The Superhuman Mind

Cases of extraordinary mental ability

See How They Fly Like Lucy In the Sky

People pick them, not to spice up their Chicken Tikka Masala, but to enter an altered state of consciousness, where music is colored, people have auras, and the room warps and morphs. Perhaps a bit like going on a ride with Mrs. Kwan through Sally and Conrad’s house in the 2003 movie-version of Dr.Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat. Read More

Psilocybin if four D.M.T's bonded

My understanding of psilocybin is that it's four D.M.T. molecules bonded together. D.M.T. is nicknamed the spirit molecule for the above listed effects. There is great documentary called the D.M.T the Spirit Molecule that talks about how psilocybin breaks down slowly into D.M.T.

Psilocybin is four D.M.T's bonded

My understanding of psilocybin is that it's four D.M.T. molecules bonded together. D.M.T. is nicknamed the spirit molecule for the above listed effects. There is great documentary called the D.M.T the Spirit Molecule that talks about how psilocybin breaks down slowly into D.M.T.

Francis Crick and LSD

Great article, but the notion that Crick was using LSD during the time he was discivering DNA is an urban myth which sprung from a Daily Mail interview with someone who just made this story up and since then its appeared hundreds of times on the web, in books and magazines. LSD had barely arrived in Britain (1952) and was only in the possession of a few doctors. Crick's biographer found no truth in the story and Crick's wife thought it nonsense. He *did* use LSD a few times but not until the late 60s. The full story if anyone wants to delve deeper is in my social history of LSD in Britain, Albion Dreaming.
Thanks
Andy

Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25

Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958)[1] was a British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite.[2] The DNA work achieved the most fame because DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) plays essential roles in cell metabolism and genetics, and the discovery of its structure helped scientists understand how genetic information is passed from parents to children.
Franklin is best known for her work on the X-ray diffraction images of DNA which led to discovery of DNA double helix. Her data, according to Francis Crick, was "the data we actually used"[3] to formulate Crick and Watson's 1953 hypothesis regarding the structure of DNA.[4] Franklin's images of X-ray diffraction confirming the helical structure of DNA were shown to Watson without her approval or knowledge. Though this image and her accurate interpretation of the data provided valuable insight into the DNA structure, Franklin's scientific contributions to the discovery of the double helix are often overlooked. Unpublished drafts of her papers (written just as she was arranging to leave King's College London) show that she had independently determined the overall B-form of the DNA helix and the location of the phosphate groups on the outside of the structure. Moreover, Franklin personally told Crick and Watson that the backbones had to be on the outside, which was crucial since before this both they and Linus Pauling had independently generated non-illuminating models with the chains inside and the bases pointing outwards.[5] However, her work was published third, in the series of three DNA Nature articles, led by the paper of Watson and Crick which only hinted at her contribution to their hypothesis.

You've literally spammed

You've literally spammed every article on the internet with this quote taken out of context, which I can't find the original for. It is anyway unclear how much they used the data.

Anyone can check just how many times you've done this by Googling the following search:

Crick "data we actually used"

..and seeing just how many times this tendentious comment has been posted (hundreds, possibly thousands)

Some serious work has gone into rewriting history according to a narrow agenda here. Lie a certain group that is going through wikipedia changing as many pages as possible with the same agenda...

Interesting. I was surprised

Interesting. I was surprised too, when I read an article (in a biology course) that explained Rosalind Franklin's contributions to the discovery, because I had believed for years it was something that came to Crick from an LSD trip. If I remember correctly, I think I took this quote from Wikipedia and it reflects and reads much like the paper I read in school.

Crick and LSD

Thanks for this reference, Andy! We will definitely have a look.

Even though the Crick part of

Even though the Crick part of the article might not be true I think the article was still very informative on psilocybin and LCD.

LSD

sorry LSD not LCD...

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Berit Brogaard is a Professor of Philosophy with joint appointments in Philosophy, Psychology and the Center for Neurodynamics at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. She directs the St. Louis Synesthesia Lab. more...

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