Turning Straw Into Gold

Life through a Buddhist lens

Winter Lovers, Humbuggers, and Poets: 21 Quotes on Winter

Keep warm as you enjoy these winter quotations with paintings by Andrew Wyeth.

All of the paintings that accompany the quotations are by Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009). He painted with watercolor, drybrush watercolor, or egg tempera —the latter being a Renaissance technique in which egg yolk instead of oil is used as the medium. Egg tempura dries fast and must be applied thinly in transparent or semi-opaque layers. Wyeth said that using egg tempura slowed down his painting process and this allowed him to concentrate on textural effects and detail.

First Snow
Winter Lovers

“I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape—the loneliness of it, the dead feeling of winter. Something waits beneath it; the whole story doesn’t show.” —Andrew Wyeth

“You can’t get too much winter in the winter.” —Robert Frost

“Nature looks dead in winter because her life is gathered into her heart. She withers the plant down to the root that she may grow it up again fairer and stronger. She calls her family together within her inmost home to prepare them for being scattered abroad upon the face of the earth.” —Hugh Macmillan, The Ministry of Nature, 1871

Master Bedroom
“Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.”
—Edith Sitwell

“In seed time learn, in harvest teach, in winter enjoy.” —William Blake

“I like these cold, gray winter days. Days like these let you savor a bad mood.” —Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin & Hobbes

“I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says ‘Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.’” ―Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Winter Humbuggers

“A lot of people like snow. I find it to be an unnecessary freezing of water.” —Carl Reiner

“Winter is the season in which people try to keep the house as warm as it was in the summer, when they complained about the heat.” —Author unknown

Ring Road
“Every mile is two in winter.” —George Herbert

“Winter is not a season, it's an occupation.” —Sinclair Lewis

“You can only look forward to a South Dakota winter if, as with childbirth, remodeling a house, or writing a novel, you're able to forget how bad it was the last time.” —Dan O’Brien

“To shorten winter, borrow some money due in spring.” —W.J. Vogel

“There are two seasons in Scotland: June and Winter.” —Billy Connolly

Winter Poets

Winter
“Blow, blow, thou winter wind, thou art not so unkind as man's ingratitude.” —William Shakespeare

 

 

 

“The days are short,

The sun a spark

Hung thin between

The dark and dark.”

John Updike, “January”

Ice Pool
“December's wintery breath is already clouding the pond, frosting the pane, obscuring summer's memory.” —John Geddes

“Snow flurries began to fall and they swirled around people's legs like house cats. It was magical, this snow globe world.” —Sarah Addison Allen, The Sugar Queen

“Are ye the ghosts of fallen leaves,

O flakes of snow,

For which, through naked trees, the winds

A-mourning go?”

John Banister Tabb

Birches
“Of winter's lifeless world each tree


Now seems a perfect part;


Yet each one holds summer's secret


Deep down within its heart.”


Charles G. Stater

 

Giving the last quotation to someone special…

“Our favorite amusement during that winter was tobogganing. In places the shore of the lake rises abruptly from the water's edge. Down these steep slopes we used to coast. We would get on our toboggan, a boy would give us a shove, and off we went! Plunging through drifts, leaping hollows, swooping down upon the lake, we would shoot across its gleaming surface to the opposite bank. What joy! What exhilarating madness! For one wild, glad moment we snapped the chain that binds us to earth, and joining hands with the winds we felt ourselves divine!” —Helen Keller, The Story of My Life

© 2013 Toni Bernhard www.tonibernhard.com

Thank you for reading my work. My most recent book is titled How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow.

I'm also the author of the award-winning How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and their Caregivers

Using the envelope icon, you can email this piece to others. To receive an email the next time I post, click here. I'm active on FacebookPinterest, and (to a lesser extent) Twitter.

Toni Bernhard, J.D., is a former law professor at University of California at Davis. She wrote the award-winning How to Be Sick and, recently, How to Wake Up.

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