Karen Spangenberg Postal, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Dr. Karen Spangenberg Postal, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.-C.N.

Karen Spangenberg Postal, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.-C.N., is the immediate past president of the Massachusetts Psychological Association, an incoming president of the Massachusetts Neuropsychological Society, and a member of the Board of Directors of American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology. She is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and the Wright Institute with a post doctoral fellowship in neuropsychology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. She has conducted research in Alzheimer's disease and atypical dementia syndromes, memory disorders, and super-selective WADA procedures. She is board certified in neuropsychology by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and is on the faculty of Harvard Medical School where she teaches postdoctoral fellows in neuropsychology.

Dr. Postal is the author of several peer reviewed journal articles and a book chapter in the area of memory and cognitive neuroscience. She has a book in press with the Oxford University Press on best practices to help patients and families understand and utilize feedback effectively in neuropsychological assessment.

As part of the larger mission of her clinical practice, Dr. Postal lectures widely to parents, teachers, and special education staff, translating the latest neuroscience research into accessible, practical, user friendly learning techniques.

 

 

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Think Better

Here is a fresh guide to helping children succeed academically by applying neuroscience to the classroom. The blog is geared to parents and teachers of elementary through college students who want their children to earn better grades, or to make sure their children continue to earn "As" even as academic demands increase.