Don't Delay

Understanding procrastination and how to achieve our goals

Do You Worry Too Much?

Do you worry too much?

The Dutiful Worrier
Do you feel it's your duty to worry? If your answer to this question is "yes," you may be suffering from a type of compulsive behavior called dutiful worrying. A new book authored by another Psychology Today blogger explains why some of us become compulsive worriers and offers a four-step program to end this vicious circle.

The Dutiful Worrier is a new book written by Elliot Cohen. I have interviewed Elliot for my iProcrastinate Podcasts, as the topic of worry, ruminating about decisions and irrational thinking are important in understanding procrastination. You can hear Elliot discuss this worry and procrastination connection in this podcast.

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In The Dutiful Worrier, Dr. Cohen pinpoints why some of us become compulsive worriers and offers a four-step program to end this vicious circle. With this book, you'll:

  • Identify and change the thoughts that propel your worry
  • Learn to make decisions without ruminating about them
  • Overcome feelings of guilt when you don't worry
  • Let go and give up worrying once and for all

Complete with self-evaluations and exercises, this book offers guidance for keeping perspective and accepting that you are not responsible for preventing catastrophe.

Learn more about Dr. Cohen, read some excerpts from the book or order The Dutiful Worrier online.

 

Timothy A. Pychyl, Ph.D., is an associate professor of psychology at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, where he specializes in the study of procrastination.

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