Working with B*tches

Career counseling for the disappointed

'Working With Bitches' Includes the Screamer Type

Shouting angrily, accusing, ranting, and throwing tantrums in the office

Continuing on: Describing the behavioural types in 'Working with Bitches'  you may come across

(after each type has been described, I will then look at what can be done to protect yourself)

The Screamer

  • complains, yells, dresses down staff
  • expects everyone to drop everything and do what she demands
  • in a perpetual bad, grumpy mood
  • she may be disorganised, loses things, can't locate things on her desk but accuses others of stealing them
  • wages a battle of wills over the slightest thing
  • she may stamp her feet, bang the table, throw things
  • calls staff derogatory names
  • like a volcano about to erupt, she taps the desk to signal her boredom while you try to explain things

Screamer strides out, poking the report in her hand.

“What’s this mess? I don’t want it done like that! HOW many times do I have to tell you!”

Tightly wound, red faced in her rage, she barks instructions to the' spineless' staff who cringe.  Volatile, demanding, and vicious, she seems about to erupt at any moment. She never relaxes, but is poised to find fault. She is a tiger and sees the staff as chickens.

Find a Therapist

Search for a mental health professional near you.

She shoulders responsibility for the entire organisation, and considers that no one else is competent. She 'has to' do it or fix it because everyone else can't - if she doesn't stay on top of people they would 'slack off'

 

 

TIP COMMENTS

I scream my displeasure at having to work with you
I'm the important one who makes things happen around here
meredith fuller
: Seeking out a good manager.

Jenny Stephens, a general manager and mentor to many, has a commitment to providing excellent communication and getting the best from staff.

“Leaders must be visible and staff need a connection to them.  Know what people need in times of change in order to help them flourish, not sink.

I am a feminist – many women have rejected the male paradigms of how things work; the boys club culture can be destructive to individual integrity. While their decisions may be for the corporate good, they are more likely to take the easy path to elevation, not the patient path to lead people.

I always seek out a group of women for friendship, support, and allegiance.  Always ask, “How can we work best together and complement each other?” She sorts out emergent problems. “I am feeling X at the moment.  Is there a way we could work together? What do we need?”

It is a waste of time to have women caught up in bitching. She wonders why organisations would allow this behaviour.

“If people are unhappy they don’t work their best, and this erodes organisational success. I have a sense of self, so I won’t stay if a workplace is vile and cannot be changed – don’t suffer if you have the capacity to make a choice!”

“If we are talking about underperformance, I see that as my job as manager to fix. I ask, Why are you here? How can you get more out of your job? Let’s do it!”

She stresses that it is all about managing performance, and yes, it is time consuming.

“You need to act immediately and sort things, otherwise the perception of your leadership suffers.  I enable people to have the best shot at doing the best they can. I know they will be happier. I have zero tolerance for chinese whispers – if I find out that a direct report is doing it, I raise it immediately. I call it. You do not complain and undermine from within – it affects everyone.”

Great leaders have a paradoxical blend of personal humility and professional will.  Their ambition is for the organisation – the people – not for themselves.

Meredith Fuller is the author of Working with Bitches and a vocational psychologist and career change and development specialist.

more...

Subscribe to Working with B*tches

Current Issue

Just Say It

When and how should we open up to loved ones?