Thinking Thin

Training your brain to think like a thin person, and other psychological techniques for healthy weight loss.

When Did Special Treats become the Everyday Norm?

When Did Special Treats become the Everyday Norm?

When did it happen? When did we Americans go from an occasional piece of pizza to having multiple slices throughout the week? When did we go from the occasional soda to drinking sugary soft drinks throughout the day? When did we go from a weekly overindulgence, such as a big dinner on Saturday night, to excess food every evening?

Now, I'm not against special treats. In fact, I advise people to have a moderate portion of a favorite food every day. But not more than ONE. And they have to make sure the rest of their food intake is healthy and moderate, too.

I asked Marc, a dieter who consulted with me, what a typical day of eating was like for him. Here's what he described: He would have some kind of sweet pastry for breakfast; packaged cheese crackers and/or chips for a mid-morning snack; a large hamburger, fries, coleslaw and soda for lunch; cookies and/or a doughnut with another soda for a mid-afternoon snack; a large entree such as lasagna, bread, salad and two beers for dinner; and candy and ice cream for a snack. He knew that he was eating too much unhealthy food. But at some level, it felt "right" to him, even though he was borderline obese and suffering from health problems. He felt entitled to eat that way. After all, it wasn't very different from how his brother and best friend ate-though he saw that they had gained a significant amount of weight in the previous five years, too.

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Over time, I helped Marc change his attitude toward food. He began to see that his way of eating was "right" if he wanted the negative health consequences of carrying around excess weight to continue-and to likely grow worse. He began to see that his way of eating was "wrong" if he wanted to be fitter and healthier. Even as he was losing a significant amount of weight, Marc still occasionally mourned not being able to eat as he had in the past. At these times, he needed to review his list of all the reasons it was worth it to stick to a healthier way of eating. And he needed to read a response card that reminded him that the excess and unhealthy food he had been accustomed to consuming was "right", only if he wanted to be obese. The concept of "only one favorite food a day" eventually became Marc's new norm; he stopped grieving and was able to fully celebrate how much better he felt.

Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., is President of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy and author of The Beck Diet Solution (Oxmoor House).

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