The X Factor: Genetics and Female Mental Health

A single X chromosome gene explains a lot about women’s risk of mental illness.

Preventing Disaster Through Screening and Assessment

Screening and Assessment Are Vital Tools We Can Use To Avert Disaster

The Compassionate Way to End a Relationship

Of the 47 ways to leave your lover, there's one that hurts the least

3 Reasons Not to Spend Your Money on Things

Science says buying new shoes won't make you happier, but a dinner out might

Facebook Rainbows

On Why Gay Pride Support on Facebook Matters

14 Tips for Parenting in Public

For the times you have felt nudged into parenting in a certain way

The Latest

Do Boys Need Rough and Tumble Play?

Why do boys wrestle and play pretend fighting? Do all boys do this? Should we view it as violence or innocent fun?

Self-Faith

By Christa Smith Psy.D. on June 30, 2015 in Shift
Learning how to trust yourself

Garner, Affleck, Marital Therapy, and Divorce

The tabloids exploded with curiosity and innuendo of terrible trouble once Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner were discovered going to a marital therapist. Now with a pending divorce, people’s worst fears are confirmed. Apparently if your spouse suggests therapy, it is a last ditch effort or a way to tell you it’s over. So teaches Hollywood. But is it?

How The Ownership Of Something Increases Our Valuations

When we own something we begin to value it more than other people do.

Exploring Post Traumatic Growth

In recent years, we’ve heard a lot about post-traumatic stress, or PTSD, and the negative effects it can have on a person’s overall health and wellness. PTSD is triggered in response to either experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event, particularly if that event is life threatening

4 Observations on Memory and Emotion

By Alex Korb Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in PreFrontal Nudity
Watching Pixar's Inside-Out, I was moved through a full range of emotions, but also, as a neuroscientist, I was impressed with the nuanced depiction of complex brain functions that the movie depicted. Understanding these can help you better understand yourself:

5 "Flaws" That Make You More Lovable

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in In Love and War
You may think that people love you despite your flaws, not because of them. But some of the traits that you see as flaws may be more attractive than you realize.

5 Tips for Taming Overly Wired and Overly Rude Teens

Rude teenagers may be simply practicing the skills their parents have allowed to take root. If a child grows up interacting in a private, virtual world more often than interacting one-on-one with family, a whole slew of social skills and social learning will be missed.

“Siblings are the Awesomest”: Children Talk About Siblings

I figured if Piaget was able to develop entire theories and write countless books on cognitive development based on observations of his own children, I can at least write one article using the perspectives of my own offspring.

Eight Ways to Move On From Failure & Disappointment

Failure and disappointment are an inevitable part of life, yet they can be challenging and difficult to deal with. Research shows that persistence and determination are as or more important to success than natural talent. Here are 8 tools to help you get back out there and keep putting your best self forward.

Why We Use Drugs: The Power of Addictive Tendencies

Addictions are a hotel; they are not home but can remind people of home so powerfully that they won’t easily abandon them without knowing where their real home is and how to get there.

The Psychological Transition from College to Pro Sports

Athletes moving into professional sports are often not prepared for the psychological challenges that lie ahead of them. If this transition is not dealt with properly, the consequences can be detrimental in the long run.

Why are people with disabilities the targets of violence?

Why do offenders target people with disabilities? Are there links between types of disability and type of victimization? The Data Doctor answers a question from the aunt of a former student.

Coping with Adversity from "Inside Out"

This film effectively and hilariously shines a light on the inner workings of our emotional brains and why we struggle at times. Most powerfully, its metaphor of "Emotions at Your Central Control Panel" offers a useful way to reflect on our own feelings and how they can push us to react, sometimes to our disadvantage. Required viewing for anyone operating a human brain.

Of Crime, Criminality, and Nature

By Joe Nedelec Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in The Nature of Crime
Thieving primates, invading chimpanzees, alcoholic monkeys, and insect rape are a few examples of the criminality evident in nature discussed in this post. To further lay the foundation for a biosocial viewpoint of crime and criminality, this post examines how human criminal behavior has numerous analogues in the wild.

Are You Having a Relationship with an Adult Coloring Book?

As of this writing, five of the top 30 titles on Amazon’s best-seller list are adult coloring books. With over 2000 titles out there and rising, the phenomenon of adult coloring-within-the-lines just seems to have no end in sight. Just why have adult coloring books become such a phenomenon?

The Art of Farming

The corn did not look good. The transplants were bending over sideways. What good would it do to dance?

4 Steps to Leave a Narcissist

By Judith Orloff M.D. on June 30, 2015 in Emotional Freedom
On the surface narcissists can seem charming, intelligent, caring—knowing how to entice and lure their way back into your life. But once they reel you back then they revert to their egotistical selves.

Why Beauty Isn’t As Important As You Think

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in The Sports Mind
New research finds that attractiveness does little to guarantee a healthy relationship.

The X Factor: Genetics and Female Mental Health

XIST, the gene that controls X chromosome gene expression, is up regulated in psychosis, just as the imprinted brain theory predicts.

The SCOTUS Ruling on Marriage Equality is Good for Everyone

By Mark O'Connell L.C.S.W. on June 30, 2015 in Quite Queerly
The language of American law--e.g., “Marriage is a commitment between one man and one woman.”--is sometimes in need of a hermeneutic update in order to truly do its job: to protect us all. In much the same way it is often necessary to use anomalous language in a variety of disciplines--medicine, psychology, religion--as we live, learn, and evolve.

Paying it Forward

Imagine someone does something nice for you. You then see someone else that needs help. Are you more likely to help that person? What if you were mistreated by someone, are you more likely to then mistreat a person unrelated to the situation?

What Is Wrong With Dichotomous Thinking

It is said that there are two kinds of people, those who think there are two kinds of people and those who don't. Please discuss.

Beyond the Toddler Years

We are continuing our exploration of the three pillars of human development--Affects (Feelings), Language, and Cognition. This month we wrap up the section of Language by examining the link between feelings and words, a process we call translation.

How Light Harms Your Sleep

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Light exposure alters the ebb and flow in the body of the “sleep” hormone melatonin, which occurs in circadian rhythm.

My Daughter Is Going To College And I Am Terrified

How To Handle Anxiety About College

Sentimental Journey

By Susan Hooper on June 30, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
Summer vacations in my childhood meant annual visits to my parents’ families in New England. This summer I returned to my mother’s Vermont hometown for the first time in decades. I found people and places there that reminded me happily of my mother, her family and my own youth.

Harnessing the Freedom to Choose Success

Arms folded in front of her, Jana tried to remain calm in the face of a challenge from her parents and me. Joan and Ron, successful professionals who had grown up in the drug scene of the 1970s, were stuck. They agreed that her diagnosis of abuse of alcohol ought not to be ignored, but did not want to “crimp her style” or lead her into a rebellion which might lead her to

Empathic and Fun-Loving Rats also Dream of a Better Future

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in Animal Emotions
New research shows rats may dream of the future just as humans do. The rats appear to be "rehearsing totally novel journeys that the animals need to take in order to reach the food” according to one of the researchers.