For the Sake of the Children

Divorce isn’t failure; living in unhappiness is failure

Obsess Much? Here’s Why

The Evolutionary Psychology of Rumination

Why You're Lucky to be Single and Seeking Love

Your longing for love is wisdom, not weakness

How to Pray for an Atheist

The etiquette of unsolicited prayers

Dilemmas in Diagnosis: Is it Autism, Anxiety, or Neither?

The need for a label may limit our search for understanding and healing

What Scientists Know and Need to Share with the Public

Science is messy, uncertain, and very important

The Latest

Using Good Memory Habits to Boost Your Memory

We all make memory mistakes from time to time. In this posting, we talk about a strategy to help with common memory problems, a strategy that is a lot like Grandma’s advice … a pearl of wisdom based not so much on hard scientific evidence but proven through years of experience.

Does a Resting Mind Correspond to the Brain's Default Mode?

The resting mind may correspond to a "default mode network" found in brain scans, so being in the moment might parallel a built-in biological pause for neural refreshment.

The Traumatized Brain

A new blog about brain injury from the authors of the upcoming book, The Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior after Brain Injury.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Weight Loss

The contradiction at the heart of most weight-loss "treatment."

Personality Challenges, Perfectionism, and Self-Compassion

By Dan Mager MSW on August 31, 2015 in Some Assembly Required
Having compassion for oneself means that we can honor our humanness by accepting ourselves—even during those times when we inevitably come up against our limitations and fall short of our ideals.

3 Ways to Boost Your Mental Strength

If you want a strong mind, you need to exercise it daily.

What Is the Link Between Depression and Diabetes?

People tend to gain and lose weight all their lives, but do these extra pounds lead to poor health?

Bargain Better in Life Using Hostage Negotiation Psychology

The idea was to get the message home; the situation was hopeless for the hostage taker. Demonstration of overwhelming firepower convinces that giving oneself up is the only option. It seems to make logical sense.If this had worked without substantial loss of life, then we might still be using it today. The Contending Model, because it was so lethal, went out of fashion...

Assembling Your Innovation Advisory Board

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Innovation You
Conflict is inevitable when you put such a wide variety of perspectives on one advisory board--and that's a good thing.

Getting Into Your Growth Zone

If we look closely, what we find nested inside our comfort zone is a little rabbit hole—our complacency zone.

3 Long-Term Investments for Lasting Love

When the physical hunger starts to wane, what can you do to keep the fire of steady love stoked?

Turmoil in China

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Hidden Motives
Why are the Chinese in a panic about what is just a financial bubble?
Smashing the Glass Ceiling: Women Rangers

Smashing the Glass Ceiling: Women Rangers

By Michael D. Matthews Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Head Strong
Military psychologists have played an important role in the successful integration of women into combat and other non-traditional military jobs.

Is it Normal to ‘Hear Voices’?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on August 31, 2015 in Psych Unseen
Hearing voices can be a normal experience, but what are auditory hallucinations and what does hearing them mean?

Your Opportunity to Move

Dr. Segar, who directs the Sport, Health and Activity Research and Policy Center at the University of Michigan, extols the virtues of our innate opportunity to move through space or water at our own will and in our own way. Taking this concept to its logical completion we begin to understand the vast importance of her thinking.

Is There a Right Way to Grieve?

By Jen Kim on August 31, 2015 in Valley Girl With a Brain
The hardest part about losing a loved one is not that they’re gone.

For the Sake of the Children

By Mel Schwartz L.C.S.W. on August 31, 2015 in A Shift of Mind
Many people in unhappy or conflicted marriages stay together for the purported sake of the children. This article examines this premise and explores what's really best for our children.

A Tribute to Letter Writing and to Oliver Sacks

By Susan R Barry Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Eyes on the Brain
My friendship with Oliver Sacks blossomed through an old fashioned medium, letter writing.

When Social Media Goes Too Far

At last count, the video depicting the tragic fatal shooting of a young news reporter in Virginia had garnered over 10 million views on social media. Despite warnings of its extremely graphic content- or perhaps because of that warning- as soon as the video was posted it went viral. Why is it that so many people were drawn to something so disturbing?

Listening to Your Inner Voice

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Inner speech is far more important than most people realize. From early childhood onward, inner speech plays a vital role in regulating how we think and behave. Not only does it often allow us to "rehearse" different scenarios and enables us to avoid rash actions, but inner speech may be essential to memory and self-awareness as well.

The #1 Parenting Tip to Change Rebellious Teens

By Linda Esposito LCSW on August 31, 2015 in From Anxiety to Zen
Teens need calm, firm discipline in order to thrive during adolescence. Learn how to be his success ambassador.

What Is Love?

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Hot Thought
The best way to state the nature of love is to identify standard examples, typical features, and explanatory roles. Love is an emotion consisting of patterns of neural firing that represent a lover, a loved one, intense feelings, and caring behavior, all tied to chemical changes in the brain.

The Enduring, Ghoulish Legend of Lizzie Borden

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Wicked Deeds
The story of Lizzie Borden has taken on mythical proportions over the years. Despite her acquittal in criminal court in the nineteenth century for the murders of her father and stepmother, Lizzie has always been considered guilty by the public as a result of ghoulish media and cultural representations of her.

How to Have a Husband on the Side

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Living Single
What if you are married with kids, but you don't consider your spouse the most important person in your life? How can you arrange your life to honor the people you care about most, and also maintain the important place of both parents in the lives of the kids?

How Counselors and Coaches Can Stand Out From the Crowd

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in How To Do Life
With a counselor and coach under every rock, providers must stand out without being cheesy

Earth to Humans: Why Have You Forsaken Me? Discredence

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in The Green Mind
What are the psychological roadblocks that explain why we’re not doing much to solve global climate change—a phenomenon that threatens the core of our society? This is the fifth installment in a seven-part series.

The Shocking Truth About Poaching

By Ryan Anderson on August 30, 2015 in The Mating Game
You can't always get what you want

3 Ways Your Beliefs Can Shape Your Reality

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on August 30, 2015 in In Love and War
Beliefs may not single-handedly determine your physical health, financial status, and chances at finding love, as some claim, but they are powerful nonetheless.

Feeling Phone-verwhelmed?

By Suzanne Gelb Ph.D., J.D. on August 30, 2015 in All Grown Up
Enjoy specific steps that you can take to create a healthier, more balanced relationship with your phone — and all forms of technology, for that matter.

Obsess Much? Here’s Why

Obsessive rumination can be tied specifically to one’s own failures – for good evolutionary reasons. Understanding the nature of rumination may hold a key to dealing with this facet of mental life.