Jeanne Murray Walker, Ph. D.

Jeanne Murray Walker, Ph.D.

Jeanne Murray Walker, award winning author of the memoir, The Geography of Memory:  A Pilgrimage Through Alzheimer's, is a Professor of English at The University of Delaware.  She has written hundreds of essays, poems, and short stories which have appeared in numerous journals and papers, including The Nation, The American Poetry Review, The Georgia Review, Image, Best American Poetry, and The Atlantic Monthly.  Her scripts have been performed in theatres across the United States and London.  She has appeared on television and is frequently interviewed on the radio.  She lectures, teaches, and gives readings extensively in places ranging from The Library of Congress and Oxford University, to Whidbey Island and Texas canyon country.    An Atlantic Monthly Fellow at Bread Loaf School of English, Jeanne has been honored with a Pew Fellowship in the Arts and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.   She serves on the Editorial Board of Image and Shenandoah magazines.   Her memoir, The Geography of Memory:  A Pilgrimage through Alzheimers, ponders the nature of memory and tells a fast-paced story about her decade of taking care of her mother.  (Photo Credit: Kathy F. Atkinson)

 

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Author of

The Geography of Memory

These posts will take a hard look at what occurred in one family when its matriarch veered into Alzheimer’s--including the humor and the surprises.  If you are worried about Alzheimer’s, this blog offers information and suggestions.  If you care for someone with senior dementia, it will suggest a way to read the garbled messages.  If you’re looking for a true, fierce and loving family story, tune in.  News on the street about Alzheimer’s is distorted and terrifying right now.  Putting the disease in context can calm some of our terror.