Three Reasons to Not (Always) Trust

Trust is not inherently good.

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

Parents and grandparents of boys, take heart: Their time has come.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

Even if we had an Oracle Chip, we'd still need doctors.

The Germanwings Crash, and How We Can Think About It

A pilot and expert in fear of flying on what we can take away from the tragedy.

Sex in the Head

What may look like pure physical arousal is usually much more complicated.

Unnaturally Good: The Plight of the Goody Two-Shoes

Don’t be fooled—not all virtue is the same.

The Latest

The Case of the Incentivized Applicant

It was a good day for Ms. Robbin Peter, who was just finishing her graduate degree in psychology. She had applied to twelve professor jobs, and she was just offered her third interview! The first two schools offered to fly her out and pay all her expenses. But the department chair at the University of Eastern West Virginia in Resume Speed said this:

Three Reasons to Not (Always) Trust

The kind of trust that builds good work relationships has conditions, boundaries, and limits. But, do you know them? Do you understand when not to trust?

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Who Participates in Dog-sporting Events and Why?

Although people can be highly competitive in the various dog-sports, recent research shows that internal motives and social benefits are more important than trophies and accolades.

The Most Effective Tactic to Deal With Controlling People

Controllers are hard to spot and will turn the tables on you. Learn how not to give in to the control.

Somatic Experiencing

Somatic Experiencing (SE) is a powerful method of overcoming trauma via the mind-body connection, and often without medication. This piece by Saint-Laurent and Bird is a great introduction for those considering the treatment as well as for therapists interested in SE training.

Help Researchers Hunt Down Trolls

Scientists are embarking on a new project designed to catch trolling comments and isolate them. Share trolling messages you've seen to help build the research database.

Surprise

By The Book Brigade on March 26, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Surprise is good for the brain, great for relationships, and adds a certain frisson all around. Without it, life is lackluster. So why don't more people embrace the unexpected? They run from it or try to subdue it when they should instead roll with it.

Why Laughter Is Contagious

By Rob Kendall on March 26, 2015 in Blamestorming
How does laughter work? Who laughs more when telling a joke - the speaker or the listener? Are there different types of laughter? And do we laugh randomly or not?

Recovering From Seasonal Shifts in Mood in Bipolar Disorder

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on March 26, 2015 in Take Control
For people who have bipolar disorder, seasonal changes in mood can disrupt your health and well being. You can learn to recognize and address these seasonal shifts before they cause harm. We examine the effects of these shifts on motivation, thinking and identity. Early recognition can help you gain better control of bipolar spectrum disorder.
Whatever Happened to Health?

Whatever Happened to Health?

What you don't count often counts most. If the numbers are good, how bad can things be?
Pretty bad.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

"Everyone is different." This is the fundamental tenant of Precision Medicine: to utilize this difference to improve outcome. Real life is more complicated, and there is a lot that is not yet worked out before this approach will yield benefits.

6 Ways to Improve Your Self-Discipline Today

Self-discipline isn't an innate characteristic, it's a learned skill. The good news is, we all have the ability to start improving our self-discipline today.

Anorexia and the Dangers of Blog Post Titles

By Emily T. Troscianko on March 26, 2015 in A Hunger Artist
Few topics induce stronger emotion than parenting and children’s illness, and where emotions are heightened miscommunication can easily occur. Here I try to clarify my mother’s original argument, respond to some readers’ comments which blur the crucial distinction between personal and scientific ‘findings’, and reflect on the role of choice in recovery from anorexia.

Anorexia Affects More Men Than Previously Thought

Anorexia and bulimia are traditionally seen as “female problems” but recent studies show that approximately one third of people with anorexia and about one half of those with bulimia are men.

A Contrarian Approach to Negotiation

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 26, 2015 in How To Do Life
A kinder, gentler, often wiser approach to negotiating your compensation.

The Germanwings Crash, and How We Can Think About It

As uncomfortable as it is to accept, we now have to deal with the fact that a pilot locked his fellow pilot out of the cockpit and intentionally flew a plane filled with passengers into a mountainside.

What No One Tells You About Avoidant Men

A subgroup of men with an avoidant attachment style suffer from a condition known as the Madonna-whore complex. Men with this complex assign Madonna status to some women and whore status to others.

Workplace Bullying: A Real Issue, A Real Solution

By Shimi Kang M.D. on March 25, 2015 in The Dolphin Way
Tigertown is a pushing, demanding, and stifling workplace. The hours are long, and the management is predatory, the employees are solitary, there is little community – definitely no mentors, and no time for fun or collegial bonding. Tigertown is an incubator for an insidiously growing problem - workplace bullying.

Brian Williams, Journalism, and Celebrity Culture

When journalists start living in a celebrity bubble, bad things can happen. Just ask Brian Williams. His downfall reminds us of the malleability of memory, and it also poses a cautionary tale to all journalists, particularly to the trend in journalism education to promote "entrepreneurial" journalism -- teaching aspiring journalists to cultivate their own "brand".

Is the Wedding Still On?

There's more to deciding how to treat acne than counting the pimples.

Awkward! 10 Ways Social Life Gets Really Uncomfortable

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on March 25, 2015 in Living Single
We all have socially awkward experiences, but what makes a social interaction so uncomfortable? Research has pointed to 10 kinds of experiences that are especially likely to make people feel awkward, and 6 things people can do to escape from the awkwardness (without just walking away) and feel comfortable again.

10 Reasons You Should Go to Sleep Right Now

On the myriad benefits of sleep, glorious sleep.

'Misremembering' Is All Too Human and All Too Common

When do you cross the line between forgetting and lying?

How to Regain Control of Your Relationship in 10 Easy Steps

Do you feel the power has been shifting in your relationship? Did you suddenly find yourself adjusting your calendar according to your partner’s schedule, canceling appointments to have lunch with her (or him), waiting for her to call or write, following her around like a little puppy dog? Here are 10 ways to change things around.

The 5 Weirdest Psychology Experiments

Over the years, psychologists have come up with some ingenious experiments in an effort to study human behavior. Here are some of the oddest psychological studies ever conducted.

Delirious Mania?

On March 9, on a Monday afternoon in DeKalb County, Georgia, Anthony Hill, a black Air Force veteran in postdeployment from Afghanistan, removed all his clothes, slid down from the balcony of his second-floor apartment, and began walking.
Addiction or Dependency?  Does it Matter?

Addiction or Dependency? Does it Matter?

Many of my patients often ask me, “What’s the difference between being addicted to prescription pain medications versus being dependent?” To help shed light on this important topic, I’d like to examine each classification.