5 New Insights on Anger

Number 3 will blow your freaking mind.

Three Paradoxical Ways for Coping With Romantic Abundance

Love Is in the Air, But the Air is Too Dense

WOSPs, the Amalfi Coast, and Unstructured Play in Children

Organized Sports Has Killed Unstructured Play in Children

Can Improv Comedy Treat Social Anxiety?

How learning improv comedy reduces social anxiety for some

Do I Complain Too Much?

How to complain more effectively

How The Internet Tricks You Into Thinking You Are Smarter

We're dependent on the Internet for the answers, and confused about what we know

The Latest

What Makes A Great Lover

By Isadora Alman MFT on August 03, 2015 in Sex & Sociability
The ingredients that comprise a great lover may surprise you.

Are You a Chronic Journal Ditcher?

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in The Web of Violence
Higher emotional clarity and better self-understanding? Sounds great, right? Here are some tips to help you stop ditching that journal and stick to a writing routine.

How the American Psychological Association Lost Its way

By Roy Eidelson Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Dangerous Ideas
In Toronto this week, APA leaders will face members’ confusion and rage during Council governance meetings, a three-day teach-in organized by Psychologists for Social Responsibility, and open town hall meetings. Can this soul-searching be channeled into fruitful reforms, not just to the organization, but for the future of the field? A lot is at stake in the days ahead.

Before There Were TED Talks, There Were Chautauquas

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Innovation You
Before there were TED talks, there were Chautauquas. In the late-nineteenth century, Americans looking for cultural stimulation and intellectual inspiration gathered for weeklong retreats of lectures, performances, and conversations.

Refill Your Cupboard

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Your Wise Brain
Stress builds up over time, so it's important to do small things throughout the day to keep the stress meter in the "green zone." There are many ways to lower the sense of stress in your mind or body, even in the middle of a busy day.

Sharing Is Important, Not Easy

More adult sons and daughters are returning to the family nest to live; which complicates life for both them and their parents.

How to Be a Natural Helper

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in The Web of Violence
There are easy ways to make a positive impact on the lives of people who are experiencing adversity, and you don't need a professional license or degree to do so.

What I've Learned about Friendships in my 20s (So Far)

By Rubin Khoddam on August 03, 2015 in The Addiction Connection
Navigating your twenties is hard, especially socially, as we make and lose friends. But here are some tips I've learned about friends in my twenties so far.

Who Should Own A Gun?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Are there specific guidelines for mental health professionals to follow in judging the risk of allowing certain people to own guns?
A new article published in the journal Professional Psychology: Research and Practice provides practical guidelines for firearm assessments and the sort of questions that professionals should ask prospective gun owners.

Soliloquest

By Bernard L. De Koven on August 03, 2015 in On Having Fun
Talking to yourself is sometimes very, very fun.

Here's How You Can Become An Expert

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Memory Medic
Is there a shortcut to becoming an expert?
My College Roommate Sent Me a Sketch of Myself

My College Roommate Sent Me a Sketch of Myself

By Gretchen Rubin on August 03, 2015 in The Happiness Project
It’s funny, though, what can unleash a memory.

The Pet Privilege: How Animals Help Children Thrive

Granddaughters Ava and Sara discuss their delight in owning their cats, Ellie and Rudy, and describe their enjoyment of frequent visits with our dogs, Bliss and Oakley. Research underscores that pet ownership and animal interaction can assist children in optimal life development in some surprising ways.

5 New Insights on Anger

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Curious?
Here I present "in press" research for the first time on what we learned by examining 2342 episodes of intense anger in everyday life. What we found introduces new insights into this complex emotional experience.
The Future of God

The Future of God

An Insightful Approach to Spirituality

Three Paradoxical Ways for Coping With Romantic Abundance

Romantic love is often characterized as involving a great deal of sensitivity, excitement, and closeness. However, our cyber society often provides an overabundance of these features. Hence, a few opposite principles are proposed: (a) Indifference is the new romantic sensitivity; (b) Calmness is the new romantic excitement; and (c) Distance is the new romantic closeness.

Is Human Connection the Antidote for Addiction?

In the 1970's Bruce Alexander ran an experiment to question the universality of the “drug-induced addiction.” He built a "rat park" where test subjects (rats) were offered enrichment rather than (the usual) deprivation. He found that when given a choice to bond with others, most test subjects do. Human parallels are drawn, comparisons with irrelationship are offered.

Single Life—Now Even Couples Want a Piece of It

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Living Single
After decades in which living single has been stereotyped and stigmatized, is it now becoming something that even couples want a piece of?

10 Anger Quotes That Will Transform Your Life

By Steven Laurent on August 03, 2015 in Chill Pill
Number three is genius!

Sad Job-Seeker Syndrome and Antidotes

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in How To Do Life
The misleadingly low unemployment masks real pain among many job seekers.

Helicopter Parenting Isn’t Killing Millennials, but This Is

By Linda Esposito LCSW on August 02, 2015 in From Anxiety to Zen
Doing this could save your kid's sanity (and maybe even his life).

What Does Your Body Say About You?

Your body may be trying to tell you something - are you listening? How will you respond?

It’s Not 'All in Your Head.' It’s in Your Brain.

Current research helps us to understand that some physical illnesses, especially those that are not easily explained, are not made up at all. They are the result of complex neuroendocrine responses due to heredity, trauma and stress. The symptoms are real. They are not all in one’s head.
Mind and Body in Concert— Healing without Harm

Mind and Body in Concert— Healing without Harm

The mind-body connection has been well-studied and is very real. Are you ready to trade in the prescription pad for empowerment of your own health care? This article is a great start.

The Secular/Religious Divide

In which religious psychologist Josh Gressel tries to see the religious/secular divide from both sides of the fence.

Incivility in the Workplace

Caution: Your workplace may be hazardous to your health.

Can Improv Comedy Treat Social Anxiety?

By Jon Fortenbury on August 02, 2015 in NeuroProgress
People are increasingly turning to improv comedy (theatre made up on the spot) to reduce social anxiety. The reason it's working for some and not all is simple, but powerful.

Take Action – Now!

Nothing, absolutely nothing, will change without doing what's necessary to bring it about. Wishing won't, hoping won't, even praying won't. Only doing will. In this blog through the magical ACT formula, bring more pleasure, satisfaction, and happiness into your life.

Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep... Annotated

By Mark Goulston M.D., F.A.P.A. on August 02, 2015 in Just Listen
Now I lay me down to sleep,

At the end of the day this is about not doing another thing before you fall asleep. It's about letting go of control with the hope that a good night's sleep will replenish your mind (with everything that the stresses of the day has taken away), will refresh it and enable you to "reboot" it to take on the next day playing with a