You're a Vegetarian. Have You Lost Your Mind?

Entirely vegan diets are unknown among traditional human cultures. Back in the early part of the 19th century, dentist Weston Price went looking for vegans, but found only cannibals. Since vegan diets in nature provide no vitamin B12 and very little in the way of usable long chain omega3 fatty acids, it is not surprising that humans have continued to eat animal products. Read More

Really.....

I started writing a long comment but then I stopped. Just travel around the world and see how many cultures, religions are generations of vegetarians and see their mental state.

There are actually very few

There are actually very few cultures and religions that are vegetarian, and other than certain Hindu groups all of them are fairly modern, see also the work of Weston Price. There are no traditional cultures that are vegan. Some small groups approach that, such as some Buddhist monks, but even then, they generally eat fish, and it is rarely a lifelong practice. Where there are traditional vegetarian groups they have very specific and complex dietary rules, and incorporate either fish, insects, or dairy, and generally have complex medical traditions using many herbs to combat inflammation. I say this as someone who was a vegetarian for 30 years, and raised three vegetarian children. I suffered from mental health issues, which were completely resolved by first an incredibly complex regimen of supplements, and finally by eating meat. All three of my children have horrible tooth enamel, are of much shorter stature than either my husband or myself, and have other health problems. (So far two have decided to remain vegetarian, and I have respected that choice, though I now encourage them to take a range of supplements. One has started to eat meat and has recovered from several of his lifelong health issues.) I respect totally anyone who can maintain good health as a vegetarian, but I would encourage you to keep an open mind to the reality that other people have suffered horribly from their choice to follow a vegetarian diet.

There are actually very few

There are actually very few cultures and religions that are vegetarian, and other than certain Hindu groups all of them are fairly modern, see also the work of Weston Price. There are no traditional cultures that are vegan. Some small groups approach that, such as some Buddhist monks, but even then, they generally eat fish, and it is rarely a lifelong practice. Where there are traditional vegetarian groups they have very specific and complex dietary rules, and incorporate either fish, insects, or dairy, and generally have complex medical traditions using many herbs to combat inflammation. I say this as someone who was a vegetarian for 30 years, and raised three vegetarian children. I suffered from mental health issues, which were completely resolved by first an incredibly complex regimen of supplements, and finally by eating meat. All three of my children have horrible tooth enamel, are of much shorter stature than either my husband or myself, and have other health problems. (So far two have decided to remain vegetarian, and I have respected that choice, though I now encourage them to take a range of supplements. One has started to eat meat and has recovered from several of his lifelong health issues.) I respect totally anyone who can maintain good health as a vegetarian, but I would encourage you to keep an open mind to the reality that other people have suffered horribly from their choice to follow a vegetarian diet.

Thank you...

Thanks for taking the time and commenting on this.

I belong to one of these cultures and religions that are generations of vegetarians. I agree with few of your points. Also, it depends on if you are a 1st generation vegetarian or it's a generational diet.

I'm having a hard time with this article because from how I'm reading it, it says that vegetarian diet has a causation relationship to mental health whereas there are other variables that play a role in a person's mental state not just diet (be it vegetarian or non vegetarians).

In my opinion this article is poorly written. I don't know how much research writing experience this authors has.

Wow, you didn't read the

Wow, you didn't read the article very closely. Only at the very end did she even speculate (and was quite clear that it was speculation and not currently supported by the data) that the vegetarian diet could have a causal role in the worsening of already- present mental health disorders. Maybe you need to re- read the article?

Vegie vs Meat Eaters

Most of the time when i get into this kind of discussion on why people are vego's - most of my friends etc eat vego way because of animal cruelty.

they actually totally get the healthy nod towards meat eaters, but *choose* to not eat meat for the cruelty, mega farmed aspect insert another cruel term in here aspect.

for a paleoesque diet to "win" here - we will need to make grassfed, sustainably farmed meat more available to the greater population.

lucky for me i live in australia - where i can get access to this quite easily. however i feel sorry for my american couterparts where the quality of food is basically pretty bad and to obtain grassfed meat can be expensive.

Vegan is better

Clinical studies have found that casein, a protein in all dairy products, blocks the absorption of antioxidants and renders them useless to our body. Get healthier by going vegan! nutritionfacts.org/video/nutrient-blocking-effects-of-dairy/

Are These Diets Good or Bad??

I mean, I can remember in high school when this one kid in my class ended up getting really sick. He ended up being ill for quite a long time, and with being a vegetarian, he was missing some of the nutrients that could have helped him recover quicker. On the other hand though, a diet which many think is really healthy could actually be not that good for you. For instance, the paleo diet has become pretty popular nowadays, but did you know that many health and nutrition experts disagree over how healthy it really is? If you haven't read anything about this debate yet, you should check out this article at: http://www.availclinical.com/news/paleo-diet-really-healthy-or-really-cr...

You can't expect someone to

You can't expect someone to switch over from a lifetime of eating something easily can you? That defies any professional medical point of view. Adapting to a vegan/egetarian diet will take time and could initially be hard on the body. Some however will say this is not true and immediately felt better (like me. Some, of course, who may have a longer and more intense genetic history of eating animal obviously wont.

It makes a certain amount of

It makes a certain amount of sense to exclude people over age 65.

At that age you start to include people who were children during WWII. The effects of living in war time -- nutritional deficiencies, PTSD, etc. are confounding factors that need to be excluded.

Interesting study though.

Vegetarianism/Veganism

Vegetarianism/Veganism changes the way you think. This is true. However, who says we absolutely need b12/omega 3's? Bollocks. Made up by the people who need to think animal is the only way to live. Regardless I am a health person and I do supplement with these things, from plant sources. I mean hell you can get them from plant sources anyway you know (blue green algae, spirulina, flax seed, borage oil.) If they are so necassary. Not as a supplement which the author neglected to site, I see.

Yes, we vegan/egetarians think different. Yes, I believe this is a more spiritual mind. We're less attuned to common bol shit and more in tune with a higher point of view. Yes, something more spiritual/divine you might call it. THAT is how we think.