All About Addiction

Helping addicts get their lives back

Top 10 Great Things About Being Addicted

Addiction isn't all bad...

Here at All About Addiction we keep talking about fixing addiction and treating addiction given the suffering that addicts go through. But there are certainly some positive things that go along with being addicted and we figured we should point those out. So here is the top 10 addiction list:

Top 10 great things about being addicted

1. You get to do whatever you want whenever you want to do it—For many addicts, schedules are not an issue and consistent commitments no longer exist. This means that any given day can feel like a vacation. It's a great thing, although much of it gets taken up by looking for drugs, preparing drugs, trying to get money for drugs, or recovering. Still—vacation time!

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2. Being comfortable sleeping on a floor—This is a bit dependent on the specific drug (or drugs) you're addicted to but it's pretty common for addicts to be seen sleeping in bizarre places, positions, and clothing. Passing out on the floor may not sound good to you if you're not actively using drugs, but it can't be that bad if so many people do it for hours at a time. Hey, I once passed out half on a couch and half on the floor while on the phone!

3. You don't have to bother yourself with family obligations—Not only has most of your family probably stopped inviting you to events because being seen with you embarrasses them, but when invited you rarely show up (see #1 above) so they stopped trying. Besides, not liking to be tied down to specific times, addicts would rather do other things (like drugs) then hanging out with family and having to listen to stories, eat food, or play with children.

4. People don't annoy you with conversation—Whether because addicts seem aloof or unhappy or because they can smell bad, people seem less likely to engage addicts in random conversations. Of course, this doesn't apply to other people you meet at your drug dealer's house or the late-night liqueur store, but those "friends" can often tell you where to get more drugs, so it's not really a bother (more on this later). Cops also don't apply to this category.

5. Not having a boss breathing down your neck—Having a boss who can tell you what to do and when to do it can suck. Most addicts can't hold a job for too long though, so they don't have to worry about it. Granted, not having a job can affect you finances (as in you won't have money), which puts a damper on #1. Still, since you can be comfortable sleeping anywhere (see #2) it doesn't really matter if you can't afford a place to live. Besides, if you owe your dealer money, he'll be breathing down your neck enough.

6. Pesky mortgage, rent, and car payments are rarely an issue—Money issues like rent, mortgage, and such are without a doubt one of the most troubling aspects of living in a capitalistic society. For addicts who have homes and cars, the competition between paying for those or paying for drugs can be fierce (worse if you're addicted to gambling). Often times, drugs win, which removes the need to worry about it. As listed in the above points, not worrying about these things leaves you free to be on permanent vacation, sleep on the floor, or enjoy not having a boss... or job.

7. You can be late to anything when you're an addict —Most people get yelled, or at least scoffed, at when late to events, but not addicts. As we pointed out above, addicts don't get invited to as many things and rarely make it at all when they do. Being late is actually a successful outcome for a drug addict. Drug dealers are often late themselves, and while they can be upset if you're late when picking up, they'll take your money and give you drugs, which is all that matters anyway.

8. Sleeping in becomes a way of life —We already mentioned that addicts seem to be able to sleep anywhere, but we didn't mention that they can also sleep in late, or even all day. Meth addicts can crash for days and others simply don't get out of bed or their room for days at a time. Of course, if you're a heroin addict or alcoholic and have been using for a while, you may have to wake up in the middle of the night to get a fix because withdrawal can start within a few hours. But then you get to stay there as long as you'd like. Neat!

9. Not worrying about hygiene, looking good or fit —Vanity is for the meek and worrying about things like health, skin, hair, and showers is beneath those who are concerned with more basic needs like feeling good and surviving. You might be thinking already that given some of the above points about lack of work, money, and a reliable living situation, vanity might also be difficult for many in active addiction. You'd be right. The choice between brushing your teeth, taking a shower, or working on your next hit is not one that requires much thinking. Hygiene can wait.

10. Getting a group of very close friends that relate—Like in recovery, addicts tend to associate almost exclusively with others who use their drug(s) of choice. This means that your friends know, and care, a lot about everything you care about. They can recommend good spots to shoot up, places to get rigs, smoke-shops that are open late, and other relevant information most people would be stumped about. Those friends are likely also experiencing the rest of this list, so they can relate! Unfortunately, some of these friends might steal from you, lie to you, or even beat you up because they want your drugs, money, or due to a psychotic break. Nothing is perfect though...

We could probably think of more, but I think that this top 10 list gets at some of the most basic things that active addiction is great at providing. As you've probably caught onto by now, the piece was written as a tongue-in-cheek sarcastic comment on the reality, but also stereotypes, of addicts. We've talked about the stigma of addiction before, and we are in no way trying to promote the notion that all addicts are homeless, bearded, unshowered men. We hope this piece can start a conversation that challenges that view. In the meanime, we'd love to hear more thoughts from people who are either still using or those of you who have quit. Family members' thoughts would also be welcome but annoyingly they usually notice the "bad" things about addiction more often and that's a bummer (another joke).

 

© 2012 Adi Jaffe, All Rights Reserved

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Adi Jaffe, Ph.D., is the executive director of Alternatives Behavioral Health and a lecturer at UCLA and California State University Long Beach.

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