Apocalypse Again: Why Can't We Get Enough?

Unpacking why we love the threat of disaster

How Facebook Affects Our Relationships

Whether Facebook helps or harms your relationship depends on how you use it.

Infatuation, Temptation? How Think Less About That Person

Telling yourself to stop may not be enough.

The Real Reason Religion Is Declining In America

Why the U.S. will eventually resemble Europe

A Beautiful Mind: What Did John Nash Really Have?

Are we sure it was schizophrenia?

How Evolutionary Psychology Illuminates Everyday Life

10 Cliches that all have an evolutionary basis

The Latest

FIFA Fo Fum I Smell the Blood of Corruption

What’s most shocking about the FIFA corruption scandal is that it has been going on for so long with so many people aware of it and yet the majority turning a blind eye to it.

Thriving Beyond Addiction: A Complete User-FriendlyGuide

By The Book Brigade on May 28, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Recovering from addiction doesn't have to be difficult, says psychologist Tom Rohrer. But you do have to know why you want to recover and hold on to that knowledge.

Social Influence About Risk Differs for Teens and Adults

By Art Markman Ph.D. on May 28, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Life is full of risky decisions. Some involve physical risks like crossing the street against the light. Others involve social risks like expressing an opinion that differs from those of peers. Still others involve financial risks like investing in the stock of a new company.

Are you a left or right-brained person?

Do you think of yourself as a right- or left-brained person and does it matter?
How to Live 5 More Years

How to Live 5 More Years

Move more, live longer.

Apocalypse Again: Why Can't We Get Enough?

Why do we love the idea of our own demise?

Can You Grow From the Loss of Love?

The painful experience of a lost love relationship can spur positive emotional growth, depending on how you deal with its impact.

Couples Therapy with Motor Sister's Pearl Aday and Scott Ian

Pearl Aday of the band Pearl and daughter of legendary rocker Meat Loaf, and Scott Ian of Anthrax share how they are able to work together, defy stereotypes and make their marriage work. Their secret: appreciating one another, communicating and working to resolve problems.

How Addiction Makes Strangers of Those We Love

Addiction can turn those we are closest to into people we don’t recognize – people who lie, steal, manipulate and who appear to value their drug of choice much more than they value us. As we watch in anguish as they turn their backs on all that once had meaning for them, we find ourselves asking, “Why don’t they care?”

Not Sleeping?

Rolling around in bed thinking a mile a minute when you want to be sleeping isn’t fun. Sometimes a simple mindfulness routine can turn down the tensions and send you into dreamland.

End Of Term Report

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on May 28, 2015 in In Excess
Many people confuse the term ‘problem gambling’ with ‘gambling addiction’. These two terms are not inter-changeable. When I give lectures on gambling addiction I always point out that “all gambling addicts are problem gamblers but not all problem gamblers are gambling addicts”. Find out why in my latest article on gambling psychology.

"Surf Therapy" and Being in the Ocean Can Alleviate PTSD

Recently I spoke with filmmaker Josh Izenberg about his new documentary "Resurface." The short film is about military veterans who learn to surf as a way to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and transform their lives.

How Facebook Affects Our Relationships

Facebook has influenced the way couples interact with and feel about each other and their relationships. But, you may wonder if that change is for better or worse. So let’s examine the ups and downs of having a relationship in the age of Facebook.

Additional Aternative Medicine

We live longer and more healthily than ever before in history, in part because of medical advance. And yet we long for something more mystical than orthodox medicine. Why?

Moneygrams: Recalled Childhood Memories About Money

A surprising number of people are "money troubled". Because money is a taboo topic people often get surprised by the money beliefs and habits of their partners who they have known for a long time. But where do these money attitudes and habits come from? Do we have moneygrams from our childhood?

Kids and TV

By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on May 27, 2015 in Screen Time
Why do you think people tend to be so fearful about the effects on TV?

As Mental Health Awareness Month Winds Down...

Each of us can think about our own mental wellness--for the month of May and beyond.

How to Talk to a Single Person

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 27, 2015 in Living Single
Some people seem to have a hard time conversing with single people. All they can think of to ask is whether the single person is seeing someone. Even worse, researchers can be just as flummoxed. A survey claiming to be "the most comprehensive" about single life asked only about 1 question of 128 that was not about becoming unsingle. Here's how to talk to a single person.

3 Reasons We Disclose Too Much Information to Strangers

Have you ever told intimate details of your life to a stranger on a plane? Does your hair stylist know your whole life story? Why do we disclose so much personal information to complete strangers? Here are 3 surprising psychological reasons.
10 Secrets Every Parent Needs to Know about Saying No

10 Secrets Every Parent Needs to Know about Saying No

How can I say "no" if I don't resort to threats? This is, of course, the million dollar question. All parents wish their children would just comply when we ask them to do something. Luckily, it is indeed possible to help children WANT to cooperate, without resorting to yelling, threats or harshness. Read on to learn how.

Play, Primates, Jealousy, Work, and Losing Deliberately

By Peter Toohey on May 27, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
Gorillas like to play games and when they do they sometimes lose deliberately. Why? “Self-handicapping” encourages their playmate to keep on with the game. Jealousy can be very like play – there are triangles, winners and losers, and feelings run high. This is very true of workplace jealousy. Does self-handicapping have a role to play in mitigating workplace jealous?

Infatuation, Temptation? How Think Less About That Person

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on May 27, 2015 in Mental Mishaps
You meet someone new and attractive. Temptation strikes. Perhaps you’re a little infatuated. The eye looks and the mind wanders. You find your thoughts keep returning to the encounter and the possibility for romance, sex, or relationship. But if you’re already in a committed and happy relationship, you may not want those thoughts. How can you stop those thoughts?

Sounding Off About High-Volume Friends

How to reclaim our personal quiet zones and restore peace. High-volume blusterers are often chronic – even if unknowing – offenders, and they are generally among our least favorite folks to encounter. Otherwise pleasant personalities become ones we avoid. The psychology of behavioral shaping offers a polite way to turn down the volume.

Jordan Dog: Dismembered, Abandoned, and Rehabilitated

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on May 27, 2015 in Animal Emotions
A video of the rescue and rehabilitation of an abused and abandoned dog named Jordan will force you to question our conflicting relationships with other animals. I hate to say it, but you must watch this video and share it widely. The scientific field of anthrozoology is concerned with the study of human-animal relationships and this video is a must-see for all.

Sleep Apnea May Raise Risk for Depression in Men

Not only can OSA raise your risk for heart problems, excessive daytime fatigue, and liver issues, but a new study finds that it also doubles the risk for depression in men between the ages of 35 and 83.

Five Ways to Deal with Anger

By Ryan Martin Ph.D. on May 27, 2015 in All the Rage
Once we understand why we get mad, we can start to understand how to use our anger in the best possible way.

Un-Churched Chimps

Research on monkeys and chimpanzees suggests that moral sensibilities evolved long before religious sensibilities.