When Words are Deadly Weapons: Michelle Carter´s Conviction

For people who would rather text than talk, words can be more dangerous than sticks and stones. Texting is pervasive and persuasive, facilitating cyber courtship to cyber stalking.

8 Ways to Ask Questions and Improve Your Relationships

Knowing how to ask the right questions is a fundamental skill to relationship-building. Based on new research, these 8 tips will help you get the answers you need.

How Good is Your Psychiatrist? Finding Roses Among Thorns

By Georgia Ede MD on June 24, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
Unhappy with your current psychiatrist? Can't find a psychiatrist? You're not alone—here are some insights and tips that can help.

The Psychology of Selfies

By David Ludden Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in Talking Apes
A new study shows how people adjust the camera angle of their selfies to manage the impression they want to make on other persons.

The Latest

Taking Turns

Do your conversations with others seem to go nowhere? Taking turns can make a difference.
Arkady Lifshits/stocksnap

It's Not My Fault!

How to resolve conflict in a healthy way.

Ethical Dilemmas

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in How To Do Life
Exploring nine common conundrums.

Evergreen College, the Rejection Complex, and Bullying

Evergreen State College was recently in turmoil. There were accusations of racism and bullying along with threats and a show of riot police. What's underneath the hysteria?

Sending the Wrong Message

By Adam Price Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in The Unmotivated Teen
How the best parental advice might backfire

Do You Mate Like a Cavewoman?

By Donna Barstow on June 24, 2017 in Ink Blots Cartoons
If you've never used Darwin in your dating practices before, you're missing out. Cavewomen had multiple orgasms without even trying.

Tagging Toxic Peers: How Online Friends Become Frenemies

Online friendship involves self-disclosure, which increases vulnerability. When friends become frenemies, disclosed personal information becomes ammunition for cyber-aggression.

First aid for when your toddler doesn’t communicate

Every parent knows the feeling of both joy and anxiety when a baby starts growing up and discovering the world, trying everything and experimenting.

The Most Powerful Word For Promoting Love And Intimacy Is...

By Clifford N Lazarus Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in Think Well
There is one simple word that has incredible power when it comes to promoting love, closeness and good feelings in meaningful relationships. It might surprise you know what it is.

Some Advice on Coping Following Trauma

If you, a loved one or friend, has recently been through a traumatic and upsetting event, it may be worth considering some of the following ways of coping

Pride in Mental Health: Visibility

An interview with LGBTQ+ activists Dior Vargas and Cole Ledford.

What Is the Rip Van Winkle Effect?

How do you stop time from passing by so quickly?

How to Reclaim Your Self-Respect After a Bad Break-Up

By Jennice Vilhauer Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in Living Forward
The one thing worse than ending a relationship with someone you love, it is hating yourself on top of it. Learn how to regain your self-respect and confidence.

12 Things to Know About Trust in Times of Distrust

Operating in an era of distrust requires greater trust-knowledge. Here are 12 dos and don'ts about trust at work in this age of increasing cynicism.

Resilience - A Sustaining Gift for Your Children

Resilience in learning, as in life, provides the capacity to persevere through setbacks, take on challenges, and even risk making mistakes on route to reaching goal achievement.

You Are More than Your Emotional Pain: You Are a Person

When you are in emotional pain, do your best to resist defining yourself primarily by that pain which you carry within. You are a person of great worth. Try to see this.

The U.S. Is Not Doing Well Socially

By Christopher Lane Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in Side Effects
The U.S. shows growing signs of being an unhappy, divided country, according to a string of indexes measuring national happiness and well-being.

Grieving and Healing from the Loss of a Friend

Grieving is a process, or rather a difficult climb which requires strength, perseverance and endurance.

Decoding the Complex Brain Mechanics of Altruism and Empathy

A new study by a team of neuroscientists from Duke and Stanford University debunks the myth that a singular brain region is responsible for making decisions that affect others.

Understanding the Personality of Moral Rebels

What does it take to do the right thing in the face of social pressure to conform? And what does this suggest for claims that moral behavior is controlled by situational forces?

Beyond the prophylactic and the panacea

The hospital is a complex solution for the care of the elderly and delirium is an evolutionary fact for which assistance must be given.

Do You Mate Like a Cavewoman?

By Donna Barstow on June 24, 2017 in Ink Blots Cartoons
If you've never used Darwin in your dating practices before, you're missing out. Cavewomen had multiple orgasms without even trying.

Good Grandparent Moments

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in How To Do Life
Some reminders of things to savor

Why Parents Make Us What We Are

Imprinted genes are critically implicated in nurture via their role in the brain and REM sleep.

Imagine Falling Back in Time 600 Years — And Liking It

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in Creating in Flow
When a good writer creates a believable world on the page, it doesn't matter where you go in time, you'll want to keep turning pages.

A Simple Strategy to Help Worried Kids

The more parents say, “It’s fine. Don’t worry!” the more anxious kids demand, “But what if…?” Here's a way to help children use their imagination to manage worries.

My Friend Is Backing Out of Our Trip

Whether this relationship is romantic or platonic, it sounds like he just isn’t that into you.

A Short History of Love

By Neel Burton M.D. on June 23, 2017 in Hide and Seek
How love became the new religion.

Is Implicit Bias a Useful Scientific Concept?

Fewer people than ever before say they are racially prejudiced, yet racial disparities persist. Is implicit bias a viable scientific explanation?