David Rettew, M.D.

David Rettew, M.D.

David Rettew, M.D., is a child psychiatrist and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. He is the author of Child Temperament: New Thinking about the Boundary between Traits and Illness, published by W. W. Norton in 2013. Dr. Rettew is the Training Director of the UVM Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship and the Director of the Pediatric Psychiatry Clinic at Fletcher Allen Health Care. He received his undergraduate degree in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania before working at the National Institute of Mental Health. He received his medical degree at the University of Vermont and then did both his adult and child psychiatry training at Harvard Medical School within the Massachusetts General and McLean Hospital program. He joined the UVM faculty in 2002 where he divides his time between clinical, teaching and research activities. His main research interest is the role of temperament and personality factors in childhood psychiatric disorders. Dr. Rettew has over 100 published journal articles, chapters, and scientific abstracts on a variety of child mental health topics. He delivers a regular television feature for WCAX in Burlington, Vermont about parenting and technology. He is married and the father of three boys.

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ABCs of Child Psychiatry

This blog is devoted to bringing new, accurate, and readable information about child mental health issues.  While many posts will be related to my book Child Temperament:  New Thinking About the Boundary Between Traits and Illness, a variety of other topics will be explored including new research findings, public policy issues and practical clinical recommendations.  I consider myself to be an extreme moderate on most issues and try to avoid the flashy but usually false allure of more polarized viewpoints.  The human brain, after all, is pretty complicated.