Nurturing Resilience

Raising children to be competent and caring.

Prevent Child Obesity: Simple, Surprising Research

Preventing disordered eating among our children can’t be done just at school. The best strategies are the simplest, but need schools and parents to both do their part. Read More

real food

I'm the mother of three skinny boys. They eat. A lot. They all pack lunches because there's no way school lunch would be enough food for them. I SO WISH I had the option of hot lunch!! No snacks are allowed at school.

So...they come home starving and eat the house down.

We sit down for dinner together every night. They walk both ways to school, and play outside after school. They all play sports.

And they're all in "slim" jeans that I have to modify to keep on.

They ped. says they're healthy and growing and just feed them. So I do. Real food...no processed junk.

It's hard having skinny, fast-metabolism boys in a world that is on a diet.

Two kids, two different problems.

My 9 year old daughter is obese - 4'4, 130 pounds, and my 16 year old son is too skinny - 5'10, 125. My daughter doesn't overeat, but she packs on the pounds anyway. She is moderately active. My son eats a lot, metabolism through the roof. He is also a runner. Same parents, same house, go figure.

Very informative!

Thank you for sharing this very informative post. I agree that we should be the model for our kids in terms of health. We should show and teach them about how to have a healthy lifestyle and we also need to make sure that we are doing it for them to see. Educating them about "empty" and "healthy" food will definitely help.

I would like to recommend the

I would like to recommend the free NAAFA Child Advocacy ToolkitSM (CATK).

The NAAFA Child Advocacy Toolkit shows how Health At Every Size® takes the focus off weight and directs it to healthful eating and enjoyable movement. It addresses bullying, building positive self-image and eliminating stigmatization of large children. Additionally, the CATK lists resources available to parents and educators or caregivers for educational materials, curriculum and programming that is beneficial for all children. It can be found at:
http://issuu.com/naafa/docs/naafa_childadvocacy2011combined_v04?viewMode...

I would like to recommend the

I would like to recommend the free NAAFA Child Advocacy ToolkitSM (CATK).

The NAAFA Child Advocacy Toolkit shows how Health At Every Size® takes the focus off weight and directs it to healthful eating and enjoyable movement. It addresses bullying, building positive self-image and eliminating stigmatization of large children. Additionally, the CATK lists resources available to parents and educators or caregivers for educational materials, curriculum and programming that is beneficial for all children. It can be found at:
http://issuu.com/naafa/docs/naafa_childadvocacy2011combined_v04?viewMode...

I would like to recommend the

I would like to recommend the free NAAFA Child Advocacy ToolkitSM (CATK).

The NAAFA Child Advocacy Toolkit shows how Health At Every Size® takes the focus off weight and directs it to healthful eating and enjoyable movement. It addresses bullying, building positive self-image and eliminating stigmatization of large children. Additionally, the CATK lists resources available to parents and educators or caregivers for educational materials, curriculum and programming that is beneficial for all children. It can be found at:
http://issuu.com/naafa/docs/naafa_childadvocacy2011combined_v04?viewMode...

Everyone has to get involved

Great information. There is no one solution for obese children. It will take parents, schools, governments, etc. to combat the childhood epidemic. But it starts at home. Be a good role model for your kids by eating healthy and exercising. They will want to do it too. Schools are starting to serve better food, but they have a long way to go. Limit the time in front of the TV because all the junk food ads aimed directly at children are not helping.

Some good news is that some cities are reporting a decline in childhood obesity. The more people that get actively involved in our children's health the better we all will be.

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Michael Ungar, Ph.D., is a family therapist, a researcher at Dalhousie University, and the author of The We Generation: Raising Socially Responsible Kids.

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