the Source

Reflecting on all the buzz about the "Reproducibility Project," I thought it might be worthwhile to provide some perspective from one of the 270 cast members in the Collaboration about what the experience was like - and intended to be - on our side of the fence.

What Would YOU Have Done in Milgram’s Experiment?

When Stanley Milgram studied the nature of human obedience, he shocked the world. Most people today say that they personally would never have obeyed an authority figure to the point of danger. But what they say may bear little resemblance to what they would actually do.
Is Your Crap Detector Working?

Is Your Crap Detector Working?

By Karl Albrecht Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in BrainSnacks
Are you being hypnotized and intellectually anesthetized by the constant flood of entertainment imagery in the popular culture? As writer Ernest Hemingway advised, maybe it's time to tune up your "crap detector."

Why You Shouldn’t Give Friends Unsolicited Love Advice

By Gwendolyn Seidman Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Close Encounters
Despite our good intentions, our advice to our loved ones may not be welcome... and may not be helpful either. Giving unsolicited advice, particularly unsolicited advice about someone’s relationship, is fraught with difficulties. Here are some reasons why you should reconsider before giving unwanted advice.
The Degenerate Anthropophaginian

The Degenerate Anthropophaginian

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
True crime author places Packer tale in context of cannibalism and crimes in American history.

6 Insider Tips for New Ph.D. Students

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Welcome to the Ph.D. “business”! It’s peculiar and you’re probably entering it at a huge information disadvantage. Profit from these insider tips.

Understanding the Internal World of Psychosis

By Ann Olson Psy.D. on September 02, 2015 in Theory and Psychopathology
For the psychotic individual to be understood, empathy regarding his emotional experience might make a significant difference in his psychopathology and his relationship with the world. It is possible to understand his emotion and his fear, his cognition—to an extent—and his obvious alienation. Ways to address this individual in therapy are discussed in this article.

Be an ADHD World Changer

By Lara Honos-Webb Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in The Gift of ADHD
You can use feelings of shame or of being different to help you discover where your creative contributions lie.

How to Stress Less in a Traffic Jam

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on September 02, 2015 in Minding the Body
Rush-hour commuters in the United States lose an average of 42 hours per year to traffic delays. Here's how to navigate traffic jams with less stress.

New Book Re-examines Lives of Captive and Confined Animals

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Animal Emotions
In his new book called "The End of Captivity?" Dr. Tripp York discusses zoos, pets, conservation, Christian ethics, and much more centering on the lives of captive and otherwise confined animals. It would be a perfect choice for undergraduate and graduate courses in biology and religious studies, and I'm sure high school students would get a lot out of reading it as well.
Crossing the Line

Crossing the Line

Undocumented immigrants may be scapegoats this election cycle, but their plight demonstrates the need for new and more humane state and national policies.

Avoiding Ashley Madison

By Wendy L. Patrick Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Why Bad Looks Good
You cannot "spot" a cheater, but you may be able to "detect" one if you know what to look for and where to look.

What is Resilience? Placing a Buzz Word in Social Context

By Kyle D Killian Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Intersections
Resilience is often reduced to the idea that some folks just "pull themselves up by their own bootstraps."

Now You See It, Now You Don’t: The Many Faces of Narcissism

By Leon F Seltzer Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Evolution of the Self
Are writers on narcissism perhaps too quick to declare this core personality attribute dysfunctional? For in one way or another, narcissistic traits exist in us all. And those seriously lacking in narcissism—as in healthy narcissism—may be just as troubled, and have just as badly distorted a self-image, as those pernicious individuals “super-saturated” with it.
Seven Signs You Need to Find a New Therapist

Seven Signs You Need to Find a New Therapist

As with any relationship, a connection between the therapist and client needs to develop. This is important.

Yes, You Can Improve All Your Relationships

By Temma Ehrenfeld on September 02, 2015 in Open Gently
Better listening saves relationships.

Genitally Does It

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in In Excess
Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is a distressing, handicapping, and/or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in body appearance. One particular body part that has been the focus of some research in the BDD field is that of genitalia. Many men obsessively worry about the size of their penis. But what does the psychological literature tell us?

How Predictable Are You?

By Piero Ferrucci on September 02, 2015 in Your Inner Will
We are wired to be surprising.

Is Consciousness a Stream? An Update

By Evan Thompson Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Waking, Dreaming, Being
Neuroscience and Indian Buddhist philosophy agree that perceptual consciousness seems continuous but is really discrete.

How Much Brain Tissue Do You Need to Function Normally?

Brain injuries typically lead to a loss of function. But sometimes people manage to recover fully, and some even develop new skills and personality traits. This raises the question: How much brain tissue do we really need to function normally?

Young, Confident, Bisexual

By Nick Luxmoore on September 02, 2015 in Young People Up Close
More and more young people are slowly gaining the confidence to resist being defined as one thing or another. More and more say that they "might be bisexual."

The Positive Side to the Personality of Procrastinators

By Garth Sundem on September 02, 2015 in Brain Candy
Research is showing that procras­tination isn’t a defect in ability or personality but rather a disconnect between the demands of a task and what motivates the procrastinator.