Brain Sense

How your brain makes sense of your senses.

Put Your Cell Phone in Your Sock Drawer, Part III

Children get more radiation from cell phones than adults do.

Earlier this year, I wrote about new research on the dangers of radiation from cell phones and asserted that, in my opinion, cell phones belong in sock drawers. See Part I and Part II.

Now a new report adds further credence to my argument.

An article published online October 17 in the journal Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine reports that children absorb twice as much microwave radiation from cell phones as adults do.

The paper, titled "Exposure Limits: The Underestimation of Absorbed Cell Phone Radiation, Especially in Children," notes that the industry-designed process for evaluating microwave radiation from phones results in children absorbing twice the cellphone radiation to their heads, up to triple in their brain's hippocampus and hypothalamus, greater absorption in their eyes, and as much as 10 times more in their bone marrow when compared to adults.

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One of the study's authors is Devra Davis, who is also the author of the popular book Disconnect--The Truth about Cell Phone Radiation, What Industry Has Done to Hide It and How to Protect Your Family.

In this new paper, Davis and her colleagues argue that the procedure used the measure the radiation risk of cell phones greatly underestimates the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) for typical mobile phone users, especially children. The SAR for a 10-year old, the paper states, is up to 153% higher than the published SAR. "When electrical properties are considered, a child's head's absorption can be over two times greater, and absorption of the skull's bone marrow can be ten times greater than adults," say the researchers.

The paper calls for a new certification process that takes into account different modes of use, head sizes, and tissue properties. Davis and her colleagues suggest that anatomically based models should be used to revise standards, and that accountable, independent groups should monitor cell phone safety.

Sock drawers work too.

 

 

 

Faith Brynie, Ph.D, is a scientific and medical writer. She is the author of Brain Sense (Amacom, 2009).

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