Thinking Global Change

Shaping tomorrow today

Thinking, Memory, and Blog Comments

Online blog comments don't seem like a big deal. But in fact, they may be a globally-relevant concern: They affect how you think and how your feel about controversial issues. We are only just beginning to understand their role. Read More

Commenting

Well, the article on commenting is definatly worth commenting:)
Seriously, the article is awesome. Commenting is the thing we do everyday on internet. It is an inseparatable part of our online presence, yet very few researches have been conducted in this field. Analysing Comments can be as helpful as reading body language helps us to understand a person's behavior in the real world, and you are doing an amzing job to elaborate this topic for us. Thanks and keep up the good work.

Commenting

Well, the article on commenting is definatly worth commenting:)
Seriously, the article is awesome. Commenting is the thing we do everyday on internet. It is an inseparatable part of our online presence, yet very few researches have been conducted in this field. Analysing Comments can be as helpful as reading body language helps us to understand a person's behavior in the real world, and you are doing an amzing job to elaborate this topic for us. Thanks and keep up the good work.

Internet Pathologies

We are only beginning to understand the implications of our online personas (like the gap between our everyday reality and our glossy instagram facebook profiles. Everyone looks like they live in a Sunny D commercial :)
I have found that reading the comments for an article or product will certainly impact my opinion or experience with that article or product, but only so far as I find my own preconcieved notions supported or negated. I do, however, want someone to make me think. I would love to have my ideas challenged and my preconceptions knocked down.
I suppose when I read through a list of comments I'm also picking up on pathologies...which I think makes it even easier to retain my own (maybe safe?) impressions. Sometimes it feels isolating (do all therapists feel that way?) That is not dissimilar from how I communicate in person.
That being said, I personally have a love/hate relationship with comment sections. I'm an introvert who craves connection. I leave comments in places that matter to me but some desire for self-preservation will often suggest that I not bother.
You are the commentator and we are just the little chatter under you...like the man with the microphone and the angry mob...how much does subtext matter?

hmmm

I sound like a defeated, kicked puppy. Christopher Lasche would have a field day ..hahaha

Blog comments

My father's idea of one of the lowest forms of human life was someone who would actually write an anonymous letter. Now we are all expected to read and write anonymous "letters." I don't feel comfortable using my own name to communicate with no one in particular, but would be willing to do so if the comments were instead directed to the author, and then perhaps summarized for the reader.

Similarly, it seems that people surveyed who enjoy NPR say that they do not like the man-in-the-street comments that it also broadcasts because these are seldom useful or interesting. With the exception of readers of the "Guardian," whose responses are sometimes funny, comments on the web usually seem to just run the gamut from boring to malevolent.

However, comments fill space without cost to the medium or website and contribute---like childrens' stories printed with [your child's name here] as the hero/heroine---to the pervasive idea that everything is about YOU.

Yours Truly,

Anonymous

You're just making that up!

What a bunch of stupid ridiculous crap! My angry comments are completely ineffectual and no one will even notice them or remember them!

Heh heh ...

When I read a news article or

When I read a news article or informational piece, I also review the blog comments. Unlike mainstream media, it gives people an opportunity to find out what others are thinking about a certain subject. Blog comments can also add to a story and offer additional resources about the issue. I am sure they make a major impact on how people think and react.

Here we see the idiot who

Here we see the idiot who cited a lead IPCC author (Richard Betts) an example of "conspiracy" ideation among "climate deniers".

What a complete pillock.

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Stephan Lewandowsky, Ph.D., is a Winthrop Professor, School of Psychology, at the University of Western Australia. more...

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