Confessions of a Know-it-All

The illusion of knowledge is an enemy of wonder

We Are What We Landscape

Desert plants or lawn? Communicating identity through our front yard.

The Uses of Shame

How society makes use of shame to enforce its values

Another Flashbulb Memory Bites the Dust

Guest post: I remember 9/11 so clearly in my mind. And so wrongly.

Nine Lessons from Mad Men: The Emotional Cost of Dishonesty

How our lies hurt us and how to repair the damage caused by dishonesty

The Latest

The Joys of Self-Infliction

It is an illusion that people want to be happy, at least to judge by the way they behave.

A Workover: A Career Changer Wants into Alternative Energy

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on May 22, 2015 in How To Do Life
Advice I gave to a caller to my NPR-San Francisco radio program.

Finding the Truth through Forensic Media Psychology

In years ahead, law schools, schools of psychology, television, media and film, business schools and schools of public policy will offer courses, certificates and degrees in Forensic Media Psychology; a field whose time has arrived.

Clark Strand: Are you addicted to light?

By Jennifer Haupt on May 21, 2015 in One True Thing
Waking up to the dark was viewed as a nightly blessing before the introduction of artificial light. That restless dread so many of us feel in the middle of the night is a byproduct of our artificially lengthened days and the amount of wattage we've taken in through information, advertising, news alerts, and actual light.

Do You Have the Personality to Drive an Indy Car?

Driving at over 200 miles per hour around an oval track requires not only a well-tuned engine, but also a driver with the right personality.

The Drama of the Drone Warrior

By Yosef Brody Ph.D. on May 21, 2015 in Limitless?
The new drone warfare movie starring Ethan Hawke may be fiction but ironically it gives a better sense of the workings and effects of our actual drone program than has been offered so far by government officials.
Are You An Ethical Leader?

Are You An Ethical Leader?

If you’re really honest with yourself for a moment how ethical are your leadership behaviors?

Cause and Effect in Wine Drinkers’ Health

We think we know what causes what. But research shows we are greatly mistaken, and often confuse correlation with cause.

The Melancholy of Anatomy: Excessive Weight and Depression

Does a depressive disorder lead to weight gain or does weight gain lead to a depressive disorder? Studies in the past few years seem to indicate a “bidirectional relationship” between excessive weight and depression, with major public health implications.

Is the DSM Turning into a Train Wreck?

Psychiatry is rapidly losing faith in the DSM. The National Institute for Mental Health has already rejected it as a symptom guide for research. The Europeans are openly skeptical. Yet the trainee psychiatrists are still obliged to memorize it and pretend that the DSM illnesses (“bipolar disorder,” “major depression,” and “social anxiety disorder”) are real.

The Long Hot Pressure: Cool it With Micro-Successes

It is hard to stay motivated for the long run but easier if you take this suggestion.

How to Give Your Child a Rich Life

We all want to raise kids who know how to work hard to create what they want in the world. Nobody wants to raise a child who thinks the world owes him, who feels like he’s entitled to take whatever he wants. We also DO want to raise a child who feels deserving of the blessings of abundance. How do we raise a child we feels deserving - but not "entitled"?

A Relationship Advisor Talks About How To Be Single

By Donna Flagg on May 21, 2015 in Honestly
A chat with Tamsen Fadal about her new guide to empowerment after a big life change such as a breakup or divorce.

Criminals as Counselors: A Clarification

One does not have to be a criminal to help criminals change. But having lived a life of crime does not automatically disqualify an offender from helping others who are like him change

Understanding Nomophobia: Just Something Else to Worry About

My appreciation of the connection and conveniences offered by my smartphone might qualify as a pathology. That’s right folks, according to a recent study, I may have a disorder called nomophobia, which means that I get anxious, fearful and stressed out if and when I’m unable to access or use my smartphone.

3 Ways to Make Your Work More Meaningful

People who believe that their lives have meaning and purpose share a whole host of healthy benefits: they are happier, feel more in control over their lives, feel more engaged at work (and high engagement usually means less burnout), report less depression and anxiety and less workaholism.

What You Didn't Know About that Mad Men Encounter Group

In the last episode of Mad Men, Don Draper's personal growth experience has deep roots in the human potential movement, humanistic psychology, and J.L. Moreno's psychodrama.

Flying Home From Home (Part 2)

During the Combatants For Peace event, families from both sides speak their grief and tell their stories of loss, in all the wars, translated into Hebrew, Arabic, and English. Knowing that despite fierce and vicious criticism of this alternative ceremony there are more and more people who attend feeds my hope that there may yet be a collaborative future.

Do Moral Violations Require a Victim?

By Jesse Marczyk on May 21, 2015 in Pop Psych
On the matter of whether harmless moral violations actually exist

What Keeps You From Being Unconditionally Self-Accepting?

The desire to become your personal best is normal—and it’s admirable. But wanting to become better than others, not so much . . . maybe not at all. For, so defined, this particular goal reflects an inflated, aggressive, and possibly domineering ego. If you genuinely see yourself as unique—for, after all, there’s never been anybody exactly like you, then . . .

Remembering Frederic Hudson

Entering the Wardrobe and Falling Into a Rabbit Hole: a fortuitous invitation

Are Umpires Racist?

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on May 21, 2015 in The Sports Mind
Umpires call more strikes for pitchers of their own race. Fact or fiction?

Dog's Brains Are Tuned to Recognize Human Faces

Recent fMRI data shows that dogs' sensitivity to human faces and expressions may be wired into the canine brain.
Have You Ever Felt a “Call” to Do a Certain Kind of Work?

Have You Ever Felt a “Call” to Do a Certain Kind of Work?

A call means no choice — or at least, great pain in making another choice.
What's Wrong With Immortality?

What's Wrong With Immortality?

Plan to live forever - or die trying?

The Changing Face of the Heroin Addict

Heroin use is spiking across the United States, especially among middle-class populations without prior history of use.
Confessions of a Know-it-All

Confessions of a Know-it-All

The feeling of knowing is an essential brain sensation, without which we would not likely strive to learn. And yet, the feeling of being right is not necessarily connected to actually being correct.

Decision-Making 101

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on May 21, 2015 in Memory Medic
Good decision making depends on selective attention skills. Seniors are better at this than young people, whose culture and schools are making matters worse.

Barred Art: Reflections on a Prison Art Show

Guest blogger and colleague Shannon Schmitz, an art therapist who has spent many years working as an art therapist in various prison settings, offers heartfelt musings following her recent experience of judging an art show in a makeshift prison art gallery.