The Athlete's Way

Sweat and the biology of bliss

Scientists Discover an Elixir for Stress Called Nociceptin

Scientists have identified a system in the brain that naturally moderates the effects of stress. Read More

I have experienced stress

I have experienced stress over more than 30 years caused by inappropriate behaviour in my family circle between close family members. Most likely, nobody outside of the family knows what has gone on. In recent years I have found that if I analyse my recuring dreams of real events that I was powerless to do anything about and consider specific acts by the other members caught up in the events, I do feel sorry for them. These reflective thoughts of compassion cause me to remember similar events and so I can build a bigger picture of the 'whys and wherefores'. This is what this article calls 'deconstructing the elements of what causes you stress - you can break the cycle of stress both psychologically and at a neural level'. My wife now understands that if I can talk about what I have dreamt and describe my process of analysis, while it is hurtful for her to consider what was done [mainly to her Mother by my brother]it relieves my stress. The evidence of this is that I do not dream about the things that I have discussed. However, like unpeeling an onion, I am recalling other events that I had witnessed but were more deeply buried and masked by the recurring dreams.
As this article suggests 'healthy, loving social connection ... and close-knit intimate bonds will always be ... the most effective way to combat depression and anxiety.'
Science, common sense and reality all come together on this one, Well Done and thanks for sharing the research.

Thank you jigsaw builder.

Thank you jigsaw builder.

Meditation and stress

Christopher so excited to chat with you at length at some point in time. I have just really started meditating, and have fallen in love with it. I have been doing a lot of investigation on it because I have always been under the impression I am to do something close to how Monks meditate. I have discovered that it is just something as simple as sitting quietly for as little as three minutes to just shut my brain down for a couple mins. I will just breathe deep through my nose and out my mouth. If I can not clear my mind I just count 4 seconds in and 4 seconds out each breath, and concentrate on just the counting. I have started going down to the beach and meditating in the morning to get my day started. I pull up and park my van staring at the ocean. I have an Enigma CD I put on, and I just sit and breath in through my nose and out through my mouth. I just count the waves, clouds, and birds. I will just watch the birds floating through the air in the wind. Anytime I start to feel my mind wonder I gently bring it back to just watching nature. I do this for about 15mins. and when I finish my day can commence. I feel at peace and this is how I prefer to start my day these days. I will stop from time to time throughout my day too if need be to just sit back take a couple deep breaths and repeat to myself over and over again that I can not change people, places, or things. However these are just additional meditations I do on a daily bases. As we both know though my daily routine is based largely on my passion which also happens to be another way to meditate for me. I either go for 3 mile run or to a CrossFit workout everyday. Running and CrossFit are my passions. So I totally know where you are coming from.

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Christopher Bergland is a world-class endurance athlete, coach, author, and political activist.

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